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NEWS
February 2, 1987 | By Roy Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican mayoral candidate John J. Egan Jr., who fared poorly among black voters in the 1983 mayoral election, attended a service at a black church yesterday, saying he would not "concede any community to any candidate. " Invoking the spirit of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Egan told members of Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church in West Philadelphia that the slain civil rights leader would have had a smile on his face if he had been in the church yesterday. "He would be amazed that a white man would be standing in front of a black congregation and imploring you to judge me by the content of my character and not the color of my skin," Egan said.
NEWS
November 21, 1994 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
At a "Service of Sorrow and Healing" at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Glenside last night, there were words of comfort, sorrow and reconciliation in the aftermath of Eddie Polec's slaying. Teen-agers from Abington were among the worshipers as pastors and priests read Bible passages to acknowledge the anguish of those from Philadelphia's Fox Chase section, where 16-year-old Polec had lived. And the anguish of those from the Abington Township area, which has seen the arrest of some of its teens in connection with Polec's death.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Mark Fazlollah contributed to this article
Sunday services at a Philadelphia church turned violent yesterday as warring factions in an intense power struggle at the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith clashed inside the sanctuary. Police, some in riot gear, were called to break up the confrontation, which included a wrestling match near the altar. The clash came during a memorial service for Bishop S. McDowell Shelton, who led the church until his death last month. No arrests were made. Just after 1 p.m., police cars with lights flashing surrounded the church at 22d and Bainbridge Streets, and inside it seemed like anything but a church service.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Kevin Mills wept as he thanked his church congregation yesterday for its support, then surrendered to authorities for refusing to serve in the Persian Gulf war. The 19-year-old Army reservist told a packed Union Temple Baptist Church that his strong religious beliefs led him to seek conscientious-objector status in November and to refuse orders to the gulf in February. "For God I live, for God I die," he said to applause, tears and a chorus of "Amen. " Mills and Jean-Claude Rainey, 21, a Marine Corps reservist who also refused to go to the gulf, appeared at the southeast Washington church, one of the nation's most prominent black churches, before surrendering at the Anacostia Naval Station.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinary challenge to the American hierarchy, conservative Anglican archbishops disturbed by the Episcopal Church USA's liberal views on sexuality will conduct their own confirmation service here Sunday. Archbishop Maurice Sinclair of South America, along with several African and Australian archbishops or their delegates, plan to march into the chancel of Rosemont's Church of the Good Shepherd for a 6 p.m. evensong service, where they will confirm more than 70 youths and adults.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a year now since that Palm Sunday morning when The Tornado flattened the Goshen United Methodist Church. Of the 146 worshipers in the church where Kelly Clem is pastor, 20 were killed, 90 injured; nearly everyone in this East Alabama town of 6,000 lost someone. Such indiscriminate savagery of nature is not supposed to happen in towns like this one, at the edge of Talledega National Forest, a sort of notch on the Bible Belt held fast by Faith. People live their lives with trust in a God who will keep them safe.
NEWS
February 22, 1999 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Clarence Labor said his brother-in-law's house was burned down. Allieu Bangura said his 8- and 12-year-old nieces were missing. And Foday Mansaray said five of his family members had been killed since January. They and other relatives of victims of the violence in Sierra Leone prayed yesterday at Berry-Long Memorial United Methodist Church in West Philadelphia for an end to the violence. "The fighting is still going on. There are 40,000 people living in the National Soccer Stadium," said Mr. Labor, minister of Sellers Memorial and Stonehurst Hills United Methodist Churches in Upper Darby.
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The worshipers at the Collenbrook United Church can never be too sure which hymnal they will sing on any given Sunday. Some of the parishioners are members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and others belong to the United Church of Christ. "I literally put the service together each week and pick the songs that go with my service," said the Rev. Cynthia Eiler Bowman, who is an ordained Presbyterian minister. "Some weeks, we'll use hymns from the Presbyterian hymnal and sometimes from the United Church of Christ hymnal.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Staff writer Clea Benson contributed to this report
A prayer went up in Grays Ferry last night. It was a plea for peace and racial harmony to come to a Philadelphia neighborhood that has seen little of either for a long time. More than 800 people filled two churches to overflowing for an ecumenical prayer service organized by the newly formed Grays Ferry Interdenominational Clergy Council. The prayer service was called to help ease tension in the racially troubled neighborhood. They crammed into King of Peace Catholic Church at 26th and Wharton Streets, spilling onto the sidewalk and into 26th Street, for the first part of the service.
NEWS
August 23, 2004 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a divinely beautiful Sunday morning, and double-murder suspect Lyndell Swinson thought he'd go to church. Unfortunately for Swinson, he picked the Mount Airy Church of God in Christ, where one of the ministers is also a Philadelphia police lieutenant. After yesterday's 11 a.m. service, Swinson, 26, left his pew and walked out onto the church steps and into the arms of a waiting SWAT team. "Why he was in church, I have no idea," Philadelphia Police Capt. Richard Ross said at a news conference yesterday.
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NEWS
April 2, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ODELL REED was all about helping people, a passion that went in several directions in her long life. Working through her church, Tindley Temple United Methodist, she fed the homeless for 15 years as head of the soup kitchen. She made sure the needy people who came to the church were taken care of. Every Christmas, some 150 to 175 needy people each got a gift, as well as a hot meal. On Thanksgiving, there was roast turkey with all the trimmings. Throughout the year, the church fed hundreds of homeless and underprivileged people every week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
IT WAS the death of her mother's pet squirrel that sparked 11-year-old Mackenzie McCarty 's interest in taxidermy. The sixth-grader from the Philly 'burbs will get to showcase her talents today at 2 p.m. on NBC10's "Steve Harvey" show, where she will present him with a tiny surprise. McCarty, of Warminster, has a "no-kill" policy on taxidermy, wherein she retrieves her subjects from roadkill rather than purchasing them already dead. "My mom's squirrel died and she would take me to the taxidermist shop with her and I would love to see the animals," McCarty told me yesterday.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Not at my church. That's the attitude - described later as both "pretty stupid" and "incredibly heroic" - that two ushers displayed when an assailant pointed a gun at them and a 72-year-old friar, and snatched away a collection bag they were carrying. Without hesitating, the two younger men ran after the assailant and recovered the money. About 1:30 p.m. Sunday, after one of the busiest Masses of the year at St. Anthony of Padua in Camden - celebrating First Communion for dozens of children - ushers Francisco Torres and Jose Garcia brought the canvas bag holding the day's collection to Brother Karl Koenig in the sacristy.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
BUX-MONT'S landmark Bryn Athyn Cathedral looms large in its community - 180 feet large, measuring to the top of its tallest tower. Inside, the view from the pews is awe-inspiring. Artisans built the place just after the turn of the 20th century to resemble Europe's great medieval churches, down to blowing their own stained glass on site. Outside, the view overlooking the Pennypack Creek Valley from the vast, terraced grounds is breathtaking. But the church's congregation is as ordinary as they come: a button-downed collection of women in sensible, pretty dresses, men in jackets and slacks, and very well-scrubbed college students from Bryn Athyn College across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With its history of inhabiting and mixing song genres, Lyricfest eventually was bound to find its way to the spiritual and its offshoots, and did so Sunday with singers who packed the First Presbyterian Church: Denyce Graves, Lisa Daltirus, and Kevin Deas. Lyricfest has a penchant for spoken commentary, and this "Journey Toward Freedom" program had the Rev. Charles Rice sketching the Civil Rights movement's progress, interspersed with songs by Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, and more classically slanted pieces by Ricky Ian Gordon, a great champion of Langston Hughes.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police are investigating a reported incident of racist graffiti at the home of an African American family in Burlington County. Someone wrote "KKK" with chalk Wednesday night on the front brick wall of Eulith Rankines' house in Maple Shade, said Rankines, 41, a real estate agent. Rankines' family had left for a church service shortly before 7 p.m., and when his wife returned home, she discovered the graffiti in the area of the front porch, he said. The letters combined were about a foot square and were placed so they could be seen from the street, Rankines said.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
A Facebook friend put up his Christmas tree Monday, then wondered how he and his wife could ever celebrate, given what happened at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Thinking about the families of those 20 kids killed in Newtown, Conn., brought them back to the death of their own child, lost years before to a birth defect. "I just want to get through this year," he said. Between the deaths of his mother and his wife's father, and then the suicide of a nephew home from Afghanistan, the couple went to more funerals than birthday parties.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
PITTSBURGH - An elementary school music teacher shot his ex-wife while she played the organ during a Sunday church service, then returned minutes later to shoot her again and ensure she was dead before congregants stopped and grabbed him, police said. The shooting was detailed in a criminal complaint filed Monday against Gregory Eldred, 52, of Coudersport, who remained jailed without bond on first-degree murder and other charges in the shooting at the First United Presbyterian Church of Coudersport, about 140 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.
SPORTS
April 9, 2012 | BY CHUCK BAUSMAN, bausmac@phillynews.com
THE ODDEST STORY in sports this past year went from the football field to an Easter Sunday pulpit. Tim Tebow, newly minted New York Jets backup quarterback and previously anointed savior of anything he touches, attracted 15,000 people to an outdoor church service in Georgetown, Texas. "In Christianity, it's the Pope and Tebow right now," pastor Joe Champion said in an Associated Press report. "We didn't have enough room to handle the Pope. " Tebow is deeply religious and doesn't hide it. Quite the opposite.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tonight and Thursday night, two area singers will compete to keep their American Idol dreams alive. Six-foot-eight Jermaine Jones of Pine Hill, called a "gentle giant" by judge Jennifer Lopez, last week impressed in Las Vegas with his deep and soulful duet of "Make It Easy on Yourself" with a Texas "cowboy. " Lancaster native Naomi Gillies, who went to a Philadelphia private school, made it to Hollywood performing judge Steven Tyler's "Crying," and most recently advanced as part of a trio that did throwbacks "Mr. Sandman" and "Mr. Postman.
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