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NEWS
November 1, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Jerome Lawrence and his playwriting collaborator of nearly 50 years, Robert E. Lee, hold Philadelphia in high esteem and not a little affection. Fourteen of their plays were launched here, notably "Inherit the Wind" and the musical "Mame," starring Angela Lansbury, which ultimately racked up 1,508 performances on Broadway and blew Lawrence to the commodious Malibu hillside house that is still his home. Lawrence, 76, hale, hearty and voluble, also remembers Philadelphia as the city of the middle-of-the-night rewrite - those with long memories will recall its tradition as a hallowed testing ground for new plays en route to Broadway - a rigorous activity fraught with the occupational disease of writer's block.
NEWS
August 1, 2006
RE MARCIANNE Waters' op-ed "Hey, you, get offa my road!" (July 28): I could not agree with her more. In fact, I suggest the following: 1. Allow ONLY New Jersey drivers on the N.J. Turnpike. 2) Restrict ALL New Jersey drivers from driving in Philadelphia. Since the transition from strip malls and gas stations to city blocks and stop signs has proven to be too much for New Jersey drivers, this is a compromise we can all enjoy. Stefan Weinberg, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 4, 1997
To all the traditional challenges of making a go of it in retail, add the threat of sales in cyberspace. The growing commerce over the Internet scares folks who know retail - and who realize its key role in revitalizing downtowns and neighborhood commercial strips. The more people who download orders, the fewer will beat a path to your door, the thinking goes. So what's a shop owner to do? And how can government and civic groups lend a helping hand? Center City District (CCD)
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Organizers of Hands Across Philadelphia, a citywide, antiviolence demonstration scheduled for Saturday, are encouraging people interested in participating or volunteering time to attend a meeting at 6 p.m. Wednesday in the United Way Building, 7 Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Coordinators from different parts of the city will be on hand. During the event, scheduled for 4:30 to 6 p.m., participants will link hands along 120 city blocks in a symbolic stand against violence. Organizers are hoping about 8,000 people will take part and stand along Market Street from 63d to 15th Streets; along South Broad Street from Snyder Avenue to City Hall; around City Hall; and north on Broad to Olney Avenue.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
As an architect, a city planner, and a 40-year resident of the waterfront, I am dumbfounded to discover that the most recent proposal for Philadelphia's waterfront neglects to include some of the most fundamental characteristics that define a successful waterfront ("Master plan for riverfront nearly ready," Oct. 20). There is not a single mention of the boats, water, river, famous historical ships, marinas, ferry boats, and existing dockside hotels, apartments, and established restaurants that are integral to an attractive waterfront.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE STREETS of Philadelphia are finally clear of snow and ice, but there's something else gumming up the gutters. Trash. And lots of it, in some of the city's more isolated areas. The recent "extreme low temperatures" caused delays in the Streets Department's trash-collection schedule, according to a news release from Mayor Nutter's office, leaving some city blocks cluttered. Residents are encouraged to keep bringing their trash to the curb on their normally scheduled pickup days even if previous piles haven't been cleared, a representative from Philly311 said yesterday.
SPORTS
June 16, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
A paintball shot in the groin left rookie LaRon Landry unable to practice when the Washington Redskins opened their minicamp yesterday. The No. 6 overall pick in this year's draft was injured during a team-building outing Wednesday, when coach Joe Gibbs allowed the players to leave early at the end of the voluntary spring workouts. Some players went bowling or had lunch together, while many of the defensive players went to play paintball. "I didn't know paintball was that dangerous," linebacker Marcus Washington said.
SPORTS
December 7, 1991 | By Joe Santoliquito, Special to The Inquirer
Roman Catholic and Franklin Learning Center - two Philadelphia basketball powers separated by several city blocks - will meet for the "neighborhood championship" 320 miles across the state tonight in the championship of the third annual Latrobe Rotary Invitational Tournament. Roman (1-0) had no problem manhandling Greater Latrobe (0-1), the host school, 68-46, last night, while Franklin Learning Center (2-0) started slow against Hempfield (0-1) before pulling away to an 82-61 victory to set up tonight's final.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By W. Russell G. Byers
Philadelphia's proposal to take over an office-building lease for Cigna Corp. makes it clear that the city is prepared to put a lot of money on the table to save 4,400 jobs. Should it go even further? By sweetening the offer, might the city be able to convince Cigna of an exciting rebirth of North Philadelphia? North Philadelphia is a disgrace to the city and a living hell for those forced to survive in the jungle of its streets. It was aptly described last year by Op-ed Page national columnist Neal Peirce as "America's answer to the Holocaust Museum.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took three years of negotiations before William Burnley was satisfied with the deal offered by Temple University. A go-getter on dismal Cecil B. Moore Avenue, Burnley owns Billy Jean's House of Beauty, Campus Variety and Discount, and a wholesale house called BB Distributors. He's a black businessman who says the most important color is green. "The bottom line is if Temple wants something, let Temple give something," Burnley says. "That's been my whole philosophy. " What Temple wants is an $85 million super-arena - the vaunted Apollo of Temple - and connected 1,200-car parking garage across the street from Burnley's neighborhood enterprises.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
When Joyce Smith moved to Viola Street in East Parkside in 2006, she took a look around at the blighted Victorian-style homes that lined the blocks. She and her neighbors lived just a block from Fairmount Park and the museums of the Centennial Historic District, but they felt a world apart. "We're going to do something about this," she thought. And she did. She helped form the Viola Street Residents Association in 2009. The scrappy grassroots group has relentlessly sought out every opportunity to better its block, from restoring once-beautiful houses with Habitat for Humanity to drawing up a lauded neighborhood revitalization plan.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE STREETS of Philadelphia are finally clear of snow and ice, but there's something else gumming up the gutters. Trash. And lots of it, in some of the city's more isolated areas. The recent "extreme low temperatures" caused delays in the Streets Department's trash-collection schedule, according to a news release from Mayor Nutter's office, leaving some city blocks cluttered. Residents are encouraged to keep bringing their trash to the curb on their normally scheduled pickup days even if previous piles haven't been cleared, a representative from Philly311 said yesterday.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
A traveling carnival operation that was supposed to open Thursday to raise money for NAACP scholarships is still looking for a venue, after losing a bid to set up on city land in Hunting Park. "We don't allow carnivals," said Michael DiBerardinis, the deputy mayor in charge of parks and recreation. "Historically they've presented problems to us - there was a homicide attached to one at Russo Playground in the early 2000s . . .. No matter how well they're run, there's a lot of wear and tear and usually damage to the facilities, with all this heavy equipment and the crowds.
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
THE PALESTRA'S court is just a liiiiiitle wider than Roman Catholic's. By a couple of city blocks, maybe. If anyone knows, and appreciates, that exaggerated fact, it's swingman Kyle Thompson, a 6-2, 175-pound junior at St. Joseph's Prep. On Feb. 3, when the Prep dropped a 62-58 decision at Roman in a regular-season Catholic League game, Thompson might as well have stayed home. His specialty is sniping three-point shots from the corner, and at Roman, that's just not possible, seeing as how the arc meets the sideline halfway from the foul line to baseline.
SPORTS
January 30, 2012 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
OTTAWA - With snowflakes falling outside a quaint pizza bar in the downtown ByWard Market, just steps from Parliament Hill, a giddy waiter ran to the cash register on Saturday, carefully cradling a gold credit card. "Do you know who this is?!" the excited waiter said to his bartender, pointing to the embossed name on the card. "Claude Giroux?" replied the bartender, more hipster than hockey fan. "Who is that?" Just a few months ago, in the city where he spends his summers training, Giroux would have been able to remain nestled anonymously in the back of one of his favorite restaurants unbothered.
NEWS
November 6, 2011 | By Quan Nguyen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A block that turned around dramatically in just four months won the city's Clean Block Contest on Friday. The winner was 3600 N. Marvine St., in North Philadelphia. Block captain Lawrence Burgess, who spearheaded the cleaning efforts, was ecstatic when he heard his group had won. "Thank you, Jesus," he exclaimed when his block was named the winner. He described his reaction as: "Just happiness. It's like togetherness. " He added: "I was tired of my block looking mediocre.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
As an architect, a city planner, and a 40-year resident of the waterfront, I am dumbfounded to discover that the most recent proposal for Philadelphia's waterfront neglects to include some of the most fundamental characteristics that define a successful waterfront ("Master plan for riverfront nearly ready," Oct. 20). There is not a single mention of the boats, water, river, famous historical ships, marinas, ferry boats, and existing dockside hotels, apartments, and established restaurants that are integral to an attractive waterfront.
NEWS
March 14, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At least one slots parlor could be open in Philadelphia by the end of the year if Mayor Nutter gets his way. At a news conference yesterday to "provide clarity" on his casino stand, Nutter said he fully supports the Foxwoods and SugarHouse casino projects and would do everything in his power to help both get built. "We will move as quickly as possible to get casinos up and running as soon as we can," the mayor said. The announcement follows recent criticism from Gov. Rendell and some state legislators that the Nutter administration has caused delays in the casinos' construction.
SPORTS
June 16, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
A paintball shot in the groin left rookie LaRon Landry unable to practice when the Washington Redskins opened their minicamp yesterday. The No. 6 overall pick in this year's draft was injured during a team-building outing Wednesday, when coach Joe Gibbs allowed the players to leave early at the end of the voluntary spring workouts. Some players went bowling or had lunch together, while many of the defensive players went to play paintball. "I didn't know paintball was that dangerous," linebacker Marcus Washington said.
NEWS
August 8, 2006
Soupy Island always offered a whiff of fun and freedom Re "Soup's still on!" (July 14), by Jan Hefler: I have very fond memories of Soupy Island. My single mother of five made a day of it many times. We walked several city blocks to the Port Richmond dock to get the ferry to the "island" during the blazing summer days of the 1950s, escaping the sweltering heat from blocks and blocks of bricks and concrete. Reading the article, I could smell the gasoline and hear the paddles slicing the water moving on down the Delaware River to this special place.
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