CollectionsCigarette
IN THE NEWS

Cigarette

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The head of cigarette-maker Philip Morris International Inc. told a cancer nurse yesterday that although cigarettes are "harmful" and "addictive," it is not that hard to quit. CEO Louis C. Camilleri's statement was in response to comments at its annual shareholder meeting in New York. The nurse, later identified as Elisabeth Gundersen from the University of California-San Francisco, cited statistics that tobacco use kills more than 400,000 Americans and 5 million people worldwide each year.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal deficit is huge and out of control, just like a "gigantic orgasm," Sen. Dennis DeConcini declared yesterday. The Arizona Democrat made the pronouncement at a news conference to endorse a balanced budget amendment. He apparently intended to say "organism. " Instead, DeConcini said he expected the amendment to be approved and that "it's going to be a great day because we're going to finally wrestle to the ground this gigantic orgasm that is just out of control, that just absolutely can't put itself together.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
More than 400 localities impose their own taxes. Highest combined state, local taxes* 1. New York City ($1.50) + N.Y. state ($4.35) . . . $5.85 2. Chicago ($0.68) + Cook County ($3) + Ill. ($1.98) . . . $5.66 3. Evanston, Ill. ($0.50)** . . . $5.48 4. Cicero, Ill. ($0.16)** . . . $5.14 5. Rosemont, Ill. ($0.05)** . . . $5.03 6. Rest of Cook County ($3) + Ill. ($1.98) . . . $4.98 7. Rest of New York state ($4.35) . . . $4.35 8. Bethel, Ala. ($2.21)
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | By Noel Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The East Greenwich Township Committee unanimously adopted an ordinance last night to ban all cigarette vending machines and self-serve racks in the township in an effort to battle juvenile smoking. East Greenwich becomes the first municipality in Gloucester County to ban self-serve racks, which typically are displayed in the front of counters making cigarettes easily accessible to minors, said Laura Steinmetz of the East Greenwich Municipal Alliance for the Prevention of Alcohol and Drug Abuse.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | By RICHARD COHEN
Public television's Charlie Rose devoted part of a recent show to the poet Joseph Brodsky, the Nobel laureate who died in January. Brodsky was a genius who wrote originally in Russian and, later, after he was exiled from the Soviet Union and came to the United States, in English. He was a sick man with an abiding heart condition and habit he could not break. At only 55 he died - still a smoker. That, anyway, was the testimony of a fellow poet and friend, Anthony Hecht, a Pulitzer-Prize winner and not a man, it seems, given to trivial observations.
NEWS
June 2, 2002
Just a year after they tried but failed to gut enforcement of Pennsylvania's under-18 ban on tobacco sales, dozens of Harrisburg lawmakers are at it again. Under the guise of toughening penalties for selling cigarettes, cigars and chewing tobacco to under-age teens, a House-approved measure would let most retailers off the hook. To duck new, higher fines for under-age sales, all retailers would have to prove is that they posted signs and informed their store clerks about the under-18 ban. With that defense available to them periodically, retailers pretty much have the right to shrug off the whole youth-smoking problem.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The manslaughter trial ended to the delight of the spectators with a surprise witness and the apprehension of the real culprit. The event was such a hit that it was restaged so it could be videotaped as a lesson for others. The trial, The Smoker vs. The Croaker, was a play written by three eighth- grade students at the Mary B. Volz Junior High School in Runnemede. It was first presented last November in conjunction with The Great American Smokeout to an audience of junior high students.
NEWS
July 12, 1996 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Millions of Americans have used a simple but effective method to quit smoking. Here's how they did it. They said: "I quit. " And they did. They didn't chew nicotine-laced gum. They didn't put nicotine patches on their arms. They didn't join support groups, go to a clinic, consult a shrink, or undergo hypnosis or acupuncture. They just decided putting smoke in their lungs was bad for their health, and stopped doing it. Was it easy? No. Each experienced some discomfort.
SPORTS
April 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - It was, in many ways, the perfect homage to someone who had been celebrated for his singular style, for his cool, for a Philadelphia lifetime known as Harry the K. Shane Victorino, Ryan Howard, Scott Eyre and several other Phillies players couldn't possibly find a truckload of pastel sportcoats to highjack on such short notice so they did the next best thing, sharing a cigarette in the dugout before yesterday's game at Nationals Park....
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer and Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A carelessly discarded cigarette apparently caused the fire that claimed the life Tuesday night of former borough Mayor Carl Lutz. Lutz, 81, who was mayor in the late 1970s and who once co-owned the Logan Inn, was found dead in bed in his heavily damaged hilltop house. Bucks County Fire Marshal William York said the fire was ignited by a cigarette that had been left burning in the TV room next to Lutz's second-floor bedroom. Lutz was known to be a heavy smoker, authorities said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Dan McQuade, For The Inquirer
A lot of the merchandise on the Wildwood boardwalk has a bit of an edge to it. Cheesy T-shirts advertise sex, drugs, even rock and roll (if that's still considered edgy). Stores offer tattoos, temporary or permanent. Other shops sell pipes and bongs "for tobacco use only. " Over the last year or two, however, the boardwalk has added another type of product among the oceanfront shops. The signs advertise vaping, and the stores sell electronic cigarettes. E-cigarettes come in various forms but all work on the same general principle: Liquid nicotine at one end is heated into vapor that is is inhaled through a mouthpiece.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months into its passage, the city's new cigarette tax is on track to generate $5 million more this year than expected for Philadelphia's public schools, while also causing subtle and significant shifts across the region. Some city merchants hate the $2-a-pack hike, saying it is costing them customers. Public health experts are cheering it, saying it might lead some of the city's 275,000 smokers to quit - or encourage others to never start. At least one guy said the tax was a blessing - because he sells loose cigarettes on a busy Center City street.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH & REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writers leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE SHELVES of Ray Martinez's West Philadelphia corner store are stocked full of unopened cigarette packs. Martinez said he's had trouble selling them since the city's $2 cigarette tax to help public schools went into effect Oct. 1. Sales are down about 80 percent, he said, essentially killing the business. "Right now we're not making no money at the corner stores," said Martinez, who owns Ray's Food Market on Girard Avenue near 54th Street. "The stores right here in West Philly, we're like three to five minutes away from City Line [Avenue]
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smokers who figured they could escape Philadelphia's recently enacted $2-per-pack cigarette tax by switching to e-cigarettes could be in for a letdown. City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown said Thursday that she would introduce legislation that would put a $2 tax on e-cigarettes and a tax on the liquid nicotine they use - with the levy going directly to the underfunded Philadelphia school district. "When we know our school district is starving for revenue," Brown said Wednesday, "every penny counts.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE ROLLER COASTER week for Philadelphia public schools continued yesterday with some good and bad news. Gov. Corbett signed a bill authorizing a Philadelphia cigarette tax to provide key funds for the distressed district, ending months of uncertainty and suspense. The tax will be implemented Oct. 1 and is expected to generate approximately $49 million this school year. Less than an hour later, the district announced that scores declined on the 2014 Pennsylvania System of School Assessment for the third straight year.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
BLOOMING GROVE, Pa. - He's dressed in black, or a dark hood, and has been spotted several times from a distance. His trackers think that might be intentional, showing his face in a ploy to taunt them or play games. And he has left behind clues: Serbian cigarettes and soiled diapers, the kind snipers wear when preparing to settle in a spot for a long time. As they revealed new details Wednesday about accused trooper-killer Eric Frein, state police would not say that he was in their grasp.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett on Wednesday signed the bill that authorizes Philadelphia to impose a $2-a-pack tax on cigarettes to help raise money for the city's cash-starved schools. "For the first time while in Harrisburg, I'm smiling," School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said. The signing follows months of wrangling in the GOP-controlled legislature, with some of its more conservative members resisting allowing the city to increase the levy. Corbett, a Republican, said legislators in both parties came together to bridge those differences.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
PHILADELPHIA School District officials breathed a sigh of relief yesterday as a local cigarette tax - $2 per pack to provide key funding for schools - cleared the final hurdle in Harrisburg after months of suspense. The state Senate approved the bill, 39-11, one day after lawmakers in the House passed it. It heads to Gov. Corbett, who is expected to sign it publicly today. The tax is expected to generate at least $49 million this school year for the embattled district, erasing a sizable deficit and averting massive layoffs.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - The state Senate late Tuesday approved a bill authorizing the City of Philadelphia to impose a $2-a-pack tax on cigarettes, ending months of wrangling over revenue to plug a deepening hole in the School District budget. Gov. Corbett said he would sign the bill Wednesday. The price hike could take affect in a week or so. "I am pleased that both chambers have taken action on this legislation so that the Philadelphia School District and, more importantly, the students of Philadelphia can benefit from it," he said in a statement.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
After a months-long delay, the Pennsylvania House approved a bill Monday authorizing Philadelphia to impose a tax of $2 per pack on cigarettes to fund schools. The bill - which passed without debate largely along party lines, 114-84 - next goes to the Senate, which could take a final vote as early as Wednesday. Philadelphia lawmakers applauded the bill's passage as a way to generate funds to address an $80 million school budget shortfall. School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. had said that without it he would be forced to close schools and lay off teachers and staff.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|