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Chutney

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FOOD
December 20, 2012
Makes 10 servings 2 navel oranges, split and sliced as thinly as possible into half-circles. 1/2 quart water 1 cup sugar 1/2 tablespoon toasted and ground coriander seed 1/2 tablespoon toasted and ground cumin seed 1/2 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon toasted and ground caraway seed 1. Combine the water, sugar, and spices and bring to a boil. Place the orange slices in a large metal mixing bowl and pour the spice syrup over the slices. 2. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature until cool, at least 4 hours.
FOOD
November 1, 2007
We may paraphrase the Eagles fight song, but you'll want to sing along with this festive musical fork. In the pan or on the grill, it's the latest in usable/collectible tailgating toys for Green Team fans. (A musical bottle opener is $8.95.) Brandy-Wine by the Can Bucolic Chester County has always represented the epitome of "barn chic. " Now it has a theme wine with a cleverly rustic twist on wine-in-a-box. Up-and-coming Paradocx Vineyard fits the equivalent of four bottles of wine into its "White Wash" and "Barn Red" cans.
FOOD
April 16, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Best of Gourmet (Random House, $24.95) is the first in what the publisher calls an annual series that will recap a year of Gourmet magazine's menus and selected recipes. The first part of the handsome, oversize hardback contains 24 menus that cover a year's worth of entertaining. Color photographs illustrate the various dishes - from a New Year's dinner for two to a Thanksgiving feast for many. Each menu also suggests accompanying wines. A recipe compendium forms the second section of the book and covers numerous preparations, from from hors d'oeuvres to desserts.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For sheer elegance of cuisine and setting, the new Indian restaurant Akbar is hard to beat. Open only two months, Akbar offers an extensive menu of exotically flavored dishes that represent the best of one of the world's most subtle cuisines. Among Akbar's culinary treasures are eight varieties of the delicious breads that make Indian cuisine so outstanding. Sweet-tasting onion paratha ($3.50) was piping-hot layers of soft, pitalike bread flecked with sweet onions, while paneer paratha (also $3.50)
NEWS
July 22, 2010
10 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 1/4 cups sugar 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon lavender buds cup plus 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all-purpose flour Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Put sugar and lavender buds in a food processor and pulse together. Set a double boiler or a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water. Add butter, lavender sugar, cocoa and salt, stirring occasionally until the butter melts and the mixture becomes fairly smooth and hot. Remove from heat and let cool until the mixture is warm.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Indian cuisine deserves ranking with the great cuisines of the world, if for no other reason than the incredible variety of spices used in it. From intoxicating garam masala to heady curry with fenugreek and asafetida in between, Indian cooking has the potential to turn even the most humble food into something special. That said, it is rare that one finds the food in Indian restaurants up to the level it can be. For the most part, such fare is roughly where Italian cooking was in the 1950s, meaning not far beyond the spaghetti-and-meatball stage.
FOOD
August 13, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! A friend and I recently dined at Rajbhog, an Indian vegetarian restaurant on Adams Avenue in the Northeast. Being first-timers, we enlisted the help of the waitress. Everything was delicious, especially the breads. I would love to know how to make the savory sponge cake called dhokla. It was served cut in small squares and was light and yummy. Gina Gardner Philadelphia Dear Gina, The full name of the dish is khaman dhokla. It is a light, steamed split-pea pancake made with yogurt and spices in the batter.
FOOD
April 25, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Food Writer
Yellow Springs has made a name for itself in Chester Springs with aged goat cheeses that exude subtle complexity. But their unique sense of place is also unmistakable, and not only because of the natural yeasts and molds floating around the 160-year-old fieldstone barn where Al and Catherine Renzi have made their farmstead cheeses for the last four years. Al also takes cues from his farm's bounty, like the black walnuts (soaked in Nocino liqueur) for his Nutcracker. But my favorite is Red Leaf, an unusual firm puck aged inside native sycamore leaves soaked in red wine.
FOOD
April 13, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
What's Cooking in Philadelphia ($12) is the local Rotary Club chapter's offering of recipes representing the city's diverse ethnic background, along with a compilation of basic historical information about the City of Brotherly Love. Some of the recipes are of the family-heirloom type, adapted to the contemporary kitchen. Also included are the traditional Philadelphia favorites, such as scrapple, fish-house punch, pepper pot and sticky buns. The book zeroes in on neighboring locales with recipes such as Chester County Meatloaf, and has a number of Pennsylvania Dutch dishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2010
Good cooking starts with good chopping. Not to mention mincing and dicing. If you aren't sure you can make these or other cuts, sign up to learn "Essential Knife Skills" at Sur La Table (690 W. Dekalb Pike, King of Prussia, 484-612-0046). You'll also learn how to select a knife and get tips for keeping knives sharp and well-maintained. The fee is $59; class times are 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; June 30 or July 28. Get a knife sharpened for free at the K-of-P store July 1-31. Meritage (20th and Lombard streets, 215-985-1922)
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FOOD
April 25, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Food Writer
Yellow Springs has made a name for itself in Chester Springs with aged goat cheeses that exude subtle complexity. But their unique sense of place is also unmistakable, and not only because of the natural yeasts and molds floating around the 160-year-old fieldstone barn where Al and Catherine Renzi have made their farmstead cheeses for the last four years. Al also takes cues from his farm's bounty, like the black walnuts (soaked in Nocino liqueur) for his Nutcracker. But my favorite is Red Leaf, an unusual firm puck aged inside native sycamore leaves soaked in red wine.
FOOD
December 20, 2012
Makes 10 servings 2 navel oranges, split and sliced as thinly as possible into half-circles. 1/2 quart water 1 cup sugar 1/2 tablespoon toasted and ground coriander seed 1/2 tablespoon toasted and ground cumin seed 1/2 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon toasted and ground caraway seed 1. Combine the water, sugar, and spices and bring to a boil. Place the orange slices in a large metal mixing bowl and pour the spice syrup over the slices. 2. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature until cool, at least 4 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
Everyone I know who visits southern India comes back with a taste for the region's street food called dosa. It's a paper-thin crepe filled with a spicy potato filling. Barring a trip into Manhattan, Philadelphia dosa lovers were left to their dosa memories. No longer so. Nirav Mehta and partner Baldev Singh (who owns two northern Indian restaurants outside the city) took the concept and created Philadelphia Chutney Company. The first location just opened off Rittenhouse Square, and more of these healthy, inexpensive fast-food operations are planned for some university locations.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
10 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 1/4 cups sugar 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon lavender buds cup plus 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all-purpose flour Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Put sugar and lavender buds in a food processor and pulse together. Set a double boiler or a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water. Add butter, lavender sugar, cocoa and salt, stirring occasionally until the butter melts and the mixture becomes fairly smooth and hot. Remove from heat and let cool until the mixture is warm.
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By JENNIFER GRAUE, Contra Costa Times (MCT)
WITH ITS delicate purple flowers and woodsy-floral scent, lavender has been better known for its role in bath and relaxation products than for its culinary uses. That's changing, as lavender pops up in restaurants across the nation. Ed Higgins, the chef at Quattro, at Palo Alto's Four Seasons, in California, attributes lavender's rising popularity to the growing number of chefs who tend their own restaurant gardens. "It's easy to care for," he said. "You have both buds and flowers to work with as a flavor component and as a garnish.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2010
Good cooking starts with good chopping. Not to mention mincing and dicing. If you aren't sure you can make these or other cuts, sign up to learn "Essential Knife Skills" at Sur La Table (690 W. Dekalb Pike, King of Prussia, 484-612-0046). You'll also learn how to select a knife and get tips for keeping knives sharp and well-maintained. The fee is $59; class times are 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; June 30 or July 28. Get a knife sharpened for free at the K-of-P store July 1-31. Meritage (20th and Lombard streets, 215-985-1922)
FOOD
April 2, 2009 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
At Passover seders at Joan Nathan's home, guests tour the world through haroset. Nathan, the food journalist and cookbook author who specializes in international Jewish cooking, serves at least five different harosets at her annual feast because she believes that presenting an assortment of the fruit-and-nut dish demonstrates the Diaspora of the Jews. "I use my seders as teaching mechanisms, to show through food where Jews have gone in the world. Every haroset has a history," says Nathan.
FOOD
November 1, 2007
We may paraphrase the Eagles fight song, but you'll want to sing along with this festive musical fork. In the pan or on the grill, it's the latest in usable/collectible tailgating toys for Green Team fans. (A musical bottle opener is $8.95.) Brandy-Wine by the Can Bucolic Chester County has always represented the epitome of "barn chic. " Now it has a theme wine with a cleverly rustic twist on wine-in-a-box. Up-and-coming Paradocx Vineyard fits the equivalent of four bottles of wine into its "White Wash" and "Barn Red" cans.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | By Lenore Skenazy
Item: On June 16, two computer hard drives containing nuclear secrets that disappeared at Los Alamos last month resurfaced under questionable circumstances behind a copying machine. "Questionable" circumstances? They poke around the office twice, find the disks their third time out, and this they consider suspicious? Does the FBI have any idea how long it takes most people to find their glasses? Not to mention their remotes? It took me an entire weekend of thrashing, gnashing and glancing darkly at the nefarious suspects - particularly my 2-year-old - before I found my broom, for gosh sake.
FOOD
August 13, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! A friend and I recently dined at Rajbhog, an Indian vegetarian restaurant on Adams Avenue in the Northeast. Being first-timers, we enlisted the help of the waitress. Everything was delicious, especially the breads. I would love to know how to make the savory sponge cake called dhokla. It was served cut in small squares and was light and yummy. Gina Gardner Philadelphia Dear Gina, The full name of the dish is khaman dhokla. It is a light, steamed split-pea pancake made with yogurt and spices in the batter.
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