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Citizens Bank

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BUSINESS
June 20, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the documents filed in recent weeks are any indication, a truce is not likely Monday when one of the region's more prolific developers, J. Brian O'Neill, and Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania face off in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court. Judge Albert W. Sheppard Jr. is scheduled to hear arguments on a motion by Citizens Bank to have O'Neill's stunning lawsuit - filled with allegations of fraud and other abuses by the bank - thrown out. In January, O'Neill sued the bank for $8 billion, alleging broken financial promises by Citizens that he says have "destroyed" his much-anticipated - and largely incomplete - Uptown Worthington mixed-use development in Malvern.
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | By WILSON GOODE JR
ON SEPT. 13, Philadelphia City Council unanimously passed a resolution that I sponsored calling on the Philadelphia Community Reinvestment Commission to establish reinvestment agreements with banks entering the Philadelphia market. The resolution cited that reinvestment commission member Mellon Bank had sold its branches to Citizens Bank. Mellon's appointment to the commission was due to its market share of small business lending in low -income communities. Recently released data from the City Controller's Office shows that loans for small business in low-income communities are decreasing.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania is closing nine branches in the Philadelphia region, consisting of seven in Southeastern Pennsylvania, one in South Jersey, and one in northern Delaware, a spokeswoman said Friday. The bank, which is part of Citizens Financial Group, based in Rhode Island, had 173 branches in the eight-county Philadelphia region at the end of June, the second largest number behind Wells Fargo's 187. Spokeswoman Sylvia Bronner said the closures were part of a regular process of assessing how the bank can best serve its customers economically.
NEWS
November 11, 2002
Westward ho! That could be the latest rallying cry for housing in Philadelphia thanks to Citizens Bank's new program in and around University City. The news couldn't be more welcome. Not only will the effort build upon the University of Pennsylvania's success in redeveloping that area, it could encourage other lenders to invest in neighborhoods with the potential to go from high-risk to highly desirable. Citizens will make available $28.5 million in grants and low-interest loans for small businesses, and for residents and community groups to buy properties and do renovations.
NEWS
June 6, 2008
WHAT a difference going to a Phillies game compared to an Eagles game in the upper level. I've been an Eagles season ticketholder for 35 years and also attend my fair share of Phillies games. The Phils' employees are all helpful and polite. I can't say that about most Eagles employees. The female usher at our section (420) at a recent Phillies game even wiped off our seat before we sat down. They reversed the escalator toward the end of the game so people didn't have to walk the ramps the whole way down - unlike the Eagles, who shut the escalators down and guard them so you're forced to walk down the neverending shaky ramps.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania said yesterday that it would hire more than 300 workers by the end of June for its Philadelphia-area operations. The Scottish-owned bank bought Mellon Bank's branches last year. More than half the added workers will be based at Citizens' new data center above Strawbridge's on Market Street; most of the rest will work as branch tellers. Mayor Street praised the "immediate economic shot in the arm" that the hiring would produce, and said it showed the bank's "long-term commitment to growth" in the city.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
One of the biggest challenges teachers face is keeping their students engaged in the learning process. Start off strong, and the chances for a good school year increase radically. But across the Delaware Valley, some students are at a disadvantage because they lack something pretty basic - school supplies. Yet it all makes sense. A child who begins or returns to school this fall lacking the physical tools needed to succeed - such as new paper, pencils, and a backpack - is more likely to struggle.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania and developer Brian O'Neill of O'Neill Properties Group have announced a settlement of all litigation between them. The terms and conditions of the settlement are confidential. O'Neill, one of the Philadelphia region's most prolific developers of residential and commercial properties, had filed a lawsuit against Citizens, one of his company's primary lenders, in January 2010, claiming that it breached its financial commitments to him. That action was part of a deteriorating relationship between bank and developer, with Citizens Bank having secured a $61 million judgment against O'Neill in November 2009 for default on an office-construction loan for his still-largely incomplete Uptown Worthington mixed-use project in East Whiteland Township, Chester County.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
Standard & Poor's Ratings Services boosted its credit rating of Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania to "A/A-1" from "A-/A-2. " The upgrade also applied to RBS Citizens N.A., which has branches in New England and in the Midwest. Both banks are owned by Citizens Financial Group, of Providence, R.I., which is a subsidiary of the Royal Bank of Scotland Group p.l.c. S&P cited Citizens' improved profitability this year and the stabilization of Citizens' loan book, which includes $24 billion worth of home-equity loans from areas where it has branches.
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SPORTS
December 10, 2015 | By Matt Breen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NASHVILLE - Tyler Goeddel, a former-first-round pick by Tampa Bay, appears to be the player the Phillies will target with the No. 1 pick in Thursday morning's Rule 5 Draft. Goeddel, a 23-year-old outfielder, spent all of last season in double A. Tampa Bay drafted him in 2011. He spent his first three seasons as an infielder before transitioning to the outfield last year. He can play any of the three outfield positions. The righthander batted .279 with a .350 on-base percentage in 473 at-bats.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2015
Marian Baldini has been hired as president and CEO of KenCrest, a nonprofit Plymouth Meeting provider of human and social services for people across the age spectrum who have, or are at risk of having, intellectual disabilities and autism. She had been chief operating officer of Jewish Employment and Vocational Services of Philadelphia. Amy J. Goldberg has been appointed professor and chair of the department of surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University , surgeon-in-chief for Temple University Health System , and medical director of perioperative services at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
October 29, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
CHAKA FATTAH JR., who is battling federal prosecutors and agents in a trial in which he is both the defendant and the defense attorney, is expected to mount his case sometime today. The son of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah Sr. is not a lawyer and didn't graduate from college. He is representing himself against charges that he defrauded banks, the IRS and the Philadelphia School District. "Yes, the defense case will start [today]," Fattah, 32, said yesterday after another long court day. He said he expects to call witnesses to the stand.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN FEDERAL COURT yesterday, a former Drexel dormitory suitemate of Chaka Fattah Jr. described the Henry Avenue apartment Fattah and his onetime freshman roommate moved to as filled with pizza boxes, big-screen television sets and two closets full of high-end clothing that Fattah wore. But he said he saw little work being done there. "They were just collecting pizza boxes," Albert Guerraty told jurors yesterday. He said he only saw Fattah laying on a couch "watching 'Law & Order' every day" and Fattah's roommate, Matthew Amato, spending time at a nearby apartment pool and bar. Yet, he said that Amato was driving a BMW, which Fattah later said cost $48,000, and that Fattah was driving a Range Rover Sport, costing $70,000.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2015 | By Joseph N. Distefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
BB&T Corp., the North Carolina-based banking giant, is buying its way into Pennsylvania, where it says it will compete with market leaders Wells Fargo, PNC Bank, and Citizens Bank. The bank on Tuesday said it had agreed to pay $1.8 billion in cash and stock, or $13 a share, for National Penn Bancshares of Allentown. National Penn has $9.6 billion in assets and 124 branches in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland. The deal, plus BB&T's recent $2.5 billion purchase of Lancaster, Pa.-based Susquehanna Bancshares, will make BB&T the largest or second-largest bank by deposits in Chester, Lancaster, Berks, and Lehigh Counties.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Much has happened to Billy Joel since his sell-out shows last summer at Citizens Bank Park, which was also Thursday night's venue. Once each month, in an amazing display of audience loyalty and personal dedication, Joel has been packing them in at Madison Square Garden. Then on Wednesday, at the age of 66, Billy became the father of a baby girl, Della Rose Joel, after recently having married (in April) his 33-year-old then-girlfriend Alexis. So there was much to celebrate on Thursday night, and Joel hit the CBP in kinetic, fired-up form from the start.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania and other units of Rhode Island-based Citizens Financial Group have agreed to pay more than $30 million in restitution and penalties for not bothering to correct small deposit errors - up to $50 a transaction - for business and consumer customers from 2008 through 2013, federal bank regulators said Wednesday. "We are pleased to have resolved this matter from an earlier era," Citizens said in a statement, admitting that its past practices "could have been better.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1981, a Genuardi's supermarket opened in Chesterbrook, anchoring a shopping plaza that helped define the sprawling Chester County development as a cutting-edge planned community. Three decades later, the shine was off. Three quarters of the plaza was vacant, and the supermarket was an abandoned shell. On Tuesday, the former Genuardi's building is set to fall. Its demolition marks the first swing in an $85 million plan to remake the 34-year-old plaza. When it ends, Chesterbrook Village Shopping Center is expected to sprout 123 new townhouses around a 30,000-square-foot retail strip.
SPORTS
July 22, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
This is going to be something to see and that is seldom said around here anymore. For a five-year span, Citizens Bank Park trumped the Jersey Shore, the Poconos and every other site in our area as the place to be in the searing heat of summer. From the parking lot tailgates to the congested strolls out on Ashburn Alley, the ballpark was a happening as much as it was a place for a great baseball game. That is all gone now. Only the diehards and those with free or deeply discounted tickets plop into the blue seats to watch a team that has trouble hitting, pitching and fielding most nights.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herb Hortman, 57, of Doylestown, an airplane pilot and president of Hortman Aviation Services Inc. in Northeast Philadelphia, died Sunday, May 17, of a heart ailment at Doylestown Hospital. Mr. Hortman succeeded his father, Norman, in running one of the oldest flight schools in the region. The school has been in continuous existence for 35 years; it has been based at Northeast Philadelphia Airport since the 1980s. Dozens of Mr. Hortman's students have gone on to professional aviation careers, mimicking their teacher, who was an international airline pilot.
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