CollectionsCity Jail
IN THE NEWS

City Jail

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 6, 1990
The Philadelphia District Attorney's office and the Goode administration are close to agreement on a plan that would offer reduced prison sentences to city jail inmates willing to work. If adopted, it could provide some needed relief for the city's overcrowded jails. As currently envisoned, inmates could knock a day off their minimum sentences for every day they work, although in any given work week they could reduce their sentences a maximum of two days. District Attorney Ronald Castille is insisting that the work be real - either formal prison jobs or jobs in the community - while the city wants to include tasks such as tidying up the inmate's own cell block.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The public defender for accused rapist Jose Carrasquillo asked in February that he be transferred from a Philadelphia jail because the guards there were targeting him for "almost daily harassment and physical abuse," according to court records. Two months later, Carrasquillo got into a fight with correctional officers, a confrontation his aunt said left him in a coma for days with head injuries. The aunt, Isabel Carrasquillo, said relatives had not been allowed to see him. The FBI has launched an investigation and requested records related to the incident involving Carrasquillo, a sergeant, and four officers, authorities said.
NEWS
November 28, 2009 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An accused murderer pulled off a daring escape from a city jail Thursday afternoon, police said yesterday, slipping away from a visitors' lobby after getting past a dozen jail employees and two locked doors and, in the meantime, changing into civilian clothes. Oscar Alvarado, 27, who had been held at the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility on State Road since October 2008, vanished between 3 and 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving, officials said. Authorities noticed he was gone around 6 and, after searching the prison grounds, began scouring the city.
NEWS
May 29, 2015
ONE PIECE of good news this week was the $150,000 grant the MacArthur Foundation gave to the Philadelphia prison system to study ways to shrink the population in city jails. The timing couldn't be better. Council is set to deliberate a bill to purchase a tract of land near the Delaware River to build a new city jail with the stated aim of replacing the city's 90-year-old House of Correction, which houses 1,500 inmates in crowded conditions. Some are protesting the site for the prison - along an increasingly valuable and active stretch of riverfront.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
Lawyers for city jail inmates yesterday unveiled a three-pronged attack on Mayor Rendell's latest effort to lift the prison cap, calling Rendell's move unconstitutional, misguided and unwarranted. With a 57-page brief filed in federal court, lead attorney David Richman and three colleagues disclosed for the first time their plan to counter the city's effort to undo the cap with the new federal crime law. The brief sets the stage for a hearing on Oct. 31 before U.S. District Judge Norma L. Shapiro, who has presided over the prison overcrowding case since it was filed in 1982.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Criminal justice agencies are speeding up the flow of city jail inmates to an underused drug-treatment facility in North Philadelphia, easing the threat of cutbacks in the center's programs. As of yesterday afternoon, the Greater Philadelphia Center for Community Corrections (GPCCC) facility was housing 169 residents, the highest number since opening about a year ago. David D. Fawkner, GPCCC president, said it now seemed probable the center would soon reach a count of 226 clients - the number needed to avoid program cutbacks.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | By JACK McGUIRE, Daily News Staff Writer
The undercover narcotics cop got a stern warning from his wife yesterday. "She told me don't be a hero. Don't even arrest anybody," he said. The reaction of police officers to a judge's order that the city jail only suspects accused of the most serious crimes ranged from concern to disgust. "It's a disgrace," the officer said as he and other undercover narcotics officers discussed the order with a reporter. "They're making us second-class citizens," he added. He said his wife gave him his orders as he was leaving for his 4 p.m.-to-midnight shift.
SPORTS
January 29, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Former Georgetown player Kevin Millen pleaded guilty yesterday to stalking former coach John Thompson. Millen also pleaded guilty to unlawful entry on the Georgetown campus, in an agreement between prosecutors and defense attorneys. D.C. Superior Court Judge Anita Josey-Herring could sentence Millen to up to 18 months in jail, but attorneys in the case have agreed to recommend probation. Under the plea agreement, Millen is barred from contacting Georgetown University, or its current or former staff, during the length of his probation.
SPORTS
February 1, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Former NFL defensive back Nelson Munsey pleaded innocent to a variety of weapons charges, two days after being involved in a standoff with a SWAT team. Munsey, 47, had his bail reduced from $5,000 to $1,000 at Municipal Court in San Diego yesterday and was transferred from the city jail to the county jail. A readiness hearing has been scheduled for Feb. 14. If he doesn't agree to a plea bargain by then, the case will go to a preliminary hearing, a spokeswoman for the district attorney's office said.
NEWS
December 18, 2002 | By DAN GERINGER geringd@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Never shy about showing his feelings, Municipal Judge Seamus McCaffery caustically called Audrey McDaniels "mother of the year" before ordering her to stand trial for murder in the starvation death of her helpless, autistic stepson. Brahim Dukes, 18, was pronounced dead at Frankford Hospital Dec. 29, 2001, following a 911 call to McDaniels' home. Authorities said the 5-foot-9 teen-ager weighed 94 pounds, had no food in his stomach, allegedly hadn't eaten in two weeks and was covered with sores.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
As New York City prepares to do away with cash bail for thousands of low-level offenders charged with nonviolent crimes, Jim Kenney is weighing a bail proposal for Philadelphia, part of a broader plan to address the city's overcrowded prisons in the event that he wins the mayor's office this fall. Kenney's campaign spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, declined to provide details on what he is considering. But she said Kenney, who in May won the Democratic nomination for mayor, is looking to reduce the city's prison population while ending what she called "the epidemic of nonviolent offenders being kept in prison because of their inability to make nominal bails.
NEWS
May 29, 2015
ONE PIECE of good news this week was the $150,000 grant the MacArthur Foundation gave to the Philadelphia prison system to study ways to shrink the population in city jails. The timing couldn't be better. Council is set to deliberate a bill to purchase a tract of land near the Delaware River to build a new city jail with the stated aim of replacing the city's 90-year-old House of Correction, which houses 1,500 inmates in crowded conditions. Some are protesting the site for the prison - along an increasingly valuable and active stretch of riverfront.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FRED AVERY JR. is a convicted murderer with a long, violent rap sheet, so it's unlikely that many people were surprised when he allegedly stabbed three prison guards at a city jail last Monday as they tried to subdue him after he fought with his cellmate. But what did surprise some was that Avery was still in jail - and not in a mental institution in Norristown. Arrested 19 months ago, the 49-year-old Ogontz man remains in a legal limbo because of his mental status. He's been declared incompetent to stand trial - but has been waiting for nine months for space to open up at Norristown State Hospital, where he must be treated before his competency can be re-evaluated.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As security guard Carlos Cadiz walked down the sixth-floor hallway around 2:30 a.m. making his nightly rounds, the air around him started to feel cooler, denser. He fought back an overwhelming feeling that someone was striding along with him, close but not quite touching his arm. Suddenly, a locked door leading to the old jail started rattling violently. "I just ran for the elevator," said Cadiz, a guard at Camden City Hall. "I got out of there fast as I could. " This month, with the help of 10 paranormal investigators who blanketed the sixth floor with spirit-detection technology, Cadiz was introduced to his walking mate.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE MORNING OF FEB. 7, Rasheed Kellam had a full schedule. He picked up his tax-refund check, visited his doctor, cashed the check, checked in with his parole officer, grabbed his blood-pressure medication from Rite Aid and got a hot dog at 7-Eleven. Then, steps outside his Feltonville home, he got arrested. For nearly a year, he sat in a city jail, unsure why exactly. In that time, a secret grand jury investigated and eventually indicted him in a home-invasion robbery targeting a couple who lived a half-mile away from him.   An easy alibi Two months before his trial, prosecutors sent Kellam's lawyer the evidence they had against him - which became the key to his exoneration.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Kevin Mcgill, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - A political brawl has broken out between the mayor and a sheriff who runs the city jail, which has come under scrutiny for a video showing inmates using drugs, drinking beer, and handling a gun. Mayor Mitch Landrieu asked a judge last week to take the extraordinary step of placing the jail under federal oversight, effectively wresting control away from Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman. Landrieu is upset over an agreement Gusman reached with the U.S. Justice Department to reform the jail, saying the city, which funds the jail, can't afford the potential expense.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Nutter administration has won a significant concession on city pensions in an arbitration proceeding with the city's 2,000 prison guards. The neutral arbitrator in the case, Richard Kasher, ruled late last week that new hires in the bargaining unit may be forced to join a hybrid pension plan, created by the city to hold down costs. The hybrid plan provides a limited defined benefit for city employees, no more than 25 percent of the worker's final average salary, supplemented by an investment plan, similar to a 401(k)
NEWS
July 22, 2011
IT'S ALWAYS been folly to use the size of the prison population as a barometer for criminal activity, and District Attorney Seth Williams' efforts to reform the broken justice system over the past two years underscore that point. A new report from Pew's Philadelphia Research Initiative affirms that Williams' approach to sentencing and prosecuting has led to a decline in the city's jail population. A small drop in violent crime is a factor in that reduction but much more significant are the reforms to a system that seemed designed to drive as many people as possible into jail.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
For the second time in less than a month, a jailhouse incident has injected drama into the criminal cases of abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell and his wife, Pearl, accused along with eight former employees of running a filthy West Philadelphia clinic where a patient and seven newborns allegedly died at the doctor's hands. In the latest incident, city prosecutors used a subpoena instead of a warrant last week to have Pearl's jail cell searched - an illegal action, according to Michael Medway, the defendant's attorney.
NEWS
October 23, 2010 | By DANA DiFILIPPO
 AS A REPEAT offender with 13 arrests and three open gun cases, Kevin Turner was an inmate unlikely to live outside the bars and barbed wire of prison anytime soon. Still, he told a girlfriend earlier this month: "I'm getting out, and I'm getting out soon!" Within days of that promise, Turner sneaked out of a city jail and into his old life of crime. But his life on the lam was short-lived: He and an accomplice got into a shootout Thursday morning inside a Lawndale jewelry store they tried to rob. When the gunfire subsided, both Turner and William Glatz, the 67-year-old jeweler, were dead.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|