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NEWS
June 22, 2011 | Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Rotting teeth and gums. Diseased lungs. A sewn-up corpse of a smoker. Cigarette smoke spewing from the tracheotomy hole in a man's neck. Cigarette packs in the U.S. will have to carry these macabre images in nine warning labels that are part of a campaign by the Food and Drug Administration to use fear and disgust to discourage Americans from lighting up. The labels, announced yesterday, represent the biggest change in cigarette packs in the U.S. in 25 years. At a time when the drop in the nation's smoking rate has come to a standstill, the government is hoping that the in-your-face labels will go further than the current surgeon-general warnings toward curbing tobacco use, which is responsible for about 443,000 deaths a year in the U.S. "These labels are frank, honest and powerful depictions of the health risks of smoking," U.S. Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a statement.
NEWS
June 4, 2004 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Bucks County prison worker was acquitted yesterday of smuggling heroin into the prison last year. James Gilliard, 35, of Roslyn, Montgomery County, admitted taking packs of cigarettes from an inmate's girlfriend and passing them to the inmate. But Gilliard, a former kitchen worker, denied knowing that the sealed packs contained any drugs. After a two-day trial in Bucks County Court, a jury found Gilliard not guilty of possessing and delivering a controlled substance and bringing contraband into the prison.
NEWS
June 25, 2011
With new graphic cigarette warnings unveiled Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers chilling images of the deadly nature of tobacco use - and that's appropriate. The warnings required to be phased in on cigarette packages over the next year or so will include images of blackened lungs and a neck with a tracheotomy hole. Not all of the images are so grim: One shows a man wearing a shirt that reads "I Quit. " By October 2012, cigarette makers will have to stamp these images on the top half of all cigarette packs, in addition to at least devoting 20 percent of cigarette advertising space to the warnings.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The success of a tough antismoking advertising campaign shows why Big Tobacco fights so hard against such efforts.   When presented with the facts, smokers really do want to quit. And the facts are exactly what a graphic $54 million advertising campaign run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides. The "Tips From Former Smokers" campaign includes photos and videos of people suffering from the aftereffects of smoking. In one video, a man in a shower explains: "When you have a hole in your neck, don't face the showerhead.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2011
"I think flying is kind of an emotional experience. Maybe going to buy a couch in a furniture store is much less emotional, you know, because the couch just sits there and doesn't say anything to you. It's not worried about being on time and it doesn't take a huge assemblage of people and technology to bring it to pass. " - Herb Kelleher, former chief executive officer of Southwest Airlines Co. "You might not know this, but one of my responsibilities as commander in chief is to keep an eye on robots.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Rotting teeth and gums. Diseased lungs. A sewn-up corpse of a smoker. Cigarette smoke coming out of the tracheotomy hole in a man's neck. Cigarette packs in the United States will have to carry these macabre images on nine new warning labels that are part of a campaign by the Food and Drug Administration to use fear and disgust to discourage Americans from lighting up. The labels, announced Tuesday, represent the biggest change in cigarette packs in the nation in 25 years.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The images are stark, visceral, even disgusting. And that's really the point. Nearly a half-century after U.S. cigarette packs were emblazoned with their first, modest warning, "Caution: Cigarette Smoking May be Hazardous to Your Health," the Food and Drug Administration - at Congress' behest - is going graphic. It is requiring tobacco companies to print painful images, such as that of a man smoking through a hole in his throat or of a lip eroded by cancer and a mouthful of rotting teeth, right on their cigarette packs.
NEWS
September 10, 1986 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attorneys for a New Jersey man whose wife died of lung cancer have asked the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a precedent-setting decision that severely limited their client's ability to sue three tobacco companies. In the ruling in April, a three-judge panel held in part that Antonio Cipollone of Little Ferry Borough, Bergen County, whose wife died in 1984, could not sue the tobacco companies based on the contention that the warning labels contained on cigarette packs failed to adequately warn of the dangers of smoking.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | By Cal Thomas
Tobacco has replaced communism as the evil empire of the '90s. Twenty-two attorneys general held a news conference to publicly flog the tobacco companies for "lying" and "covering up" their knowledge that tobacco is addictive and can kill people who use it. The smell of moral triumphalism was thicker than a smoke-filled room. The admission by the Liggett Group Inc. that smoking causes cancer and other diseases, its agreement to provide internal documents that could damage the larger tobacco companies and a cash settlement to reimburse states for Medicare expenses associated with smoking-related illnesses is being hailed as a victory for health.
NEWS
August 7, 1995
In the stifling heat last week, South Street wasn't as crowded as usual. Even after the sun went down, the sidewalks weren't jammed. Still, Philly's magnet for young people had its usual style. Lots of kids wore black jeans or skirts, black T-shirts, black boots - offset by unisex earrings. The nose rings and lip ornaments seemed to be for girls only. And dangling from a lot of lips were those mass-marketed symbols of rugged individualism: cigarettes. Asked about that, most said smoking was relaxing - and addictive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The success of a tough antismoking advertising campaign shows why Big Tobacco fights so hard against such efforts.   When presented with the facts, smokers really do want to quit. And the facts are exactly what a graphic $54 million advertising campaign run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides. The "Tips From Former Smokers" campaign includes photos and videos of people suffering from the aftereffects of smoking. In one video, a man in a shower explains: "When you have a hole in your neck, don't face the showerhead.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2011
"I think flying is kind of an emotional experience. Maybe going to buy a couch in a furniture store is much less emotional, you know, because the couch just sits there and doesn't say anything to you. It's not worried about being on time and it doesn't take a huge assemblage of people and technology to bring it to pass. " - Herb Kelleher, former chief executive officer of Southwest Airlines Co. "You might not know this, but one of my responsibilities as commander in chief is to keep an eye on robots.
NEWS
June 25, 2011
With new graphic cigarette warnings unveiled Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers chilling images of the deadly nature of tobacco use - and that's appropriate. The warnings required to be phased in on cigarette packages over the next year or so will include images of blackened lungs and a neck with a tracheotomy hole. Not all of the images are so grim: One shows a man wearing a shirt that reads "I Quit. " By October 2012, cigarette makers will have to stamp these images on the top half of all cigarette packs, in addition to at least devoting 20 percent of cigarette advertising space to the warnings.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Rotting teeth and gums. Diseased lungs. A sewn-up corpse of a smoker. Cigarette smoke coming out of the tracheotomy hole in a man's neck. Cigarette packs in the United States will have to carry these macabre images on nine new warning labels that are part of a campaign by the Food and Drug Administration to use fear and disgust to discourage Americans from lighting up. The labels, announced Tuesday, represent the biggest change in cigarette packs in the nation in 25 years.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The images are stark, visceral, even disgusting. And that's really the point. Nearly a half-century after U.S. cigarette packs were emblazoned with their first, modest warning, "Caution: Cigarette Smoking May be Hazardous to Your Health," the Food and Drug Administration - at Congress' behest - is going graphic. It is requiring tobacco companies to print painful images, such as that of a man smoking through a hole in his throat or of a lip eroded by cancer and a mouthful of rotting teeth, right on their cigarette packs.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Rotting teeth and gums. Diseased lungs. A sewn-up corpse of a smoker. Cigarette smoke spewing from the tracheotomy hole in a man's neck. Cigarette packs in the U.S. will have to carry these macabre images in nine warning labels that are part of a campaign by the Food and Drug Administration to use fear and disgust to discourage Americans from lighting up. The labels, announced yesterday, represent the biggest change in cigarette packs in the U.S. in 25 years. At a time when the drop in the nation's smoking rate has come to a standstill, the government is hoping that the in-your-face labels will go further than the current surgeon-general warnings toward curbing tobacco use, which is responsible for about 443,000 deaths a year in the U.S. "These labels are frank, honest and powerful depictions of the health risks of smoking," U.S. Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a statement.
NEWS
September 6, 2007 | Dan Romer, Paul Slovic and Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Dan Romer is director of the Adolescent Risk Communication Institute of the Annenberg Public Policy Center Paul Slovic heads Decision Research and is a member of the Department of Psychology at the University of Oregon Kathleen Hall Jamieson is director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center Ask any advertiser which is more effective - words or images - and the answer is almost always the same: Visuals pack a greater punch. Think low-cost car insurance. What first comes to mind?
NEWS
June 4, 2004 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Bucks County prison worker was acquitted yesterday of smuggling heroin into the prison last year. James Gilliard, 35, of Roslyn, Montgomery County, admitted taking packs of cigarettes from an inmate's girlfriend and passing them to the inmate. But Gilliard, a former kitchen worker, denied knowing that the sealed packs contained any drugs. After a two-day trial in Bucks County Court, a jury found Gilliard not guilty of possessing and delivering a controlled substance and bringing contraband into the prison.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | By Cal Thomas
Tobacco has replaced communism as the evil empire of the '90s. Twenty-two attorneys general held a news conference to publicly flog the tobacco companies for "lying" and "covering up" their knowledge that tobacco is addictive and can kill people who use it. The smell of moral triumphalism was thicker than a smoke-filled room. The admission by the Liggett Group Inc. that smoking causes cancer and other diseases, its agreement to provide internal documents that could damage the larger tobacco companies and a cash settlement to reimburse states for Medicare expenses associated with smoking-related illnesses is being hailed as a victory for health.
NEWS
August 7, 1995
In the stifling heat last week, South Street wasn't as crowded as usual. Even after the sun went down, the sidewalks weren't jammed. Still, Philly's magnet for young people had its usual style. Lots of kids wore black jeans or skirts, black T-shirts, black boots - offset by unisex earrings. The nose rings and lip ornaments seemed to be for girls only. And dangling from a lot of lips were those mass-marketed symbols of rugged individualism: cigarettes. Asked about that, most said smoking was relaxing - and addictive.
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