CollectionsCity Clerk
IN THE NEWS

City Clerk

NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The National Review, a conservative magazine and website, is suing Newark Mayor Cory Booker, the city, and Newark police, accusing them of stonewalling public records requests. A city spokesman said a response would be delivered by Thursday as indicated in an Aug. 30 letter from the city clerk to National Review. He said the city had received no objection. The National Review argues in its suit that the legal time frame for producing the records had passed and accused Newark of "stringing along" a reporter with delays.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden City Council last night revived a plan to have some of its members elected from wards, only days after city Democratic leaders failed in a petition drive to get such a measure on the November ballot. The plan was reviewed at a council caucus meeting yesterday and will be introduced for first reading at the council meeting tomorrow. The measure would keep council at the same size but would have three of its seven members run at-large and four elected from wards. Now, all council members run at-large.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer
A group of Burlington City residents will have their second day in court tomorrow in an effort to get city officials to accept a petition calling for a change in the city's form of government. If accepted, voters will decide in November whether or not to reduce the 12-member council to five members. The five-member group, which calls itself the Burlington City Taxpayers Association, has taken the city to court in an attempt to have the petition accepted. On Thursday, attorneys for the residents and city presented arguments to County Superior Court Judge Martin L. Haines, who postponed his decision on the case until tomorrow.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mary Moran has accumulated more than 130 sick days at her job as city clerk, and now she can reap some benefit from the stockpile without getting sick. Under a resolution passed Monday by the City Council, Moran and nine other nonunion city employees who accumulate 50 sick days can sell 15 of them back to the city each year. The employees will receive half a day's pay for each day they sell back. The resolution applies, among others, to the city clerk, the police chief, the deputy fire chief and some of the public library directors.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Lee Maxwell, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester City Council on Tuesday postponed considering a request by administrator Gary Ruggierio to hire an attorney to represent him in a lawsuit filed against him by three members of the City Council and the city clerk. The council is expected to take up Ruggierio's request at a caucus at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the municipal building at 512 Monmouth St. The city attorney, William Ruggierio of Marlton, who is Gary Ruggiero's brother, ruled that the council could not discuss Gary Ruggierio's request at Monday's special meeting because the matter had not been published in the city's official newspapers as required by the state's Sunshine Law. Gary Ruggierio said he sent a memo to city clerk Thomas Kilcourse the previous Thursday asking that his request be included on the agenda as an "emergent matter" and said it was Kilcourse's responsibility to notify the newspapers.
NEWS
September 7, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican Senate candidate Steve Lonegan has toured New Jersey, holding dramatic news conferences to blast rival Democratic Newark Mayor Cory Booker's record on crime at the site of a double homicide, discuss political correctness, and denounce a potential U.S. military strike on Syria. On Thursday, Lonegan returned his fiery, sometimes unpredictable, campaign to Newark, this time to the steps of City Hall, to announce he was suing the office of the city clerk over its alleged failure to comply with a public-records request for information on Booker's expenditures as mayor.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By Sheri Sheeran-Garvey, Special to The Inquirer
After working for six months without a contract, about 60 unionized employees of Burlington City were granted a 5 percent across-the-board salary increase Tuesday night. Nonunion employees also received raises under the 1987 salary ordinance approved by the City Council. "We are satisfied with this pay raise," said John Lazzarotti, president of Local 1044 of the Communications Workers of America, which represents about half of Burlington City's 125 municipal employees. "However, much too much time has been taken to get this ordinance passed.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge Monday temporarily blocked a planned Camden City Council vote that ultimately could put in the hands of voters a decision on whether to dismantle the city's police department in favor of a county force. Judge Faustino J. Fernandez-Vina decided to hear arguments June 11 on a complaint filed by Mayor Dana L. Redd and President Frank Moran that maintaining the department could cause the city "irreparable harm. " He issued an order preventing the city clerk from certifying before the Council a petition with more than 2,000 signatures requesting that Council vote on a proposed ordinance to maintain the department and, if the ordinance is rejected, the voters would get to decide what to do. A vote had been scheduled for Tuesday.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A showdown between a grassroots organization and the City of Camden over the $215 million contract to privatize the city's water and sewer services has been scheduled for May 22 in Superior Court, attorneys said yesterday. The hearing on two opposing motions for summary judgment will be held before Judge Francis J. Orlando, the attorneys said. Meanwhile, a Camden councilman said he plans a showdown of a different sort over the deal next week, when he intends to introduce an ordinance to rescind the 20-year contract.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Democratic Party activist and former city clerk who was fired last month as an administrative aide at the Chester Economic Development Authority has initiated a complaint with the federal Equal Opportunity Employment Commission alleging racial bias at the authority. Her allegations were denied yesterday by officials at the authority. Sheila Hyland, 47, said that her troubles began at a May 3 staff meeting when Dianne Merlino, the authority's chairwoman, remarked that "Chester High School graduates can't read.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|