CollectionsCity Life
IN THE NEWS

City Life

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Try St. Joseph's University Gallery on the Lower Merion side of City Line Avenue near the new pedestrian bridge overpass. Blaise Tobia's photographs star there in his first solo show in our region. These pictures are mostly about our basic experiences of city life with its rational enough buildings and artifacts and its unreasonable emotions. Pictures based on emotionally loaded memories often have an oddly insistent intimacy that underscores their natural poignance. Tobia, who is in his sixth year teaching photography at Drexel University, travels back and forth between his Old City residence and his home in Brooklyn.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | By Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Used to be that any Philadelphian worth his pretzel salt wouldn't let nobody get away with nothin'. Not anymore. As more and more innocent bystanders are being used as target practice by thugs, drug fiends and crazies, the assertiveness that came with a Philadelphia ZIP Code is quickly wilting. Bravado and bluster are turning to blubber. Ask just about any native, from the Northeast to South Philadelphia, and they'll tell you their new life's motto: Proud to be a patsy. Much of this new caution stems from the growing sense that anyone can be attacked at any time for any reason.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
I've been living in the city for four years, so I've earned the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in urban living. I've had all the rites of passage: My apartment's been burglarized, I've had a regular flasher, I've braved the Whole Foods lines after work, I've gone to the beach by train, I've watched the fireworks from a rooftop, and I've eaten pizza standing in the street. They say you have to toughen up to live in a major city, and in a lot of ways, it's true. For every extra convenience, something else is a little harder.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2012 | By Laura Beitman Hoover, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even though Craig Rogerson spends 60 percent of his time traveling for work, he still enjoys coming home to Rittenhouse Square. He rides an elevator more than 20 floors, drops his keys in a bowl in the foyer, and looks through a wall-sized coral-reef aquarium across his living room to the city's skyline. "I like the views, the ways it's situated. It's really pretty at night," says Rogerson, 55, a Michigan native who has spent most of his life in the suburbs of Detroit, Atlanta and Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | Monica Yant Kinney
Joe McCool isn't exaggerating when he says his house is ground zero for the debate on whether city workers should be allowed to live wherever they want. McCool's place on Lukens Street sits firmly in Lower Southampton Township, Bucks County. But just over the fence out back and around the corner? Neighbors with Philadelphia addresses — cops, firefighters, prosecutors, judges, and Water Department employees who've chosen to reside at the absolute tip of Somerton because it's as close as they can get to suburbia.
NEWS
March 22, 1987
Anyone running for mayor should read this. I consider myself a Philadelphian-in-exile. I was born and raised in Philadelphia, and although I love the city very much I haven't lived in Philly for many years. Why? Because of the astronomical wage tax. Recently, I was considering a return to city life, but I decided not to. Instead of succumbing to the outrageous tax, I remain exiled in the outskirts. My current wage tax is $302 per annum as opposed to Philadelphia's $1,479. This was the sole basis of my decision.
NEWS
March 25, 2003 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
ANYONE WHO wants to understand Aristotle's "Politics" (and that's everyone who cares about living the good life) need only spend some time at the Palumbo Recreation Center. Aristotle offers a theory of human nature that few people believe anymore. He claims that people have a basic instinct to associate, creating cities in the process. Indeed, his famous summary definition of a human being is "the political animal. " The challenging part of Aristotle's argument is that the city creates the individual.
NEWS
November 29, 2004
Exactly who is this Kansas company that does yearly rankings on what cities are the most dangerous and the safest in the United States? I was appalled to wake up and see the ticker tape on "Good Morning America" and to read again in the Daily News (Nov. 22) that the very city where Walt Whitman's final resting place stands leads the nation as the most dangerous city. I really don't know what's going on concerning crime in Atlanta, St. Louis or Gary, Ind. Cities where large populations of minorities live need more than just survival surveys from an organization that probably hadn't visited them.
NEWS
January 25, 2005 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden residents are being urged to attend the city's first-ever summit on public safety tomorrow on the campus of Rutgers University. Representatives from city law enforcement and government, educators, and business and religious leaders are expected to attend, said Bill Shralow, spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. "We see this as an opportunity for the community - people from all different segments of city life - to define their roles in a comprehensive effort to fight crime in Camden," he said.
NEWS
October 5, 2000
If you've ever been kept awake RUFF! by a RUFF!RUFF! dog serenading the moon RUFF! RUFF! while you're trying to saw logs, you can understand how insanely annoyRUFF!RUFF! RUFF!RUFF!ing the steady yap of RUFF!RUFF!RUFF! barking can be. (Almost RUFF! as RUFF! annoying as RUFF!RUFF! reading this sentence.) So, two paws up for Councilman Jim Kenney's bill to curb dogs and other pets' ability to infringe on their human neighbors' peace and quality of life. The bill would extend current animal health and noise codes to include private property.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Flawed policies, social biases, and a lack of imagination are hurting Pennsylvania's cities, Gov. Wolf says. Urban residents pay more than they should for utilities, he believes. Infrastructure development follows sprawl. Racism has led to segregation of residents. And even advocates may privately consider cities "a tough bet. " "The truth is, if we actually had a level playing field, the cities would do quite well," Wolf said Tuesday. The governor, a Democrat who grew up in a small town but later became involved in urban issues, offered the glimpse into his view of the importance and treatment of urban areas during a conference hosted by Keystone Crossroads, a public media project exploring challenges facing Pennsylvania cities.
REAL_ESTATE
July 27, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For three decades, the views that Tom and Sue Carroll enjoyed year-round were of Victorian Cape May: sun, sea, sand, and tourists in spring, summer, and fall, and a far quieter scene in winter. As the owners of an inn, the Mainstay, the Carrolls were dedicated to pleasing others, and their lives were defined by dawn-to-dark responsibilities. As Sue explains, they were all about the inn's rhythms. In fact, her 1997 book is titled Breakfast at Nine, Tea at Four . The Carrolls opened the inn in 1971, then moved it to a nearby location in 1976, keeping the name intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You could choose to accept at face value the basic story line of The Rake's Progress - a Faustian fable, a tale of simpletons ending the opera by stepping out of character and singing the moral of the story directly at the audience. But in its spare, handsome sets by Amy Rubin and smartly underplayed direction of Jordan Fein, the Curtis Institute of Music production heard Sunday at the Prince Theater gave listeners every chance to decode connections between Stravinsky's acerbic score and one of the most artfully constructed librettos in the repertoire.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
OVER THE PAST 15 years in the U.S. Congress, I have been representing the citizens of the city of Philadelphia with pride and honor. I have been fortunate to see how our city has grown to respect and promote diversity. The LGBT community in our city has worked hard and been very lucky to have some great political leaders to ensure their acceptance and a place at the table. This recent gay bashing in downtown Philadelphia, in what I consider to be a hate crime, has no place in our fine City of Brotherly Love.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
CITY COUNCILMAN Jim Kenney has a clear message for federal authorities: Help Philly punish the people who savagely beat a gay couple. Kenney told his colleagues yesterday that he has asked the feds to investigate the alleged attack on Sept. 11 near Rittenhouse Square, because Pennsylvania's hate-crime law does not cover acts motivated by a victim's sexual orientation. He noted that the suspects in the case appear to be from the suburbs: Sources have told the Daily News that several "persons of interest" in the case are alumni of Archbishop Wood High School in Warminster, Bucks County.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
By the time the perfect night of cool August breezes (and no rain) ended, Saturday's sold-out Billy Joel show at Citizens Bank Park had made one thing evident: They don't write them like that anymore. This is not solely a discussion of Joel's melodic charms, his rocker's take on Brill Building/Tin Pan Alley/Broadway hooks, his stance as a modern Gershwin, with twists of the Beatles, Bob Gaudio, and Donald Fagen. What Joel provided to this mixed-age crowd was a life's soundtrack rich in urban, ethnic, specifically East Coast vibes and the kind of detailed character studies no songwriter does now, save within hip-hop.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
I've been living in the city for four years, so I've earned the equivalent of a bachelor's degree in urban living. I've had all the rites of passage: My apartment's been burglarized, I've had a regular flasher, I've braved the Whole Foods lines after work, I've gone to the beach by train, I've watched the fireworks from a rooftop, and I've eaten pizza standing in the street. They say you have to toughen up to live in a major city, and in a lot of ways, it's true. For every extra convenience, something else is a little harder.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
Charlie, fans deserved better It was obvious to even the most ardent Charlie Manuel fan that this would be his last year managing the Phillies. What was expected, and what he deserved, was a departure at the end of the season. Whatever rationale Ruben Amaro Jr. employed to arrive at the decision to give Ryne Sandberg an audition as interim manager, there was one thing he never considered: The fans deserved the opportunity to recognize Charlie for what he has meant to the city and the team.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY TINA SMITH-BROWN
IF YOU DO NOT live in the North Philadelphia/Northern Liberties section of the city, you've missed the invasion of the four-legged creatures that arrive daily - not in silver, shimmering flying saucers, but in squeaky-brake vans with markings like U-Haul or Mayflower tattooed on their sides. "We come in peace," these invaders message through the tips of wagging tags and playful paws, but as I scrape the bottom of my shoe on the edge of my sidewalk, I doubt the sincerity of their actions.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2012 | By Laura Beitman Hoover, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even though Craig Rogerson spends 60 percent of his time traveling for work, he still enjoys coming home to Rittenhouse Square. He rides an elevator more than 20 floors, drops his keys in a bowl in the foyer, and looks through a wall-sized coral-reef aquarium across his living room to the city's skyline. "I like the views, the ways it's situated. It's really pretty at night," says Rogerson, 55, a Michigan native who has spent most of his life in the suburbs of Detroit, Atlanta and Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|