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January 16, 2008
On Jan. 29, it will have been a year since 2006 Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro was euthanized after being so badly injured in the Preakness. Since Barbaro died, the colt's owners, Roy and Gretchen Jackson, have mulled where they would like to place Barbaro's ashes. Gretchen said yesterday they are getting close to a decision, but are not ready to reveal which way they might be leaning. Churchill Downs, where the colt was so dazzling in the Derby, is one logical destination, especially if the Jacksons want the public to have access to the site.
SPORTS
April 27, 2005 | INQUIRER STAFF
Possible Kentucky Derby favorite Afleet Alex worked five furlongs in 59 seconds yesterday at Churchill Downs in preparation for the May 7 Run for the Roses. The Delaware Park-based colt's fractions were 12 2/5 seconds, 24, 35 2/5, and 46 3/5, with a six-furlong gallop-out in 1 minute, 12 2/5 seconds. It was the fastest workout of the 29 horses going that distance and 1 2/5 seconds better than the second-fastest work. "Everything was exactly what we wanted," trainer Tim Ritchey told Bloodhorse.
SPORTS
November 10, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
The Kentucky State Veterinarian's office is investigating an unconfirmed case of West Nile virus at Churchill Downs. Rusty Ford, equine programs manager at the state veterinarian's office, told the track that preliminary test results on a horse that was euthanized last month indicated the animal suffered from West Nile virus, Churchill Downs said in a statement last night. Further tests were being conducted to confirm the diagnosis, and results should be available in a week to 10 days, the statement said.
SPORTS
March 3, 2009 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Nearly a year after the first fatal injury at America's most famous horse race, Churchill Downs announced yesterday it is beefing up safety requirements ahead of this year's Kentucky Derby. The company is enacting more than 20 changes, ranging from enhanced drug testing to limits on whips and racing ages, in time for the start of the spring meet at its signature track in Louisville, Ky. Other Churchill-owned tracks, including Arlington Park in Arlington Heights, Ill.; Calder Race Course in Miami Gardens, Fla.; and Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots in New Orleans, will follow by next year.
SPORTS
April 2, 2009 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Horse racing fans may hear the bugler's "Call to the Post" under the lights for the first time at Churchill Downs. The home of the Kentucky Derby is hoping to bring in temporary lights to experiment with 3 nights of racing for the upcoming spring meet. Churchill is seeking approval from the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, which meets next Tuesday. Track spokesman John Asher said yesterday that Churchill wants to "test the waters" with nighttime racing June 19 and June 26 - both Fridays - and Thursday, July 2. First post would be 6 p.m., and the 11 races each night would continue until about 11 p.m., he said.
SPORTS
June 16, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Every horse that races at Churchill Downs will have a full exam, including an endoscopic search of its nostrils for sponges, the Kentucky Racing Commission decided yesterday during an emergency meeting in Frankfort. The meeting was called after Churchill officials found a sponge in the nostril of Early Conquest before a race Thursday and in both nostrils of Class O Lad on Saturday. Both horses were the favorites in their races, and both came up short on the track. "It was a surprise and obviously bothersome to the racing community," said Bernie Hettel, the Kentucky Racing Commission's executive director and chief steward.
SPORTS
November 3, 2011 | BY DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - In the final days before the 2006 Kentucky Derby, Michael Matz could not contain his enthusiasm for Barbaro's chances. The colt looked so good on the track in the mornings that the trainer just knew Barbaro was sitting on the race of his life. No horse can glow quite as Barbaro did that spring, but when Union Rags arrived on the Churchill Downs surface yesterday at 8:30 a.m., the unbeaten 2-year-old looked plenty good enough. With the glare of the track's lights shining down on them, dozens of Breeders' Cup horses were on the track by 6 a.m. Matz waited for the sun until he brought the big horse out of Barn 22. With exercise rider Peter Brette aboard, Union Rags trailed stablemate Somali Lemonade as they walked around the outside of the track past the finish line to the paddock entrance.
SPORTS
March 15, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How fast is Pulpit, the newest racetrack sensation and future book Kentucky Derby favorite? So fast that only seven colts will face him in today's $500,000 Florida Derby, which equals the smallest field in 15 years. So fast that some rival trainers are just hoping for the second-place money of $95,000. So fast that, as a 2-year-old, Pulpit outran his bones and had to be taken out of training before he seriously hurt himself. Up to 30,000 spectators are expected at Gulfstream Park when the undefeated bay colt goes to post (Channel 6, 4:47 p.m.)
SPORTS
October 8, 2000 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As one of the shortest-priced favorites ever to compete in a stakes race at Philadelphia Park, Jostle drew away to a 4 1/2-length victory yesterday in the $200,000 Cotillion Handicap. The result was no surprise but just what her trainer had hoped for in preparation for the biggest test of her career. Jostle, the nation's leading 3-year-old filly, is stabled at Philadelphia Park, but she was making her first appearance there. Jostle, under Mike Smith, circled the field on the final turn with an impressive acceleration and fought off Gold For My Gal in the stretch to win the Grade II stakes.
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SPORTS
June 13, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
ELMONT, N.Y. - Irad Ortiz Jr. was already among America's best young jockeys. His ride in the Belmont Stakes on Saturday won't do anything but cement that position and perhaps put him in the conversation for best of any age. Riding 16-1 Creator for the first time after the Arkansas Derby winner finished 13th in the Kentucky Derby, Ortiz quickly got the colt to the rail from his extreme outside-post position in the 13-horse field. He patiently moved the horse from 10th on the backstretch to sixth by the quarter pole.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
THIRTEEN RACES, almost $8 million in purses, nine graded stakes (six Grade I), stretching over 8 1/2 hours Saturday at Belmont Park. It will be America's best racing card this year outside Breeders' Cup Saturday at Santa Anita. When the New York Racing Association management decided to bundle several of its historic stakes on one card three years ago, a mini Breeders' Cup is precisely what organizers had in mind for Belmont Stakes Day. It was great racing in 2014 and 2015, but largely overshadowed by the anticipation of potential Triple Crown runs by California Chrome and American Pharoah.
SPORTS
May 10, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, Staff Writer
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - It was 100 minutes after Nyquist had crossed the Kentucky Derby finish line alone when the lights went out in the Derby museum Saturday night, Doug O'Neill put his right arm around wife, Linette, and everybody in the crowd looked up at the 360-degree screen to watch The Greatest Race. This was the wonderful Day at the Derby film re-imagined from darkness to light and back to darkness with fresh video from the 2015 Derby interspersed with highlights of the original film.
SPORTS
September 18, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
TWO WEEKS AGO, Sam Elliott, the director of racing at Parx, got a text from Bob Baffert saying "get ready. " Before he began to hyperventilate, Elliott read the rest of the message and then called Baffert. It would really help, Baffert said, if the Pennsylvania Derby could be moved to Sept. 26. In any other year, the Pa. Derby probably would have been scheduled for Sept. 26 anyway. This was not any year, not with Pope Francis coming to town that day. Imagine. The Triple Crown winner this Saturday, the pope next Saturday.
SPORTS
August 3, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Pharoah's ending up at the Jersey Shore this weekend? No great surprise. His owner is from New Jersey, and his trainer has won this particular race so often they may eventually have to rename it the Baffert Invitational. For now it's still the Haskell, annually one of horse racing's most important summer stops, and Oceanport will be the center of the racing world again on Sunday. They're predicting up to 60,000 will invade Monmouth Park Racetrack to watch the Triple Crown winner in his first race after his historic Belmont Stakes triumph.
SPORTS
June 9, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ELMONT, N.Y. - Racetrack lifers, those who knew Bob Baffert well enough to wander inside Barn 1 at Belmont Park, congregated in a corner as American Pharoah walked around the shed row. One guy held Baffert's coffee while the trainer signed a Belmont Stakes program for him. Out on Hempstead Turnpike, just over a fence, traffic spilled by, past a Wendy's and a Subway across the street, which seemed a world away. Inside the fence, there was an air of contentment. Why would the glow wear off?
SPORTS
May 17, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - The Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes may be more glamorous, but it's the Preakness alone that can transform three distinct races into a Triple Crown. When Derby winners falter at Pimlico, the anticipation and curiosity that animate the three races disappears. Whatever happened at Churchill Downs two weeks earlier fades from memory. And June's climactic Belmont is instead anticlimactic. So, in addition to jockey Victor Espinoza, American Pharoah will carry that burden for the troubled sport late Saturday afternoon when he heads a bifurcated field of eight 3-year-olds in the 140th Preakness.
SPORTS
May 5, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - His two Kentucky Derby horses had been off the track and back in their stalls for an hour Wednesday morning. The day's work was done, but Bob Baffert was not inclined to leave, so the Hall of Fame trainer held court for a good hour. Even as the listeners dissipated to just a handful, Baffert kept talking, with or without questions. He was reliving his training life generally, his Derby life specifically - Cavonnier's nose loss in 1996 when he was sure he would never get another chance, the three wins in six years from 1997 to 2002, the terrible disappointment with Point Given in 2001.
SPORTS
May 1, 2015 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - If you do not have a betting interest in Saturday's Kentucky Derby, root for International Star. With 20 horses come 20 stories about the people who are around the horse. None is better than the story of Ken and Sarah Ramsey, the husband and wife team for 57 years who decided late in life to chase a horse racing dream and have beaten the odds in every way but one. The Ramseys grew up in Artemus, Ky. (pop. 500), down in the southeastern part of the state. Ken was a truck driver, which he parlayed into owning a trucking company followed by a real estate business and a bunch of cell towers.
SPORTS
May 19, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Each spring at Triple Crown time, when thoroughbred racing briefly flowers on the American sports landscape like an exquisite azalea, I think of Joe Bummer. His actual name escapes me these four-plus decades later, but I'm certain it couldn't have described him any better than the nickname my friends and I gave him. (The actual name we called him was a Yiddish word for perennial dissatisfaction, but after 40-some years I can neither pronounce nor recall it.) Joe was a railbird at Garden State Park and Brandywine Raceway.
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