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NEWS
October 8, 2004 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year after being rescued from the floor of a dimly lit room in City Hall, Lord Camden is still waiting for his big makeover. The frayed, flaking oil portrait of the British aristocrat, who gave Camden its name, was transferred last October from a Council anteroom to the Camden County Historical Society for safekeeping. From there, the image of His Lordship - in a flowing wig and fur-lined robe - was to be moved to a conservator's studio for a $5,000 refurbishing. But Lord Camden's subjects have raised only a couple of hundred dollars, leaving him still a lord-in-waiting.
NEWS
October 24, 2003 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Poor Lord Camden. The oil portrait of the British aristocrat, who gave the city its name, had hung in Council's chambers for more than 60 years, slowly deteriorating while the city conducted its business. Then came the final indignity. The flaking, frayed image of His Lordship - resplendent in a flowing wig and fur-lined robe - was taken down in the late 1980s and left on the floor of a dim Council anteroom. And that was where it had remained, propped against a wall along with folding tables and chairs, until its rediscovery last winter during the renovation of Council's chambers.
NEWS
January 27, 2003 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Already battle-scarred from the July 4 fire that killed six, this close-knit community was hit by two more blazes during the weekend. One person died yesterday in a quickly controlled two-alarm blaze at a Gloucester City hotel. And on Saturday, a fire at a three-story house injured three firefighters, a city official and his wife, and left the couple and their six children homeless. Another South Jersey town, Maple Shade, was hit by fire Saturday when a five-alarm blaze destroyed 33 units at the Village of Stoney Run, leaving more than 50 people homeless.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayoral candidate Keith Aaron Walker and his two City Council running mates have won their legal battle to get on the May 8 ballot. The only hurdle left is for Municipal Clerk Luis Pastoriza to certify their petitions, which he refused to do March 15. Pastoriza rejected the petitions because he said that the three candidates arrived three minutes past the 4 p.m. deadline. Yesterday, Superior Court Judge M. Alan Vogelson ruled that the city clerk must accept Walker's petitions, as well as those of his running mates, businessman David Garrison and the Rev. Christopher Collins.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Keith Aaron Walker said yesterday that he is still in the race to become Camden's next mayor and will go to court Monday to fight to get his name on the ballot. "I am not out of this race," Walker said, leaning back in his chair and puffing on a cigar in his campaign office. "I intend to be mayor of Camden . . .. " Walker, 43, a major in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, missed the filing deadline for a place on the ballot by three minutes on Thursday. Walker arrived at the City Clerk's office with his two councilmanic running mates, businessman Dave Garrison and the Rev. Chris Collins, and his petitions and related documents at 4:03 p.m., according to the city clerk.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A notice of an intention to recall Camden Mayor Milton Milan was certified yesterday by the city clerk. Organizers of the drive said they expected to have petitioners on the street by the weekend. The organizers will receive formal notice of the certification by mail within three working days, and the mayor will be notified within five working days. "We're off and running," said Councilman Ali Sloan El, one of the leaders of the drive. "We'll be stopping people at the groceries.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a competitive mayor's race at the top of the ticket, the contests for city commissioner, sheriff, register of wills and clerk of quarter sessions have attracted little attention and are unlikely to do so. With one exception, each of these low-visibility "row offices" is held by a longtime Democratic incumbent. One of them, Alexander Z. Talmadge Jr., a Democratic city commissioner, said in a recent interview that the only way he could see the Democratic incumbents losing was if the Sam Katz-John Street mayoral contest generated enough straight-ticket GOP voting to damage the bottom of the Democratic ticket.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Think of it as a little bit of Paris in downtown Woodbury. Restaurateurs and other food and beverage merchants along Broad Street will soon be able to open sidewalk cafes in front of their stores. City Council introduced an ordinance at its meeting Tuesday night that would permit outdoor seating and provide licenses for merchants. City officials said they hoped the sidewalk cafes would stimulate the downtown economy and add an aesthetically pleasing touch to the city's downtown business district.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A showdown between a grassroots organization and the City of Camden over the $215 million contract to privatize the city's water and sewer services has been scheduled for May 22 in Superior Court, attorneys said yesterday. The hearing on two opposing motions for summary judgment will be held before Judge Francis J. Orlando, the attorneys said. Meanwhile, a Camden councilman said he plans a showdown of a different sort over the deal next week, when he intends to introduce an ordinance to rescind the 20-year contract.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Nancy Phillips contributed to this article
Three top Milan administration officials have resigned recently, creating key vacancies in the city's legal department and at the helm of the city's Department of Utilities as the city tries to privatize its water service. Senior assistant city attorney Dennis Kille, a fixture in city government for nearly two decades, submitted his resignation Monday, becoming the second lawyer to announce that he was leaving that office in the last week. Assistant city attorney Calvin Fisher abruptly resigned on Friday without explanation.
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