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Citizens Bank

BUSINESS
December 3, 2001 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania took control of 345 branches of Mellon Bank over the weekend, removing the name of a well-known Pennsylvania family from branches across the region. Citizens Financial Group Inc., a unit of Royal Bank of Scotland based in Providence, R.I., completed the transaction with Mellon at midnight Friday. The $2 billion deal included Pittsburgh-based Mellon's 650,000 consumer and small-business accounts, including $13.4 billion in deposits, $6.1 billion in loans, and branches in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: Niche insurer seeks investors Internet card lender crashes Here's your receipt - and a pint of ale? Royal Bank of Scotland, not content to have purchased 350 former Mellon Bank branches in Pennsylvania through its Citizens Bank subsidiary, has bought an additional 456 retail locations in the United Kingdom. Only these aren't bank branches. They are pubs. Royal Bank is paying brewer Scottish & Newcastle nearly $400 million for the chain of local taverns, about one-fifth of what it paid for the Mellon branches.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services Staff writer Marc Meltzer contributed to this report
Local customers of Mellon PSFS are about to get a new bank. The 124 Mellon branches in the area - as well as hundreds of other branches in Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey and Virginia - will be sold to Citizens Financial Group as part of a deal announced yesterday between the two banking companies. Mellon Financial Corp., parent of Mellon PSFS, said it was selling its retail banking business in those states for $2.1 billion in cash to Citizens Financial, the U.S. arm of Royal Bank of Scotland Group.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Would-be bank thieves beware: If you attempt to rob a Citizens Bank in Philadelphia, there will be a price on your head. Because of a string of unsolved robberies at six branches throughout the city, Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania announced yesterday that it is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of at-large thieves as well as future robbery suspects. The latest robbery of a Citizens Bank occurred Monday, when a gunman entered the branch at 1417 Walnut St. in Center City, showed a teller a weapon, and presented a demand note before making off with an undisclosed amount of cash.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2003 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To accommodate an increasingly 24/7 clientele, Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania said yesterday that it was extending Sunday hours to all 161 of its branches in the Philadelphia area as of this weekend. The move will catapult Citizens ahead of Cherry Hill's Commerce Bank, long identified with seven-day branch banking, in number of branches open Sunday. Commerce offers Sunday banking at 102 local branches. "We want to be there when the customer wants us," said Stephen D. Steinour, chairman and chief executive officer of Citizens Bank.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN FEDERAL COURT yesterday, a former Drexel dormitory suitemate of Chaka Fattah Jr. described the Henry Avenue apartment Fattah and his onetime freshman roommate moved to as filled with pizza boxes, big-screen television sets and two closets full of high-end clothing that Fattah wore. But he said he saw little work being done there. "They were just collecting pizza boxes," Albert Guerraty told jurors yesterday. He said he only saw Fattah laying on a couch "watching 'Law & Order' every day" and Fattah's roommate, Matthew Amato, spending time at a nearby apartment pool and bar. Yet, he said that Amato was driving a BMW, which Fattah later said cost $48,000, and that Fattah was driving a Range Rover Sport, costing $70,000.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herb Hortman, 57, of Doylestown, an airplane pilot and president of Hortman Aviation Services Inc. in Northeast Philadelphia, died Sunday, May 17, of a heart ailment at Doylestown Hospital. Mr. Hortman succeeded his father, Norman, in running one of the oldest flight schools in the region. The school has been in continuous existence for 35 years; it has been based at Northeast Philadelphia Airport since the 1980s. Dozens of Mr. Hortman's students have gone on to professional aviation careers, mimicking their teacher, who was an international airline pilot.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2015
Marian Baldini has been hired as president and CEO of KenCrest, a nonprofit Plymouth Meeting provider of human and social services for people across the age spectrum who have, or are at risk of having, intellectual disabilities and autism. She had been chief operating officer of Jewish Employment and Vocational Services of Philadelphia. Amy J. Goldberg has been appointed professor and chair of the department of surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University , surgeon-in-chief for Temple University Health System , and medical director of perioperative services at Temple University Hospital.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his company's name on the baseball park, Daniel K. Fitzpatrick, 50, president of Citizens Bank for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, spends many a fine evening at the bank's skybox, entertaining clients. But his first contact with one famous Phillie came decades earlier. Question: You pitched against Jamie Moyer when he played for St. Joe's and you were at La Salle, right? Answer: We were opposite starting pitchers in a game at La Salle in 1984. After losing that game to Jamie and St. Joe's and seeing his great command of pitch location, I knew I should study harder and prepare for a career outside of baseball.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2010 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The acrimony in the $297 million legal battle between local developer J. Brian O'Neill and Citizens Bank, and how it has played out in public, was on the mind of Common Pleas Court Judge Albert W. Sheppard Jr. at a pretrial hearing in his Philadelphia courtroom Wednesday. The judge apologized to attorneys for comments he had made to The Inquirer about how much the megalawsuit was costing to litigate. "I have a very high opinion of these lawyers involved here," he said Wednesday.
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