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NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE United Methodist Church in Parkesburg, Chester County, needed a shot in the arm, Lavonne Alice Dean was there with the needle. Metaphorically speaking, of course, but Lavonne was a key to the rejuvenation of a church that sorely needed help. Its congregation had diminished to the point that there was a real chance it might go out of business. But Lavonne dived in with her customary energy and devotion, and helped the Rev. Mark Deideman get the institution back on its feet to make it the thriving center of worship it is today.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Devon Prep coach Jeff Jewitt calls Andrew Shannon a pretty heady soccer player. So when Shannon found the ball at his feet Wednesday as the final seconds of the first half ticked away, he knew he had to take a shot, even if the angle seemed impossible. Good idea. Shannon's sharp-angle shot from the right side sneaked in by the near post. That turned out to be the difference in fourth-seeded Devon Prep's 2-1 win over visiting, No. 5 Church Farm in the District 1 Class A quarterfinals.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALDAN A Delaware County church is kicking out its Boy Scout troop after 93 years because the Boy Scouts of America now allows gay youth to be scouts. "We try to have the authority being in the Scriptures rather than ourselves," said the Rev. Paul Thompson, pastor at Aldan Union Church. "We believe that among those sins is the sin of homosexuality. " Thompson said the 21 members of the nondenominational church's board of elders voted nearly unanimously to end the church's sponsorship of Aldan Pack 2 and Troop 2, the Cub Scout and Boy Scout units it chartered nearly a century ago. Thompson said the elders, a group of men responsible for making spiritual decisions, were troubled not only by the fact that the Boy Scouts would now permit gay children and teenagers to join, but by the manner in which that decision was made - a poll of scout leaders nationwide.
REAL_ESTATE
October 14, 2013 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
When Val Nehez and Anthony Tyler visited Falls United Methodist Church in 2006, after learning that the former East Falls place of worship and its adjacent rectory were for sale, "there were still prayer books in the pews," she says. The couple immediately made an offer, with plans to transform the church, which had closed a year earlier, into office space for rent and the rectory (half a twin) into their family home. "I was hesitant," Tyler says, "but Val had the vision. " It wasn't a leap of faith.
SPORTS
October 4, 2013 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Church Farm senior Miles Bernhard is keeping his options open when it comes to where he might play in college next year. If he keeps playing like he did Wednesday afternoon, those options should be plentiful. Bernhard scored four of his five goals in the first half, including a rocket high into the net from 35 yards, and Church Farm rolled over visiting Morrisville, 7-0, in a Bicentennial League boys' soccer game. Suburban One Continental. Broock Weiss scored the winner early in the second half, and visiting Central Bucks East edged Central Bucks West, 1-0, to take control of first place in the conference.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CHURCH OF the Advocate made national history when the Rev. Paul Washington allowed the ordination at the North Philadelphia church of the first 11 women as Episcopal priests. That was in 1974. Two years later, the national church finally approved what had been an unauthorized ordination. The church, at 18th and Diamond streets, became known as a gathering place for what some considered to be controversial meetings on the heels of the civil-rights movement. In 1968 and again in 1970, the church, designed in the Gothic Revival style of a European cathedral, opened its doors for both the National Conference on Black Power and the Black Panther Convention.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE FIRST Church of Christ, Scientist, is a long, lovely building that sits on a picturesque stretch of Pine Street near 19th in Center City. For decades, the redbrick church with a steep pitched roof and Gothic windows offered congregants a peaceful, quaint retreat from the hustle of city streets. But the high cost of upkeep and dwindling attendance prompted members this summer to put it up for sale. Churchgoers celebrated their final Sunday service last month and now are renting space at the Independence Seaport Museum on Penn's Landing, as they search for a cheaper, permanent place to worship.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
THE OTHER day, my friend Harold asked me if Pope Francis, like certain Colorado legislators, could be forced out in a recall election. He knows I'm a conservative and apparently heard from some very reliable sources (none of whom have their headquarters on Mount Sinai) that the current pontiff is a liberal. Hal doesn't have a dog in this race, since he's Jewish. He is, however, a very smart man and was interested in knowing how the rank-and-file Catholics feel about our new gadfly of a leader.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRANKLIN TWP. Twenty-five years ago, Kathie Ramos married her husband at St. Mary's, a small, decades-old redbrick church resembling a schoolhouse. The couple's five children were baptized there. "It's a quaint little church, but it has a lot of spirituality," said Ramos, a stay-at-home mother. On Thursday, she and other parishioners were saddened to discover that several stone statues were vandalized at the small Franklin Township church. Priests here have ministered to generations, including at least one member whose ancestors from Italy helped erect the building.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE REV. Arthur Price Jr., pastor of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., was born in Philadelphia just two years after the church was forever linked with one of the darkest days in the nation's civil-rights history. That morning, Sept. 15, 1963, a bomb blast at 10:22 a.m. killed four young girls who were in Sunday School. The girls - Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley, all 14, and Denise McNair, 11 - were in a restroom combing their hair and getting ready for Youth Day services at 11 a.m. But 20 pounds of dynamite, set off by men affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan, shattered the church basement, sending bricks and glass flying everywhere.
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