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NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacob J. Roux, 76, the founder of an Olney printing company whose work for his parish brought him the affectionate nickname of "Mr. St. Joseph," died Sunday at Holy Redeemer Hospital. Mr. Roux was president of the General Envelope & Printing Co. at 740 W. Nedro Ave., which he founded in the early 1950s and ran until retiring not long ago. During his time away from the printing company, Mr. Roux was active in Cheltenham Township, where he had lived for more than 30 years. He enjoyed assisting the Montgomery County Republican Party and took a special interest in the affairs of the school board.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | by Joe Clark and Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writers
Services will be held today for John Richard Logan III, a dedicated churchman who formed several companies and enjoyed playing sports. Logan, who was born in South Philadelphia, was 52 when he died of cancer July 5 in Charlton, Mass., where he lived. Logan formed Mosaic Enterprises, Bottom-Line Technology and Micro Collections Systems while in Massachusetts. Bottom-Line was involved in the sales and marketing of medical products. Logan graduated from Friends Central School and earned a bachelor's degree from Wesleyan Uiversity.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY JESSICA GLAZER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
A DELAWARE COUNTY church deacon who teaches Sunday school was charged yesterday with possession of child pornography. Steven Almond, 54, of Parkside, had more than 50 videos of child porn on his computer, including clips of children who appeared to be younger than 5 years old, a police investigation found. Almond is a deacon at Middletown Presbyterian Church and coaches basketball in the Upward Bound Basketball League. A detective conducting an online investigation discovered that Almond downloaded two videos between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. June 6. According to a police affidavit, one video depicted a man performing sexual acts and having intercourse with a girl between 10 and 12 years old, and a second video showed a girl around the same age touching herself.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Billy Ford loved to dance. But his extra left foot kept getting in the way. "He had a dance no one else knew how to do," Sheila Isaacs, a niece, fondly recalled. "He always wanted to dance. I remember as a child I never wanted to dance with him because he danced so funny. " So funny, in fact, that the family had a name for his funky moves. They called it "The Offbeat. " William H. Ford, a retired cement mason and dedicated churchman who was married just last November, died of cancer Tuesday.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN MARTIN Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington in August 1963, Joseph K. Reed was among the nearly 300,000 who heard him. Joseph was part of the local delegation to the march representing the rights of labor, urging "jobs and freedom. " A longtime civil-rights activist, Joseph didn't hesitate to collar anyone he thought would hear out his opinions on politics, the rights of man and the need for spiritual attainment. Joseph Clark, a longtime electrician for the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, an Army veteran of the Korean War, an active churchman and a devoted family patriarch, died March 6 at age 85. "Joseph was the cornerstone of his family and instrumental in nurturing everyone's life he encountered," his family said.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sherman A. Harmon, 77, former community relations director for the Redevelopment Authority of Philadelphia and a YMCA executive, died Tuesday at his home in West Mount Airy. Mr. Harmon began working for the Redevelopment Authority in 1957 as an information officer and retired in 1982 as community relations director. Before that he held executive positions with YMCAs in Pittsburgh, Dallas and Philadelphia. He came to Philadelphia's Christian Street Y in 1948 as program-membership secretary.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Klauder, 91, a business executive and churchman who helped found the Franklin Mint and the Chapel of the Four Chaplains, died Monday at his home in New Smyrna Beach, Fla., where he had lived since 1989. He formerly lived on Rittenhouse Square. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Klauder left school at about age 16 to work in the commercial department of a law firm that became Jenkins, Bennett & Jenkins. He worked his way up to manager of the department and was with the company until 1982.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
EDGAR HENDERSON, a general contractor whose company was involved in numerous renovation projects around the city, a devoted churchman and family patriarch, died Jan. 9. He was 87 and lived in Mount Airy. A native of Rankin County, Miss., Edgar came to Philadelphia, earned a GED and graduated from Temple University with a degree in architecture and design. He started E. Henderson Inc. in 1960, and built it into a thriving construction company that had 15 employees when he closed it in 2008.
SPORTS
September 23, 1996 | By David T. Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
History might have a way of repeating itself, and for Episcopal Academy's Matt Bailer, that's just fine. For Chestnut Hill Academy, however, the Blue Devils will be happy never to see the Churchman again. As he did just one year ago, Bailer had a career game Friday in Episcopal's 27-7 nonleague rout of the host Blue Devils. The senior tailback amassed 200 yards rushing on 12 carries, and scored three touchdowns, one coming when he returned an interception 96 yards for a score.
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Cardone Sr., 78, a coal miner's son who came to Philadelphia in 1934 as a mechanic and built an auto parts company into the city's largest private manufacturer, died Wednesday in his Huntingdon Valley home. Cardone Industries, whose products are distributed under the name A-1 Remanufacturing, employs more than 2,200 people at several sites in North and Northeast Philadelphia. "A real Horatio Alger story," said Common Pleas Court Judge Joseph C. Bruno, who knew Mr. Cardone for 58 years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SAYS something about Kelly Morris that his funeral was attended by nearly 1,000 people, that SEPTA, his employer, had to use two buses to bring co-workers to the services. What it says is that Kelly James Morris was an exceptional human being, a man who captured the hearts and esteem of just about everybody he came in contact with. He was a man who could never pass up a chance to help a person who needed his special brand of love and caring, be it the children of neighbors, family or friends who needed a surrogate dad, the elderly, the hungry, prisoners - the full spectrum of human need.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TALK ABOUT devotion! David McAllister and his family would travel 130 miles round-trip every Sunday from their home in Sinking Spring, Berks County, to South Philadelphia to attend church. But to be fair, David did warn the pastor of Solid Rock Baptist, at 19th and Federal, that he probably wouldn't show up if the Eagles were playing. Why the long trek to church? "He felt it was important to stay close to the community where he grew up," said his wife, Georgette. "And he wanted his family to be role models for the children of the old neighborhood.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN MARTIN Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington in August 1963, Joseph K. Reed was among the nearly 300,000 who heard him. Joseph was part of the local delegation to the march representing the rights of labor, urging "jobs and freedom. " A longtime civil-rights activist, Joseph didn't hesitate to collar anyone he thought would hear out his opinions on politics, the rights of man and the need for spiritual attainment. Joseph Clark, a longtime electrician for the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, an Army veteran of the Korean War, an active churchman and a devoted family patriarch, died March 6 at age 85. "Joseph was the cornerstone of his family and instrumental in nurturing everyone's life he encountered," his family said.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVERY CHRISTMAS, Woodrow Millhouse Sr. would buy a couple of cases of apples and oranges and pass them out to friends, family and whomever needed them. Keeping the Christmas spirit like that was typical of Woodrow, who cared deeply about people and sought to help them whenever he could. Woodrow Millhouse Sr., who seemed to thrive on the hard work of construction labor and grave digging throughout his working career, a devoted family man and church worker, died March 9 of heart failure.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY JESSICA GLAZER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
A DELAWARE COUNTY church deacon who teaches Sunday school was charged yesterday with possession of child pornography. Steven Almond, 54, of Parkside, had more than 50 videos of child porn on his computer, including clips of children who appeared to be younger than 5 years old, a police investigation found. Almond is a deacon at Middletown Presbyterian Church and coaches basketball in the Upward Bound Basketball League. A detective conducting an online investigation discovered that Almond downloaded two videos between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. June 6. According to a police affidavit, one video depicted a man performing sexual acts and having intercourse with a girl between 10 and 12 years old, and a second video showed a girl around the same age touching herself.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
EDGAR HENDERSON, a general contractor whose company was involved in numerous renovation projects around the city, a devoted churchman and family patriarch, died Jan. 9. He was 87 and lived in Mount Airy. A native of Rankin County, Miss., Edgar came to Philadelphia, earned a GED and graduated from Temple University with a degree in architecture and design. He started E. Henderson Inc. in 1960, and built it into a thriving construction company that had 15 employees when he closed it in 2008.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Bridgman Churchman III, 89, of Gladwyne, a retired insurance executive, died Sunday, Nov. 20, of pneumonia at Lankenau Hospital. In 1947, Mr. Churchman joined the Guardian Life Insurance Co. in Philadelphia. He later told an Inquirer reporter, "I went into the insurance business, where literally anybody could get a job," and noted that salesmen were paid solely on commission. He told The Inquirer in 1986 that he got into management "by default," after peddling insurance door to door in Levittown.
SPORTS
December 18, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The burning question this season in Inter-Ac League basketball is not which team will win the championship. It's this: Can anyone prevent Germantown Academy from again going 10-0? Just handing a team a title is always dangerous, of course, but the Patriots' starting lineup includes four Division I talents and all were prominent last season. Point guard Mike Slattery is a Delaware signee (though he injured his wrist in practice Friday and X-rays were inconclusive; he'll be evaluated again today)
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Billy Ford loved to dance. But his extra left foot kept getting in the way. "He had a dance no one else knew how to do," Sheila Isaacs, a niece, fondly recalled. "He always wanted to dance. I remember as a child I never wanted to dance with him because he danced so funny. " So funny, in fact, that the family had a name for his funky moves. They called it "The Offbeat. " William H. Ford, a retired cement mason and dedicated churchman who was married just last November, died of cancer Tuesday.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Johnny Stilley Jr., a dedicated churchman and home team fan who made his mark wherever he went, died Saturday of cancer. He was 49 and had lived in Cedarhurst for about 13 years. Stilley was most recently a caseworker for the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, a position he held since 1990. But the dapper deacon spent most of his career as a manager or salesman in various clothing stores and he had the wardrobe to prove it. His eye for fashion, class and detail also served him well during the late 1970s to mid-'80s when he and two partners operated Charisma I, a Center City theatrical and modeling agency.
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