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Citizenship

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NEWS
March 3, 1998
Choose the best answer: (A) It's comforting to know that 73 of 100 New Jerseyans know Gov. Whitman is a Republican. (B) It's discomforting that 27 out of 100 New Jerseyans don't know. A Star-Ledger/Eagleton Poll conducted last month asked some rather simple questions about state politics. And if this had been a test, New Jersey would have flunked. Heck, it would have had to stay after school and clap erasers. Only 49 percent know that the Republicans control the state legislature.
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before becoming a U.S. citizen, Dominican immigrant Birmania Romero raised her right hand and swore to die, if need be, for the United States. It mattered little to Romero that she had fewer rights than a citizen, could not vote, and would not qualify for certain jobs. Joining the U.S. Army was something she had wanted to do since first seeing an ROTC uniform in high school in Michigan. "It's truly taking part in what's going on in the world," said the Army specialist, 22, of Grand Rapids, Mich.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Strolling down the street on a sunny day, pushing their 7-month-old son's carriage, Roberts and Olga Ancvers seemed to be a young couple facing a brighter future in newly independent Latvia. Free of the shackles of the Soviet system, this little Baltic republic is expected eventually to flourish, providing greater economic and political opportunities for Roberts and Olga, better educational chances for their son. But Roberts and Olga are facing an unexpected problem. Although both were born here, they may soon find themselves citizens of different countries.
NEWS
September 10, 2001 | MICHELLE MALKIN
I AM THE daughter of legal immigrants from the Philippines who proudly chose to become Americans. They stood in line, aced their citizenship tests, filed tons of paperwork, and - speaking in English - swore allegiance to the United States. The 206-year-old oath my parents took declares, in part: "I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty . . . I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic . . . I will bear arms on behalf of the United States . . . I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God. " For millions of naturalized Americans like my parents, the oath of allegiance is sacred.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Rich Mkhondo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Throughout the war that finally brought communism to her native Vietnam, Nguyen Nguyet Vien held on to her hope that someday she would study computer science. She told an audience at a naturalization ceremony yesterday that she began living her dream on coming to the United States six years ago. America, she said, became a "promised land. " "Even though my English is not good, I am proud of being an American citizen and the education I received here," Vien said. She graduated from Philadelphia Community College in 1984 and now works in data processing for a supermarket chain.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Chris Satullo
This spring, my household features two graduates, Sara from college, Matt from high school. So forgive a proud dad for trotting out an old columnist's chestnut: the "advice to graduates" riff. First: Yes, by all means, wear sunscreen. With homage thus done to the classic example of this genre, let me offer other earnest advice to all of you who this season will flip the tassel on your mortarboard. Much of this you may know, or will soon learn the hard, best way - by making your own mistakes.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Poet Margaret Randall, trying to stave off deportation and regain her U.S. citizenship, yesterday told a federal immigration judge that she praised Fidel Castro during her 11-year stay in Cuba, but said that had no bearing on her love for the United States. Randall acknowledged under cross-examination by immigration lawyer Lupe Gonzalez that she had praised Castro, but denied that she had joined the Communist Party or espoused communism. Gonzalez asked Randall whether she had ever described Castro as "the most brilliant, courageous world leader of our time or any time," and Randall said she had written those words.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Right up there with the Pledge of Allegiance and the "Star-Spangled Banner" is a handy piece of information every American should know: Don't leave anything of value unattended in a public place in a big city, not even for a second. Brothers Tuan and Vinh Vu learned that lesson the hard way Friday less than three hours after they became U.S. citizens in Philadelphia. A video camera, a videotape and a suitcase filled with presents were stolen from them in broad daylight. "They were devastated," said Jack Duffy, a Levittown resident and friend of the brothers.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1999 Philadelphia Award for outstanding citizenship, officials announced yesterday, is going to Cecilia Moy Yep, a grassroots activist who spent three decades revitalizing Chinatown and defending it against encroaching development. But the 70-year-old community leader said last night she has been too busy defending the enclave against its latest threat - a proposed Phillies ballpark at 12th and Vine - to revel in the high honor. Yep was thrust out of semi-retirement three weeks ago when the Street administration announced that it would consider building a 44,000-seat stadium just north of Chinatown, in addition to a handful of other locations.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Charles M. Tampio
Courage is not a willingness to take action in the face of danger without fear; courage is the determination to act despite fear. The young Americans we have asked to put their lives on the line in the name of liberty and liberation provide lessons in courage every day. Images and examples of bravery come to us now with incredible immediacy as unprecedented media coverage gives us rare glimpses into the daily sacrifices our troops are required to...
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NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Shuja Nawaz
By Shuja Nawaz Khizr Khan fired a shot across the Trump campaign bow when he asked, from the Democratic National Convention stage, whether the Republican presidential nominee had even read the U.S. Constitution. But Donald Trump miscalculated by returning verbal fire. The backlash against this counterattack has forced Trump to walk back his response. He now calls the Khans' son - U.S. Army Capt. Humayun Khan, killed in action in Iraq in 2004 - a "hero. " Yet Trump continues to paint all American Muslims with the brush of radical Islam.
NEWS
July 2, 2016
By Allen C. Guelzo It was one of the great shocks of my life, and it came early. In fifth-grade government class. Though I can't remember much else that we learned then, a detail in Article 1, Section 2, of the Constitution reached out and grabbed me like the hound of the Baskervilles: "No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the...
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The young woman became a U.S. citizen 15 years ago. But her husband, the father of her two children, is undocumented. During a visit to the Mexican consulate in Philadelphia, the Delaware couple share their story with Jeffrey S. DeCristofaro and Evelyn Sabando, who are making a presentation about the services of the Camden Center for Law and Social Justice. At the center's downtown Camden office, meanwhile, Lisa M. Incollingo handles cases like those of a Gloucester Township senior citizen and a Camden mother of five, both of whom recently got protection from an abusive family member.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
A New Jersey judge said Tuesday that GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz can appear on the New Jersey primary ballot, deciding against challengers who argued that the Canada-born Texas senator was not a "natural-born citizen. " The administrative law judge, Jeff Masin, said that arguments that a person born in another country could not be a natural-born citizen were "not facetious," and that the subject would "never be entirely free of doubt" without a U.S. Supreme Court ruling. But "the more persuasive legal analysis is that such a child, born of a citizen-father, citizen-mother, or both, is indeed a 'natural-born citizen' within the contemplation of the Constitution," he said in a 27-page decision.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Jason Rezaian Rezaian, a reporter with the Washington Post, was detained in July 2014 when Iranian security forces raided his home and seized his wife and him. Rezaian, who was born in California and holds both U.S. and Iranian citizenship, was convicted in closed proceedings last year after being charged with espionage and related allegations. The length of his sentence has not been disclosed. The Post and the U.S. government have denied the accusations, as has Rezaian. His wife, Yeganeh Salehi, was released on bail in October 2014.
NEWS
November 13, 2015
THIS WILL DRIVE the enablers of the undocumented nuts: On a key "immigration" issue, Bernie Sanders and I hold an identical view - and mine's been on the table for nine years. Bern and Byko - perfect together! Like it or not, "immigration" is part of our national debate and is already part of the presidential debate. I use "immigration" in quotes because I notice the media has all but dropped the word "illegal" when discussing "immigrants" who are here without papers. That is Politically Correct and designed to blur the distinction between legal and illegal behavior.
NEWS
October 21, 2015
BEFORE Karla Marquez came to America, she had no idea how bad things were in Mexico. This was 2006, she was 18 and scored an internship for international students at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. When she arrived, she thought she knew how to speak English, "but I really didn't," she discovered, so she took classes and learned. Her job was in hotel food and beverage, and that's where she met Penn State student Michael Eisenhart, but I am getting ahead of the story. "When I came to the U.S.," she says, "I realized that I was happy.
NEWS
September 3, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Foreshadowing a theme that Pope Francis is expected to trumpet on his forthcoming visit here, Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput waded into the nation's fierce debate on immigration Tuesday. He outlined the social costs of a "flawed immigration system. " He reprised a Christian's obligation "to protect migrant families. " The address he titled "Sanity, Indifference, and the American Immigration Debate" took a poke at Republican White House candidate Donald Trump. "At least one of our presidential candidates has already made the national immigration debate ugly with a great deal of belligerent bombast," he told participants at a three-hour panel discussion that drew about 130 people to the archdiocesan pastoral center in Center City.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley Amland threw it off. So did Ingrid Bracke. Rhoda May Derksen ditched hers, too. The names, picked at random for this article from the Federal Register, are among the 3,415 Americans who renounced their U.S. citizenship or relinquished their residency permits last year. As a national debate rages about "anchor babies" and the constitutional amendment that grants "birthright citizenship" to anyone born on U.S. soil, a record number of Americans and green-card holders are becoming ex-Americans.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Born in Poland in 1941, Erhard Wensel was 11 when he and his family became legal residents of the United States. Drafted by the Army in 1967, he spent a year in Vietnam as a cook with the Fourth Infantry Division, and earned a citation for "meritorious service in support of allied counterinsurgency operations. " One day, he fell into conversation with a lieutenant who knew he had a green card but not citizenship. "Do you want to be a citizen?" the officer asked. "I do," said Wensel, "but I ship out in three weeks.
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