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NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Board members of the Crisis Intervention Network are investigating the executive director's use of agency money for personal expenses, ranging from no-interest loans and automobile insurance to his dues at the YMCA. In recent interviews with the Daily News, CIN executive director Bennie J. Swans Jr. acknowledged some of the agency's payments on his behalf, including personal loans in excess of $1,000 and $3,811 for insurance on his Lincoln Town Car. Swans said the expenditures were comparable to fringe benefits provided to other top-level Philadelphia-area executives.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The city is talking with two private, non-profit agencies about filling the void left by the demise of the Crisis Intervention Network, and is planning to shift the program's emphasis from gang control to fighting drugs. Bennie J. Swans Jr., CIN's director from 1975 until it folded last week, has submitted his own proposal for $870,000 in city funding, to set up a new non-profit agency to continue CIN's work. But one official says Swans will not get any more money from the city, at least in the current budget year.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
City Controller John G. Smithyman has agreed to release another $42,000 in city tax dollars to the Crisis Intervention Network, allowing the non-profit gang-control agency to meet another payroll - one week late. The Goode administration had approved an $80,000 payment, but Smithyman said he reduced the figure because of questionable CIN expenditures dating back to 1987. "With all the questioned costs, I could have paid them just $16,000," Smithyman said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | By Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
Bennie Swans says a final bankruptcy court report on his defunct Crisis Intervention Network "truly vindicates me," but he adds that the city's African-American youth have suffered since the agency's demise. "I think there's no question for the need for a similar organization to be re-instituted," said Swans, the former CIN director, who noted an increase in drug-related violence in the city since the collapse of CIN in December 1988. A report filed Monday by Mitchell W. Miller, who was appointed trustee of CIN after it filed for bankruptcy, noted that no criminal charges were pending against Swans following investigations by the FBI, district attorney's office and city inspector general's office.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Before the city cut off funds to the non-profit Crisis Intervention Network two weeks ago, an investigating panel of three board members had accused CIN executive director Bennie J. Swans Jr. of serious mismanagement and recommended his immediate dismissal. The panel, headed by Common Pleas Judge Theodore A. McKee, charged that Swans had misled CIN's board about the agency's troubled finances. In spite of overdue tax bills and many other budget problems, the panel said, Swans repeatedly used CIN money for personal expenses like car insurance and YMCA dues, over protests from CIN's controller.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The Crisis Intervention Network - a non-profit Philadelphia agency with a reputation as one of the most effective gang-control programs in the nation - is officially dead. Faced with more than $200,000 in debts to the Internal Revenue Service and a decision by Mayor Goode to cut off a $1.5 million city contract, CIN's board of directors voted last night to declare bankruptcy and disband. The decision followed months of controversy over charges of spending abuse and mismanagement, leveled at CIN's executive director, Bennie J. Swans Jr., by current and former employees.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Agreeing to an ultimatum from the Goode administration, the board of the Crisis Intervention Network has approved a plan to turn its financial reins over to the Philadelphia Urban Coalition. The board of CIN, a non-profit gang-control and community-service organization, met for about two hours last night and decided to work with the Urban Coalition, according to CIN co-chairman David Kairys. City Managing Director James S. White had proposed the partnership last week, threatening to terminate a $1.5 million city contract with CIN unless it agreed to outside supervision of its finances.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Goode has cut off city funds for the non-profit Crisis Intervention Network, forcing the gang-control agency to immediately lay off most of its staff and shut down its programs. Layoff notices were distributed yesterday to 38 of CIN's 48 employees. Executive director Bennie J. Swans Jr. said that he and a "skeleton crew" of nine other employees would stay on the payroll through Jan. 5 to wrap up loose ends and search for another funding source to keep the agency going. Goode told reporters that he hoped CIN's staff and programs could continue under the management of another social service agency.
NEWS
November 23, 1988
Nobody is indispensable, not even Bennie Swans. He, however, would be among the very few who would be badly missed. It seems necessary to make that point before trying to assess the controversy that surrounds Mr. Swans' management of the city-supported Crisis Intervention Network (CIN). Even though the city has not yet completed its investigation, the Goode administration has indicated that the city might cut off funding to the crisis agency if its nationally famous director is fired.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration is close to reaching an agreement with the Philadelphia Urban Coalition on a new community-relations program to provide new jobs to former employees of the bankrupt Crisis Intervention Network, including its former executive director, Bennie J. Swans Jr. The coalition's executive director, Ernest Jones, confirmed yesterday that he was developing a proposal to present to his board of directors and, with its approval, to...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Dining with David Sanborn, of Power 99's popular Carter and Sanborn team, is a lot like watching a "Kung Fu" rerun on TV. He's full of East-meets-West wisdom. Like, for instance, the reason Chinese restaurants serve hot tea first is to aid digestion, he says. "We tend to drink a cold drink before we eat and have a cold salad," Sanborn explained, as he sipped some during a recent dinner at Cin Cin in Chestnut Hill, his favorite restaurant. "The cold is kind of a shock . . . while the warm allows the stomach to expand.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | By Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
Bennie Swans says a final bankruptcy court report on his defunct Crisis Intervention Network "truly vindicates me," but he adds that the city's African-American youth have suffered since the agency's demise. "I think there's no question for the need for a similar organization to be re-instituted," said Swans, the former CIN director, who noted an increase in drug-related violence in the city since the collapse of CIN in December 1988. A report filed Monday by Mitchell W. Miller, who was appointed trustee of CIN after it filed for bankruptcy, noted that no criminal charges were pending against Swans following investigations by the FBI, district attorney's office and city inspector general's office.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even though city officials last year alleged hundreds of thousands of dollars of "questionable costs" by the Crisis Intervention Network, final bankruptcy files of the defunct gang-control agency show that, in the end, the city owed CIN money. The same files show that CIN and its director, Bennie J. Swans Jr., were investigated by the FBI, a county grand jury and the District Attorney's Office without any charges being filed. "Thank God, it's over," Swans said yesterday.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration is close to reaching an agreement with the Philadelphia Urban Coalition on a new community-relations program to provide new jobs to former employees of the bankrupt Crisis Intervention Network, including its former executive director, Bennie J. Swans Jr. The coalition's executive director, Ernest Jones, confirmed yesterday that he was developing a proposal to present to his board of directors and, with its approval, to...
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The Crisis Intervention Network - a non-profit Philadelphia agency with a reputation as one of the most effective gang-control programs in the nation - is officially dead. Faced with more than $200,000 in debts to the Internal Revenue Service and a decision by Mayor Goode to cut off a $1.5 million city contract, CIN's board of directors voted last night to declare bankruptcy and disband. The decision followed months of controversy over charges of spending abuse and mismanagement, leveled at CIN's executive director, Bennie J. Swans Jr., by current and former employees.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Before the city cut off funds to the non-profit Crisis Intervention Network two weeks ago, an investigating panel of three board members had accused CIN executive director Bennie J. Swans Jr. of serious mismanagement and recommended his immediate dismissal. The panel, headed by Common Pleas Judge Theodore A. McKee, charged that Swans had misled CIN's board about the agency's troubled finances. In spite of overdue tax bills and many other budget problems, the panel said, Swans repeatedly used CIN money for personal expenses like car insurance and YMCA dues, over protests from CIN's controller.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
The city is talking with two private, non-profit agencies about filling the void left by the demise of the Crisis Intervention Network, and is planning to shift the program's emphasis from gang control to fighting drugs. Bennie J. Swans Jr., CIN's director from 1975 until it folded last week, has submitted his own proposal for $870,000 in city funding, to set up a new non-profit agency to continue CIN's work. But one official says Swans will not get any more money from the city, at least in the current budget year.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Libby Harwitz was there at the beginning, on the periphery, as Sarah Gibson and Bennie Swans and Larry Rawles and Randall Sims and others began the Crisis Intervention Network. She is a board member now, a member of the board of a gang-control agency that had its funding ended by Mayor Goode on Friday. And she was a member of the board committee that investigated Swans' performance and came up with a report critical of him, a report that has not been made public. CIN may be dead; her memories are alive.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Goode has cut off city funds for the non-profit Crisis Intervention Network, forcing the gang-control agency to immediately lay off most of its staff and shut down its programs. Layoff notices were distributed yesterday to 38 of CIN's 48 employees. Executive director Bennie J. Swans Jr. said that he and a "skeleton crew" of nine other employees would stay on the payroll through Jan. 5 to wrap up loose ends and search for another funding source to keep the agency going. Goode told reporters that he hoped CIN's staff and programs could continue under the management of another social service agency.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
City Controller John G. Smithyman has agreed to release another $42,000 in city tax dollars to the Crisis Intervention Network, allowing the non-profit gang-control agency to meet another payroll - one week late. The Goode administration had approved an $80,000 payment, but Smithyman said he reduced the figure because of questionable CIN expenditures dating back to 1987. "With all the questioned costs, I could have paid them just $16,000," Smithyman said in an interview yesterday.
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