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BUSINESS
September 8, 1995 | GEORGE MILLER/ DAILY NEWS
The $400,000 aluminum and glass modern sculpture that soars across the ceiling of the Convention Center's Grand Hall has been given a new name. First called "Virgo," its creator, New York artist Judy Pfaff, has now decided on a new moniker, "cirque CIRQUE. " That's circus, circus in French and it is something of a high-wire act. The $2 million art collection for the center has now been completed and the Convention Center Authority will honor the artists at a luncheon today.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / BOB WILLIAMS
The Backyard Circus found plenty of eager recruits in Caln Township earlier this month. The circus set up a tent at Brandywine Hospital's Strawberry Festival, and children from the audience dressed up as lions, acrobats and ballerinas. The circus was part of Midway Caravan carnival of Freeville, N.Y.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / PAOLA TAGLIAMONTE
All aboard, for the final feat of the Moroccan Connection during a performance Saturday of the Bentley Bros. Circus. The circus' 19th annual show at the Devon Horse Show grounds benefited the Lower Merion Fraternal Order of Police.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | For The Inquirer / ELEFTHERIOS KOSTANS
The Clyde Beatty Cole Bros. Circus brought its elephants, tigers, clowns and other performers to the Exton Square Mall over the weekend. Two shows each were performed Saturday and Sunday in a parking lot outside the mall.
NEWS
April 18, 2002
FOR WELL over two centuries, members of the animal kingdom have played an integral role in the circus experience, in partnership with human performers who have loved and devoted their lives to their care. It is true that there exists the potential for abuse in this and most other forms of guardian or parental relationships, but wisely, society does not seek to ban or outlaw all nurturing of its children. However, there are misguided individuals and organizations trying to do just that in regard to the universally beloved institution we call the circus.
NEWS
August 23, 1986
I am looking at the front page of the Aug. 12 Inquirer. A large picture shows two policemen prying open the trunk of a car that was abandoned for three days and from which, reportedly, a putrid odor was emanating. Hundreds of spectators are being restrained by police barricades. The obvious question: Why not tow the car to the privacy of a police garage and then open the trunk rather than make a circus out of something which, in a civilized society, should be the very antithesis of entertainment?
NEWS
August 29, 2003
RE R.F. Houston's letter (Aug. 12) suggesting "wild animals live considerably longer in humane and protective environments," in defense of circus entertainment: Sure, but at what cost? We in prison have the same advantages as the caged animals. We too are kept in humane and protective conditions. Free room and board, food, utilities, and yes, free health care. Again, at what cost? You can't put a price on freedom. Granted, we screwed up and deserve to be here. However, given a second chance at life, we'd much prefer to pay our own way, and be out free.
NEWS
August 1, 2003
IT IS regrettable that the prestigious Liacouras Center at Temple will be the site of a panorama of pain euphemistically termed a "circus. " Sterling & Reid Bros. will be bringing a collection of captive animal pawns forced to perform unnatural and frightening acts as a result of the generous use of whips, bullhooks, electric prods and deprivation of food and water. Circuses are nothing more than an exercise in cruelty and exploitation masquerading as family entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How would you like to be shot out of a cannon? Well, it's a living. Actually, John Weiss loves it. In the 19 years he's been with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, he has been a human projectile about 4,000 times. He is getting his highs now at the First Union Spectrum, where what is billed as the 130th edition of "The Greatest Show on Earth" opened last night for a 10-day run. In his act, Weiss wears a multicolored clown costume but nothing special for padding, just back and knee supports.
NEWS
September 21, 2015
Three-ring circus After reading each day of the latest plans for the pope's visit and then "Towing to begin a week before visit" (Sept. 11), I have a clear image of a three-ring circus, with three simultaneous, unrelated tricks performed without a program. The viewer just watches as tricks unfold. What happened to good planning and execution? We would never survive in business with this poor rendition of planning. How can we show ourselves as world-leader-worthy when we have no one capable of putting together a truly integrated, positive event for all involved?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016
ISSUE | ANIMAL CRUELTY Good move to ban circus elephants Kudos to N.J. Sen. Raymond J. Lesniak (D., Union) for sponsoring "Nosey's Law," named for a 34-year-old circus elephant ("Senate panel OKs ban on elephant acts," Wednesday). By banning circus elephants, this bill will protect animals and humans alike. Circus elephants are deprived of everything that is natural and important. While wild elephants can roam up to 30 miles daily, circus elephants spend endless hours - and even days - shackled.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
New Jersey lawmakers have taken the first step toward possibly making the state the first in the country to ban elephant acts from circus performances. A state Senate committee voted 3-2 Monday to refer a bill imposing the ban to the full Senate. Only two other states - Rhode Island and California - have imposed restrictions on elephant acts, banning the use of bull hooks to move the animals. The New Jersey bill was approved in committee along partisan lines and its prospects of becoming law are uncertain.
SPORTS
June 14, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
WHEN YOU go to the circus you only want to see the bearded lady once. You could watch the daring young man on the flying trapeze over and over again, but nobody keeps going back to the freak show The senior tour has its bearded lady. John Daly last month joined the PGA Tour Champions. Now he travels from town to town in his superbus, playing powerful, indifferent golf and drawing his NASCAR crowd: fans who love his folksy manner but know that, at any moment, he might crash and burn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2016 | A.D. Amorosi, Contributor
As the traditional circus changes with the times, the list of entertainment that brands itself as such has grown beyond Barnum & Bailey (although, we've got that, too). It's a season filled with acrobats, aerialists, and jugglers. Philadelphia looks even more like a three-ring circus than it usually does. Cirque du Soleil's OVO The Franco-Canadian import Cirque du Soleil has changed the energy of the circus art form with subtle touches when it comes to slapstick clowning, hand-to-hand balancing acts, choreographed movement, and athletic, jazzy aerial work.
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
THE ELEPHANTS are gone from the Ringling Bros. circus. I am glad and amazed. The orca shows at Sea World are next to go. Glad and amazed again. These decisions are "game-changing," according to Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, the nation's largest animal advocacy group. The elephants are also gone from the Philadelphia Zoo, glad again, although I know children miss the thrill of their gentle enormity. Zoos elsewhere have or will shed their pachyderms.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
WHEN HE was 12, he ran away to join the circus. He didn't really know why. Sixty years later, Michael Margolis realized he wanted to be a Strongman. Strongman is an archaic term describing a muscular man you would find in almost every circus sideshow. Some lifted enormous weights. Some tore telephone books (remember them?) in half. Some burst through steel chains around their chests. Some bent steel - and that's what Margolis decided he wanted to do, last October. Today, you can see him doing it on his Facebook page.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2016
By Toby ZinmanFOR THE INQUIRER Philadelphia Artists' Collective has gently transformed the dignified and beautiful Broad Street Ministry into a circus tent, with red and white banners and strings of colored lights. The occasion is their production of He Who Gets Slapped , another of their unearthed forgotten plays, although this one might have stayed buried with nobody the sadder. Written by Leonid Andreyev and translated from Russian to English in 1922, this current adaptation is by Walter Wykes and is directed by Damon Bonetti.
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Animal-rights activists standing watch this weekend at the Broad Street entrance to the Wells Fargo Center were unsuccessful at keeping Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus showgoers at bay. The protesters held well-worn signs warning "Animal Abuse Inside," "Caged for Life" and "Wild Animals Belong in the Wild" - most directing the inquisitive to visit circuses.com, which actually links to the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. "Those with tickets are still driving in," admitted Camden-based sign-toter Brian Foglia, sporting a Cumberland Valley SPCA logo on his jacket.
NEWS
February 19, 2016
ISSUE | ANIMAL TREATMENT Captivity endangers circus elephants The death last month of a 2-year-old Asian elephant named Mike at Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus' breeding and training compound in Florida is another stark reminder that elephants do not belong in captivity. Mike probably died from elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus, a pathogen commonly found among captive, young elephants. Research suggests that young elephants are susceptible to the virus because of the stress of captivity.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
The Circus: Inside the Greatest Political Show on Earth. Game Change writers Mark Halperin and John Heilemann cover the 2016 presidential race in this weekly show. 8 p.m. Sunday on Showtime. War and Peace. Leo Tolstoy's great novel done by Lifetime, you say? It's not as bad as it sounds. Paul Dano ( Love and Mercy ) leads a cast that boils down the Russian saga to its most exciting bits (think romance, death) without the bothersome moralizing. 9 p.m. Monday on Lifetime. Baskets . Zach Galifianakis could have kept doing middling movie comedies ( The Campaign , anyone?
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