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NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Since the beginning of the Atco United Methodist Church 10 decades ago, parishioners have dug a cellar, moved a parsonage, bought a young minister a much-needed suit and purchased a new set of false teeth for another. Today, members of the church, one of Atco's oldest, will gather to celebrate the church's centennial and reminisce with 12 of the congregation's former ministers. The church's history goes hand in hand with Atco's history, relates the Rev. Jere Hopkins-Doerr, pastor of the church since 1983.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1784, the Rev. Richard Allen, the country's first black Methodist pastor, walked to Radnor from Maryland to preach at the Radnor United Methodist Church, which is today the oldest Methodist church in Delaware County. With feet so sore he could not even come to the table for meals, he addressed "a large congregation of different persuasions," according to the history of the church. Mr. Allen, who went on to found the African Methodist Episcopal Bethel Church in Society Hill, is now a key figure of the Radnor church's history.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. William S. Barker 2d, academic dean and professor of religious history at Westminster Theological Seminary in Glenside, has been elected to head the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA). Mr. Barker, 59, was chosen moderator of the nation's second-largest Presbyterian denomination Monday by delegates at the PCA's 22d general assembly, which is meeting in Atlanta this week. As moderator, Mr. Barker will chair the general assembly and offer the keynote address at next year's conference.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dorothy Kille Thomas, 76, a longtime member of the Haddonfield United Methodist Church and author of the church's 150th-anniversary history, died Tuesday at her Haddonfield home. Born and raised in Pitman, she was a 1936 graduate of Pitman High School, where she was on the girls' field hockey team and the cheerleading squad. A Haddonfield resident since 1951, Mrs. Thomas was informally the church's historian, particularly after being asked to oversee the writing of the church history published in 1979.
NEWS
March 26, 2014
To the casual observer, it might look like just another sightseeing group taking selfies in Rome. But this entourage includes Gov. Corbett, Mayor Nutter, and Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput. The delegation will have an audience Wednesday with Pope Francis to see if he will attend the September 2015 World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia, which his predecessor, Benedict XVI, announced and was expected to attend. This eighth meeting will be very important for Pennsylvania, even if the pope decides he won't be able to participate.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Eileen Kenna, Special to The Inquirer
Effective tomorrow, Westminster Theological Seminary in Glenside will have a new president and academic dean. The Rev. Samuel T. Logan Jr. of Glenside, academic dean of the seminary since 1982, was elected president last month by the seminary's board of trustees, succeeding the Rev. George C. Fuller. Mr. Fuller, a tenured professor of practical theology, wished to return full time to teaching after nine years as president, said Laurence Sibley Jr., seminary director of public relations.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Jean Mather, 65, rector of Christ Church and St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Germantown, died Wednesday, June 13, of heart failure while attending a vestry meeting in the parish house. Dr. Mather had been rector since 1999 and also served on the board of Episcopal Community Services in Philadelphia. "Mother Jean, as she preferred to be called, was a great comfort to all she visited," said vestry member Muriel Rains. "Mother encouraged feeding the hungry, reaching out to the community, and caring for one another.
NEWS
September 7, 2006
RE THE OP-ED "In defense of the (inevitable) ordination of women": While female priests may or may not benefit the Roman Catholic Church in the United States, Canada and Europe, the idea is strongly opposed by most of the 1 billion Roman Catholics throughout the world. The Anglican Community, mentioned by Professor Endres in her support of female ordination, is being ripped apart by rich-world insistence on female ordination, among other things. This tendency of a rich and powerful minority pushing its views on a large, poor majority is neither attractive nor Christian.
NEWS
November 3, 2002 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Every Sunday morning, four generations of Jeanne Webb's family fill up the front pews of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Westville. The family's attendance at Sunday services is a tradition that dates to the church's beginnings in 1902, when Webb's grandparents, Wynfield and Miriam Firth, were among the founding families. Webb, now 72, was baptized, confirmed and married in the church. And it is where she has bid farewell to loved ones who have died. "I grew up in this church," Webb said.
NEWS
March 22, 2006 | By Jeff Price INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Its history was long, like its name - the Presbyterian Home for Aged Couples and Aged Persons. During the last month, most of its noble Victorian main edifice and outbuildings on City Avenue in the Wynnefield Heights section of Philadelphia have come down, to be replaced with up to seven acres of apartments. Only the original four-story structure, dedicated in 1894, remains. Gone are two massive wings, a large chapel, an infirmary, a 1958 residential addition and a power plant.
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NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the months before his death, the Rev. James A. Benson kept working on exhibits for his museum in Lawnside. "He was sick in the hospital, cutting things out of the newspaper and using the nurses' tape," Benson's widow, Ellen, recalls. "He was always asking, 'What's going on at the museum?' " A retired Lawnside postmaster, she's grateful that her husband - who was 81 when he died of leukemia Dec. 8 - doesn't have to hear the answer to his frequent question. The Benson History Museum he founded, owned, and operated (at no charge to visitors)
NEWS
March 26, 2014
To the casual observer, it might look like just another sightseeing group taking selfies in Rome. But this entourage includes Gov. Corbett, Mayor Nutter, and Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput. The delegation will have an audience Wednesday with Pope Francis to see if he will attend the September 2015 World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia, which his predecessor, Benedict XVI, announced and was expected to attend. This eighth meeting will be very important for Pennsylvania, even if the pope decides he won't be able to participate.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - In choosing a name no other pope had ever taken, Pope Francis could be heralding a time of change for the Catholic Church. The name recalls two of the church's most famous saints. One is Francis of Assisi, the man from the Umbrian hill town who renounced a wealthy, dissolute lifestyle to found the Franciscan order of friars in 1209, embracing a life of poverty and simplicity and going out in the countryside to preach a message of joy and peace. The other is Francis Xavier, a 16th-century globe-trotting Spaniard who became one of Christianity's greatest missionaries and was a founding figure of the Jesuit order, of which the new pope is a member.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
As construction was winding down at the new Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Church building in Limerick, Jack Schmidt sneaked in to get a glimpse of his past. The retired Peco worker had grown up in West Kensington as a member of St. Boniface Catholic Church, which closed in 2006 and which was demolished last year. But inside Blessed Teresa was a 37-foot-high reminder of the years Schmidt, 71, served as an altar boy, attended Boy Scout meetings, and went to school in the Philadelphia parish.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last decade has been a season of agony for the Catholic Church in the United States, a pilgrimage through purgatory made all the more painful by being self-inflicted. Thousands of children have accused Catholic priests, seminarians, nuns, and brothers of molesting them. Victims have told stories of suffering intensified by official church neglect. The church has paid out billions of dollars in settlements. Most controversial of all, Catholic bishops have been accused of trying to hush it all up, shuffling offenders from one unsuspecting parish to another.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Jean Mather, 65, rector of Christ Church and St. Michael's Episcopal Church in Germantown, died Wednesday, June 13, of heart failure while attending a vestry meeting in the parish house. Dr. Mather had been rector since 1999 and also served on the board of Episcopal Community Services in Philadelphia. "Mother Jean, as she preferred to be called, was a great comfort to all she visited," said vestry member Muriel Rains. "Mother encouraged feeding the hungry, reaching out to the community, and caring for one another.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert F. McGovern, 78, of Narberth, a professor emeritus at the University of the Arts whose wood carvings and sculptures adorn numerous churches, died of complications from leukemia, Wednesday, April 13, at Lankenau Hospital. In 2003, Villanova University featured a 50-year retrospective show of Mr. McGovern's paintings, prints, wood carvings, and sculptures. Inquirer art critic Victoria Donohoe wrote that the exhibit "offers a formidable presentation of work by a confident and mature artist who aims to show traditional religious subjects in a way that has meaning for today.
NEWS
July 18, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John H. Ahtes III, 48, of Wallingford, a history and theology professor and archaeological detective, died at home Sunday, July 11, of a heart attack. His family had a history of heart disease. Since 2002, Mr. Ahtes had taught at Immaculata University. For the last year he also had taught church history at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood. Before joining Immaculata, he taught at the University of Pennsylvania and La Salle and Drexel Universities. "John's classes were always full, and his world religion class was one of the most popular courses at Immaculata," said William E. Watson, chair of the history department and a longtime friend.
NEWS
September 30, 2007 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Young Catholics from throughout the region gathered yesterday afternoon to mark the 200th anniversary of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, enjoying games, food and music. The festival was held on the grounds of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood, where 3,000 to 4,000 people attended a Mass celebrated on the front lawn by Cardinal Justin Rigali and retired Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua. The aim of the event was to get youths to recognize the history and tradition of the church, said the Rev. Joseph McLoone, 44, pastor at St. Katharine Drexel in Chester and the festival's coordinator.
NEWS
May 23, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The names are brief, containing an ocean: John. Toby. They belonged to James Willard. Ben. Coffey. Bety (Girle). Cuggo. Cate. Bosso. Fillis. Cate (Girle). Jack. They belonged to Tobias Leech. Jacob. Elizabeth. The list continues. Henry. Mary. William. John. Jemineha. Slaves all, and all owned in the 18th century by the wealthy and influential founding families of Trinity Church Oxford, a 300-year-old Episcopal parish at what is now Oxford and Longshore Avenues in the Northeast.
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