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NEWS
May 27, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC HEALTH Let's call a cigarette a cigarette I applaud the Food and Drug Administration's recent ruling to ban e-cigarette sales to minors and require safety reviews for vaping products ("Thank you for not vaping?" May 17). Like traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain nicotine, an extremely addictive substance. And e-cigarette products have been found to contain harmful chemicals than can cause respiratory disease. Should we be asking the public to "pick their poison," or should we be educating them that no matter what type of cigarette they smoke, they are putting their health at risk?
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal deficit is huge and out of control, just like a "gigantic orgasm," Sen. Dennis DeConcini declared yesterday. The Arizona Democrat made the pronouncement at a news conference to endorse a balanced budget amendment. He apparently intended to say "organism. " Instead, DeConcini said he expected the amendment to be approved and that "it's going to be a great day because we're going to finally wrestle to the ground this gigantic orgasm that is just out of control, that just absolutely can't put itself together.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
More than 400 localities impose their own taxes. Highest combined state, local taxes* 1. New York City ($1.50) + N.Y. state ($4.35) . . . $5.85 2. Chicago ($0.68) + Cook County ($3) + Ill. ($1.98) . . . $5.66 3. Evanston, Ill. ($0.50)** . . . $5.48 4. Cicero, Ill. ($0.16)** . . . $5.14 5. Rosemont, Ill. ($0.05)** . . . $5.03 6. Rest of Cook County ($3) + Ill. ($1.98) . . . $4.98 7. Rest of New York state ($4.35) . . . $4.35 8. Bethel, Ala. ($2.21)
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | By Noel Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The East Greenwich Township Committee unanimously adopted an ordinance last night to ban all cigarette vending machines and self-serve racks in the township in an effort to battle juvenile smoking. East Greenwich becomes the first municipality in Gloucester County to ban self-serve racks, which typically are displayed in the front of counters making cigarettes easily accessible to minors, said Laura Steinmetz of the East Greenwich Municipal Alliance for the Prevention of Alcohol and Drug Abuse.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The head of cigarette-maker Philip Morris International Inc. told a cancer nurse yesterday that although cigarettes are "harmful" and "addictive," it is not that hard to quit. CEO Louis C. Camilleri's statement was in response to comments at its annual shareholder meeting in New York. The nurse, later identified as Elisabeth Gundersen from the University of California-San Francisco, cited statistics that tobacco use kills more than 400,000 Americans and 5 million people worldwide each year.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | By RICHARD COHEN
Public television's Charlie Rose devoted part of a recent show to the poet Joseph Brodsky, the Nobel laureate who died in January. Brodsky was a genius who wrote originally in Russian and, later, after he was exiled from the Soviet Union and came to the United States, in English. He was a sick man with an abiding heart condition and habit he could not break. At only 55 he died - still a smoker. That, anyway, was the testimony of a fellow poet and friend, Anthony Hecht, a Pulitzer-Prize winner and not a man, it seems, given to trivial observations.
NEWS
June 2, 2002
Just a year after they tried but failed to gut enforcement of Pennsylvania's under-18 ban on tobacco sales, dozens of Harrisburg lawmakers are at it again. Under the guise of toughening penalties for selling cigarettes, cigars and chewing tobacco to under-age teens, a House-approved measure would let most retailers off the hook. To duck new, higher fines for under-age sales, all retailers would have to prove is that they posted signs and informed their store clerks about the under-18 ban. With that defense available to them periodically, retailers pretty much have the right to shrug off the whole youth-smoking problem.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The manslaughter trial ended to the delight of the spectators with a surprise witness and the apprehension of the real culprit. The event was such a hit that it was restaged so it could be videotaped as a lesson for others. The trial, The Smoker vs. The Croaker, was a play written by three eighth- grade students at the Mary B. Volz Junior High School in Runnemede. It was first presented last November in conjunction with The Great American Smokeout to an audience of junior high students.
NEWS
July 12, 1996 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Millions of Americans have used a simple but effective method to quit smoking. Here's how they did it. They said: "I quit. " And they did. They didn't chew nicotine-laced gum. They didn't put nicotine patches on their arms. They didn't join support groups, go to a clinic, consult a shrink, or undergo hypnosis or acupuncture. They just decided putting smoke in their lungs was bad for their health, and stopped doing it. Was it easy? No. Each experienced some discomfort.
SPORTS
April 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - It was, in many ways, the perfect homage to someone who had been celebrated for his singular style, for his cool, for a Philadelphia lifetime known as Harry the K. Shane Victorino, Ryan Howard, Scott Eyre and several other Phillies players couldn't possibly find a truckload of pastel sportcoats to highjack on such short notice so they did the next best thing, sharing a cigarette in the dugout before yesterday's game at Nationals Park....
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
The budget-balancing $1-per-pack cigarette tax increase that takes effect Aug. 1 will make Pennsylvania's $2.60 levy the 10th-highest in the nation. New Jersey's $2.70 per pack is ninth. In Philadelphia, the tax will be $4.60 per pack, which includes a $2 surcharge added two years ago to help close a looming School District deficit. The combined state and local tax will make Philadelphia's the third highest among the nation's big cities, after Chicago's $6.16 per pack and New York's $5.85.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - There may soon be a budget bill, but there is no budget deal. The proposal that cleared the House Appropriations Committee on Monday night calls for the state to spend about 5 percent more next year than it did under this year's $30 billion budget. The boost in spending would be propped up by legalizing online gambling, loosening the state's monopoly over the sale of wine, imposing new taxes on tobacco, and instituting a tax amnesty program. But neither the GOP-dominated Senate nor the administration of the Democratic governor have committed to support it. Jeff Sheridan, Gov. Wolf's spokesman, said Monday that the governor had not agreed to the plan.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
ISSUE | SMOKING Protect students As a high school student, I know tobacco companies market their products to me and my friends. Their latest tactic is to target us with products such as cigars and e-cigarettes. They use sweet flavors like gummy bear and watermelon and create slick ads to make these products seem cool. Unfortunately, these tactics are working. A new study by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that more high school boys in Pennsylvania smoke cigars than smoke cigarettes - 18.2 percent vs. 14.9 percent.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC HEALTH Let's call a cigarette a cigarette I applaud the Food and Drug Administration's recent ruling to ban e-cigarette sales to minors and require safety reviews for vaping products ("Thank you for not vaping?" May 17). Like traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain nicotine, an extremely addictive substance. And e-cigarette products have been found to contain harmful chemicals than can cause respiratory disease. Should we be asking the public to "pick their poison," or should we be educating them that no matter what type of cigarette they smoke, they are putting their health at risk?
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Terron L. Phillips had just bought a pack of cigarettes from an East Camden gas station late last Wednesday and was walking home when a red SUV approached him. Four males, ages 16 to 19, were inside, authorities said. The youngest held a sawed-off shotgun. He stepped out of the car with Raquan Handon, 18, and tried to rob Phillips, investigators said. Phillips, 19, told them he had nothing. Handon searched his pockets, found only the cigarettes, and walked back to the SUV holding them, authorities said.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
Philadelphia police are seeking three men who snuck into a North Philadelphia warehouse last week and stole 24 cases of cigarettes worth about $64,000, police said Monday. In a video released by police, three men are seen approaching the warehouse on the 100 block of East Hunting Park Avenue with a ladder at about 2:35 a.m. Friday. In the dark, they pried open a rear door, then went inside and stole the loot, police said. They then fled in an unknown direction. A black market in "loosies" and cheaper butts has expanded after the city imposed an additional tax of $2 a pack to help fund schools.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
WITH THE proposed 3-cent-per-ounce sugary-drink tax on the table to fund universal pre-K and a couple of other things, I took a trip back in time to look at the $2-a-pack tax on cigarettes that began in October 2014. There are two questions: First, did it produce the expected revenue? Second, what was the effect on sales? The first was easy to answer, the second less so. I was not a fan of the $2-a-pack tax, and not just because I was a smoker. Acting on principle, I quit smoking after the $2 tax was imposed.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
A few years ago, federal health officials proposed replacing the familiar warning labels on cigarette packs with vivid photos showing tobacco damage, such as rotted teeth and diseased lungs. Tobacco companies cried foul with a 2012 lawsuit, and a federal court agreed the graphic labels did "not convey any warning information at all" and were "unabashed attempts to evoke emotion (and perhaps embarrassment) and browbeat consumers into quitting. " But new research from the University of Pennsylvania and Ohio State University shows those emotional images do indeed turn more people away from smoking.
NEWS
October 20, 2015
ISSUE | CIGARETTE TAX An effective tool to combat smoking The commentary attacking cigarette taxes ("Cigarette-tax increases are bad for Pa. business," Wednesday) contained several inaccuracies. Studies have shown that cigarette taxes are an effective strategy for decreasing smoking and reducing smoking-related diseases and deaths. Research also shows that higher tobacco prices help to prevent people, particularly youths, from starting to smoke. While it is true that higher taxes lead some smokers to cross state or county lines for lower prices, most of those who continue smoking neither travel out of state nor seek smugglers to buy cigarettes.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moments after buying some Advil and bottled water at a Suburban Station newsstand, Serena Starnes realized that she was out of cigarettes. She quickly went back and paid $9.50 for a pack of Newports. Had Starnes been in the suburbs, she would have paid much less because of the city's $2-a-pack tax earmarked for city schools. The extra $2 stings, but at least the money is going to help educate her children, the unemployed barber said. "It's good because it's going toward the schools," the mother of nine said.
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