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Circuit Breaker

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BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | By Mariann Caprino, Associated Press Inquirer staff writer Barbara Demick contributed to this article
The Securities and Exchange Commission said yesterday it was examining computer-generated program trading during last Friday's 120.31-point plunge in the Dow Jones industrial average. Several market participants said program trading continued in the final hour of plummeting prices - even after the Dow had fallen 50 points, tripping a New York Stock Exchange "circuit breaker" aimed at prohibiting some computerized trading. "Program trading accounted for a lot of the decline in the last hour," said Hugh Johnson, chief market analyst for First Albany Corp.
NEWS
September 23, 2006 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The underground electrical fire that led to the evacuation of 5,000 office workers near City Hall on Thursday apparently could have been avoided if a single circuit breaker had been closed, Peco said yesterday. Michael Wood, a utility spokesman, said Peco was trying to determine if human error or a mechanical malfunction was behind the circuit breaker failure. Since the utility might pursue litigation over the fire and power outage, Wood declined to identify the building where the problem originated.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1988 | By Idris Michael Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Justice Department says it will drop its challenge to Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s acquisition of Challenger Electric Equipment Corp. if part of the Malvern firm is sold. In legal documents filed last week, the Justice Department says it will not oppose the acquisition if Challenger sells its circuit-breaker plant in Albemarle, N.C. The Justice Department approved the purchase by Westinghouse of all other Challenger operations, including three circuit-breaker plants in Puerto Rico, at a price of $195 million.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A Detroit television station reported yesterday that the crew of Northwest Flight 255 had disconnected an alarm meant to indicate problems with the airplane's systems, but transportation officials discounted the report. The plane's cockpit voice recorder has shown no evidence that the alarm sounded before Flight 255 took off Aug. 16 from Detroit Metropolitan Airport. The plane crashed just after takeoff, killing 154 people on board and two on the ground. It was the second-worst airplane disaster in the nation's history.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sun came up and the power went down around most of downtown Trenton yesterday. The failure of one circuit breaker at Public Service Electric & Gas Co.'s Chauncey Street substation caused a blackout for about 45 minutes at the beginning of the business day. The power failure left 10,953 PSE&G customers without power from 8:12 to 9 a.m., said Neil Brown, a company spokesman. Government buildings, businesses and residences were affected by the outage. No major problems were reported as a result of the failure, said Charles Betz, the director of Trenton's Office of Emergency Management.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2001 | Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Start the "new" Greek Picnic weekend tonight by setting off aboard the Spirit of Philadelphia with the Ques and Ricky D. If you still have dance left in you after the Area: One Festival at the Tweeter Center on Saturday, cross the bridge to Shampoo for an after-party with Slynke, Julia Factorial, Imri, Zonel Smart, Circuit Breaker, Robbie Tronco, Jason Leroy and Carl Michaels. And, if you can get out of bed, don't miss Alex Adrock's "Everybody Loves the Sunshine" at Chrome on Sunday afternoons.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 53-page document reads more like a screenplay than a lawsuit. If Jerald Batoff's claim is true, that's how it may end up. More than seven months after his historic Main Line home, a 24,000-square-foot estate designed by Horace Trumbauer, burned to the ground, Batoff says the blaze was part of a multimillion-dollar arson and fraud scheme by a Canadian businessman and his girlfriend who only pretended to want to buy the place. According to the complaint, filed late last week, the plot hatched by Dean Topolinski and Julie Charbonneau went like this: String Batoff along with a $260,000 down payment, monthly lease checks, and other cash siphoned from a company on the verge of collapse.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By Matthew Spolar INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since it opened last year, Elissa Eystad said, strange things have happened at her candy store in Pitman. Boxes of chocolate and tubs of ice cream have vanished in the night. She found a crushed soda can on the ground with a cigarette inside, though none of her four female employees - including her three daughters - smokes. And she was perplexed when she came in to find the toilet seat raised. "I knew something was up. I just didn't know how and who or what," said Eystad, 40. Then, Saturday night, Pitman police came to her door with news of a video posted on a Facebook account.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charlie Bellitto said yesterday that he didn't know what to think when he heard a loud boom and then a crash as he sat on a living room couch with his wife and two children watching a Pinocchio video. "First thing I thought was a plane had crashed," said Bellitto, 39, who lives in the 700 block of East Marshall Street with his wife, Barbara, 36, and children, Christina, 7, and Charlie Jr., 8. "Then I thought the Russians caught up with us or the Iranians finally got us. All I could think was this was the end. " Officials from Peco Energy Co. continued yesterday to investigate why a circuit breaker that connected two transformers blew up. A worker from a local glass company replaced the Bellittos' kitchen window, which was broken by the explosion.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This time it wasn't an overloaded circuit breaker or a fire-ravaged substation responsible for yet another power outage that affected 2,300 customers of Peco Energy Co. yesterday. It was simply Mother Nature. "She got us this time," said Lisa Moorhead, Peco spokeswoman. "There were no loading problems. It was the wind. " With the advent of a cold front, high winds blew into the area and swept a fence into Peco's mobile transformer on Holland Avenue, Moorhead said. The fence struck a service line that leads to the transformer, causing a couple of thousand customers to lose power.
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NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 53-page document reads more like a screenplay than a lawsuit. If Jerald Batoff's claim is true, that's how it may end up. More than seven months after his historic Main Line home, a 24,000-square-foot estate designed by Horace Trumbauer, burned to the ground, Batoff says the blaze was part of a multimillion-dollar arson and fraud scheme by a Canadian businessman and his girlfriend who only pretended to want to buy the place. According to the complaint, filed late last week, the plot hatched by Dean Topolinski and Julie Charbonneau went like this: String Batoff along with a $260,000 down payment, monthly lease checks, and other cash siphoned from a company on the verge of collapse.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donna Hughes and her boyfriend, Jim Maguire, had grown used to the electrical problems in their building. They'd been renting the two-bedroom apartment on the second floor of a brick rowhouse in the working class borough of Morrisville, Bucks County, for the last five years. It was well-maintained by the landlord, Hughes said. "But these are really old houses. The circuit breaker would trip, the lights would go out and we'd reset it. " At about 10 p.m. Saturday, Maguire went to the bathroom, flipped the light switch and heard a zap. "The light's out again," Hughes heard Maguire say, then, "I think our roof is on fire.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011
In the Region Amerisource buys drug-services firm AmerisourceBergen Corp. said it agreed to buy TheraCom L.L.C., which supplies consulting and reimbursement services for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, for $250 million. TheraCom is a unit of the drugstore operator and pharmacy benefits provider CVS Caremark Corp. The deal is expected to be completed by the end of the year. AmerisourceBergen, Valley Forge, is a distributor of pharmaceuticals. - Paul Schweizer The Bancorp to buy back stock The Bancorp Inc., Wilmington, said its board of directors authorized the repurchase of up to 750,000 shares of the company's common stock, or about 2.5 percent of the total outstanding.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | Staff Report
Service has been restored to all of the 20,000 customers affected by this morning's power outage in the Mayfair and Holmesburg sections of the city, PECO says. Most customers were without electric service for about three hours because of a circuit breaker that caught fire at an electrical substation on Rhawn Street, near Torresdale Avenue. And additional 5,000 finally had service restored by 11:30 a.m., according to PECO spokesman Ben Armstrong. Armstrong said PECO and fire officials responded to the small fire about 4:45 a.m. They were able to extinguish it by 7:30 a.m., but it took some time for crews to examine the extent of the damage.
SPORTS
January 9, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The New Jersey Devils' game with the Tampa Bay Lightning in Newark, N.J. was suspended last night when a lighting problem on one side of the arena in the second period could not be fixed. The teams waited 1 hour, 52 minutes before suspending the game, with the Lightning leading, 3-0, with 9:12 left in the period. "We felt the teams could not continue playing," said Colin Campbell, the NHL's senior executive vice president of hockey operations. "We were left with no alternative but to postpone further play for the evening.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By Matthew Spolar INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since it opened last year, Elissa Eystad said, strange things have happened at her candy store in Pitman. Boxes of chocolate and tubs of ice cream have vanished in the night. She found a crushed soda can on the ground with a cigarette inside, though none of her four female employees - including her three daughters - smokes. And she was perplexed when she came in to find the toilet seat raised. "I knew something was up. I just didn't know how and who or what," said Eystad, 40. Then, Saturday night, Pitman police came to her door with news of a video posted on a Facebook account.
LIVING
November 23, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: The electrical wiring inside my house seems to be a mishmash of different kinds. Some of it looks in real bad shape. How do I know which wiring needs to go, and which is OK? Answer: That's the job of an electrician. If you have an older house, it will have several generations of wiring. Some of it may be in great shape; some may be in need of replacement or at least a careful look by a professional. And I mean a licensed professional, because a lot of electrical wiring in houses is done by amateurs - the previous owners or their friends.
NEWS
December 29, 2006 | By Carl Golden
I am terrified of Home Depot. And Lowe's. And places like them. Oh, sure, I watch all the TV commercials that show helpful store personnel in orange aprons skillfully demonstrating the latest in power tools to smiling customers. Everybody looks delighted. Me? I break out in a cold sweat every time I walk into one of these places and take in miles of aisles offering merchandise to build, remodel, renovate or demolish just about anything ever constructed. I have this recurring nightmare in which I'm stranded in the middle of the store, unable to find an exit.
NEWS
September 23, 2006 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The underground electrical fire that led to the evacuation of 5,000 office workers near City Hall on Thursday apparently could have been avoided if a single circuit breaker had been closed, Peco said yesterday. Michael Wood, a utility spokesman, said Peco was trying to determine if human error or a mechanical malfunction was behind the circuit breaker failure. Since the utility might pursue litigation over the fire and power outage, Wood declined to identify the building where the problem originated.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether the doomed world of the Terminator will come true is yet to be seen; however, at Tribecca tonight it will be "Rise of the Machine" as Anton Chasm - who will be celebrating the release of Happiness - Dozia, Deep C and Circuit Breaker machinate the metal while Mz. Buttakup engineers her own circuits for lyrics. The fellas at Tuning Spork are at it again. The label has enlisted Geoff White for Saturday at Silk City, where Sean O'Neal will also step to the tables. Up the street that night at Transit will be Satoshi Tomiie.
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