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Citizenship

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NEWS
March 3, 1998
Choose the best answer: (A) It's comforting to know that 73 of 100 New Jerseyans know Gov. Whitman is a Republican. (B) It's discomforting that 27 out of 100 New Jerseyans don't know. A Star-Ledger/Eagleton Poll conducted last month asked some rather simple questions about state politics. And if this had been a test, New Jersey would have flunked. Heck, it would have had to stay after school and clap erasers. Only 49 percent know that the Republicans control the state legislature.
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before becoming a U.S. citizen, Dominican immigrant Birmania Romero raised her right hand and swore to die, if need be, for the United States. It mattered little to Romero that she had fewer rights than a citizen, could not vote, and would not qualify for certain jobs. Joining the U.S. Army was something she had wanted to do since first seeing an ROTC uniform in high school in Michigan. "It's truly taking part in what's going on in the world," said the Army specialist, 22, of Grand Rapids, Mich.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Strolling down the street on a sunny day, pushing their 7-month-old son's carriage, Roberts and Olga Ancvers seemed to be a young couple facing a brighter future in newly independent Latvia. Free of the shackles of the Soviet system, this little Baltic republic is expected eventually to flourish, providing greater economic and political opportunities for Roberts and Olga, better educational chances for their son. But Roberts and Olga are facing an unexpected problem. Although both were born here, they may soon find themselves citizens of different countries.
NEWS
September 10, 2001 | MICHELLE MALKIN
I AM THE daughter of legal immigrants from the Philippines who proudly chose to become Americans. They stood in line, aced their citizenship tests, filed tons of paperwork, and - speaking in English - swore allegiance to the United States. The 206-year-old oath my parents took declares, in part: "I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty . . . I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic . . . I will bear arms on behalf of the United States . . . I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God. " For millions of naturalized Americans like my parents, the oath of allegiance is sacred.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Rich Mkhondo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Throughout the war that finally brought communism to her native Vietnam, Nguyen Nguyet Vien held on to her hope that someday she would study computer science. She told an audience at a naturalization ceremony yesterday that she began living her dream on coming to the United States six years ago. America, she said, became a "promised land. " "Even though my English is not good, I am proud of being an American citizen and the education I received here," Vien said. She graduated from Philadelphia Community College in 1984 and now works in data processing for a supermarket chain.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Chris Satullo
This spring, my household features two graduates, Sara from college, Matt from high school. So forgive a proud dad for trotting out an old columnist's chestnut: the "advice to graduates" riff. First: Yes, by all means, wear sunscreen. With homage thus done to the classic example of this genre, let me offer other earnest advice to all of you who this season will flip the tassel on your mortarboard. Much of this you may know, or will soon learn the hard, best way - by making your own mistakes.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Poet Margaret Randall, trying to stave off deportation and regain her U.S. citizenship, yesterday told a federal immigration judge that she praised Fidel Castro during her 11-year stay in Cuba, but said that had no bearing on her love for the United States. Randall acknowledged under cross-examination by immigration lawyer Lupe Gonzalez that she had praised Castro, but denied that she had joined the Communist Party or espoused communism. Gonzalez asked Randall whether she had ever described Castro as "the most brilliant, courageous world leader of our time or any time," and Randall said she had written those words.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Right up there with the Pledge of Allegiance and the "Star-Spangled Banner" is a handy piece of information every American should know: Don't leave anything of value unattended in a public place in a big city, not even for a second. Brothers Tuan and Vinh Vu learned that lesson the hard way Friday less than three hours after they became U.S. citizens in Philadelphia. A video camera, a videotape and a suitcase filled with presents were stolen from them in broad daylight. "They were devastated," said Jack Duffy, a Levittown resident and friend of the brothers.
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1999 Philadelphia Award for outstanding citizenship, officials announced yesterday, is going to Cecilia Moy Yep, a grassroots activist who spent three decades revitalizing Chinatown and defending it against encroaching development. But the 70-year-old community leader said last night she has been too busy defending the enclave against its latest threat - a proposed Phillies ballpark at 12th and Vine - to revel in the high honor. Yep was thrust out of semi-retirement three weeks ago when the Street administration announced that it would consider building a 44,000-seat stadium just north of Chinatown, in addition to a handful of other locations.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Charles M. Tampio
Courage is not a willingness to take action in the face of danger without fear; courage is the determination to act despite fear. The young Americans we have asked to put their lives on the line in the name of liberty and liberation provide lessons in courage every day. Images and examples of bravery come to us now with incredible immediacy as unprecedented media coverage gives us rare glimpses into the daily sacrifices our troops are required to...
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NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Born in Poland in 1941, Erhard Wensel was 11 when he and his family became legal residents of the United States. Drafted by the Army in 1967, he spent a year in Vietnam as a cook with the Fourth Infantry Division, and earned a citation for "meritorious service in support of allied counterinsurgency operations. " One day, he fell into conversation with a lieutenant who knew he had a green card but not citizenship. "Do you want to be a citizen?" the officer asked. "I do," said Wensel, "but I ship out in three weeks.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
COUNCILMAN Denny O'Brien won a small victory yesterday when a Council committee approved a bill that would give added protections to immigrants seeking citizenship but who get scammed along the way. City Council's Committee on Licenses and Inspections approved the measure on "notario" (Spanish for "notary" or "lawyer") fraud, which takes advantage of people seeking U.S. citizenship and paying for services that do them no good. The legislation would establish new licensing requirements, standards and protections and create penalties to better regulate immigration-assistance services.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Breaking from the antiamnesty, secure-the-border hawkishness coursing through the national Republican Party, New Jersey's GOP nominee for a U.S. Senate seat says he would fight for "comprehensive immigration reform" in Washington. And like many Republicans, Jeff Bell is claiming the mantle of Ronald Reagan. "Ronald Reagan once said, 'Latinos are Republicans - they just don't know it yet.' Maybe that's politically incorrect to repeat in 2014," Bell wrote in an e-mail to supporters Wednesday.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
COUNCILMAN Dennis O'Brien says a back-alley scam is happening right under our noses and he wants to put a stop to it. O'Brien introduced a bill yesterday that would establish new licensing requirements, standards, protections and penalties to better regulate immigration-assistance services. What does that mean, exactly? Con artists and frauds preying on those seeking citizenship reportedly have left immigrants in financial ruin, taking advantage of language barriers, impoverished or desperate situations or worse.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
There's an easy way to describe House Republicans' continued reluctance to pass an immigration overhaul that provides a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people residing in this country illegally: selfish. Republican former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour didn't use that word during a recent Bipartisan Policy Center forum on immigration at the University of Pennsylvania, but he might as well have. Barbour noted that, unlike GOP presidential candidates running nationally, Republican House members seeking reelection in largely safe districts don't care about courting Hispanic voters by endorsing immigration reform.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was 12, Edwin Brizuela tried to cross the border from Mexico to Arizona five times, on one occasion spending the night in a detention facility. When he eventually made it that year, he joined his parents, who had immigrated previously, and thought his family's challenges were over. "For a lot of us, it's worse here than in our own country," said Brizuela, 21, who now lives in Pennsauken. "They keep us in the shadows. We're not criminals. We just want to work. " Brizuela joined about 50 people Monday in Camden to launch a 150-mile, nine-day Pilgrimage for Citizenship organized by PICO New Jersey, a faith-based nonprofit organization, and Camden Churches Organized for People.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ed Rendell - 45th governor of Pennsylvania, 96th mayor of Philadelphia, former head of the Democratic National Committee - likes to lead. Now he's out front again, cochairing a task force of the D.C.-based, nonprofit Bipartisan Policy Center, traveling the country - next stop, Biloxi - and urging Congress to pass immigration reform. He took questions on the run. Question: Lawmakers are swamped: Syria, the debt ceiling, a possible shutdown of the government next week. Does immigration stand a chance?
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
We the people" grew a few dozen members stronger this Constitution Day. On the holiday that marks the anniversary of the adoption of the Constitution, 48 new Americans swore allegiance to the law of the land in a naturalization ceremony just across from Independence Hall. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova presided over the oath of citizenship at the National Constitution Center. "What a wonderful choice for you and your families, for your families' families," he said. "This choice will be part of your heritage.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Igor Kopytoff, 83, a University of Pennsylvania anthropology professor who traveled the world before settling in Philadelphia to live for most of his life, died Friday, Aug. 9, from complications related to Parkinson's disease at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Kopytoff was born in 1930 after his Russian parents fled to China to escape the Russian Revolution, said his daughter, Larissa Kopytoff. He and his brother were raised mostly in Shanghai, and through schooling, he learned to speak English and French but never Chinese, because he lived in a community of Russian refugees.
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