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NEWS
September 28, 1998 | By Maureen Graham, Christine Bahls and Rita Giordano, FOR THE INQUIRER
The tiny borough of Pitman in Gloucester County is known for its peaceful, old-fashioned way of life. The school system is ranked as one of the best in New Jersey; its children are considered models of good behavior, with SAT scores substantially above the state average. In Pitman's quaint town center is an old stone bank with outdoor benches where for generations the townsfolk have stopped to chat. But in recent years, something else has been happening near the benches and the bank's clock.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / JON ADAMS
BATTLING THE ELEMENTS outside the Huntingdon Valley firehouse helped give this 57-ton National Guard tank that abandoned look. The tank was left there after it took part in the Lower Moreland Fourth of July parade. On Tuesday it was driven back to the city limits where Philadelphia police escorted it back to the armory on Ogontz Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2008
It's not quite up there with Jim Morrison's eternal resting place in Paris. No one leaves panties. But Frank L. Rizzo's gravesite, in Cheltenham's Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, still attracts anonymous payers of respect to the former mayor, who passed away in 1991. Rizzo's son, Councilman Frank Rizzo, drops by regularly, detouring for 10 or 20 minutes of quiet meditation when he's up that way on city business. He's often touched to find personal mementos that the Big Bambino's admirers have left behind.
NEWS
March 17, 2004 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two former Coatesville City Council members, a business group, and a firefighters union filed suit yesterday to invalidate three city charter amendments that voters approved last fall to stop the condemnation of land outside the city limits. The lawsuit filed in Chester County Court contends that the amendments - designed to prevent the city from building a public golf course on acreage owned by Dick and Nancy Saha in neighboring Valley Township - are vague, overreaching and unconstitutional.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A Pennsylvania Department of Transportation offer to give Coatesville 1.2 miles of state roads has received a lukewarm response from the City Council. Some council members said they feared the extra mileage would result in hiring more road crew members to plow snow and would mean spending more on salt and cinders. "Today it may look good," said Councilman Mark Milanese, "but we all know that these streets have been extreme maintenance problems over the years. " He said the deal would be "penny-wise and dollar-foolish, because eventually we're going to have to reconstruct those streets.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York's mayor served notice Friday that his police department would do everything in its power to root out terrorists in the United States, even if that means sending officers outside the city limits or placing law-abiding Muslims under scrutiny. "We just cannot let our guard down again," Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned. He laid out his doctrine for keeping the city safe during his weekly radio show after a week of criticism of a secret New York Police Department effort to monitor mosques in several cities and keep files on Muslim student groups at colleges in Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Upstate New York.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
After enduring a nearly dry funk inside the city limits, the microbrewery trend has suddenly bubbled back into Philadelphia with revitalized fizz. The Princeton-based Triumph Brewing Co. was the first of two to open this year (West Philly's Dock Street is the most recent), and its handsome industrial-chic space in Old City is completely redolent of the sweet, malty aroma of brewing beer. The brews aren't just fresh, they're extremely well made by brewer Patrick Jones, who delivers balanced and expressive renditions of both brewhouse standards (hoppy IPA, creamy stout, and a likable amber ale)
NEWS
April 26, 2004
IN THE PAST, I've been a bit critical of Philadelphia and the Commonwealth. So, in a positive vein, here are a few solutions to the problems that the city and region have: 1. Philadelphia, her suburbs and regional communities have to come together for common causes like shared low taxes, a unified school district like L.A.'s, expanded city limits (in eastern Delaware County, lower Montgomery County, southern Bucks County). 2. Lower the fares and cut administrative jobs or pay at SEPTA.
NEWS
April 21, 1986
As a Philadelphian, I feel the legislature did us a great favor by denying again a measure to implement construction of a new convention center. Except for a few self-interest groups, this project has never generated broad-based support in our community, but the field is now open for private developers with private capital to move ahead in the Market Street East area. I also feel the following actions are imperative at this time in order to restore Philadelphia's reputation as a convention city: Dress up the Civic Center and its staff.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Kit Konolige, Daily News Staff Writer
A third rabid raccoon has been found in Philadelphia, city health officials announced yesterday, as they renewed their warnings against the fatal but preventable disease. The three rabid raccoons found this year are the first within the city limits in 40 years, the result of a rabies epidemic centered in Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. In addition to the direct danger of infection from wild animals - which officials warned should never be handled - rabies can be caught from bites or scratches from household pets that have been infected by wild animals.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 10 years of paying five employees, plus additional "associates," to staff his Old City business, James R. Domenick is looking for space in the suburbs, and thinking about moving out. It's about taxes, and the pressure the city has felt compelled to exert on small businesses such as Domenick's insurance office to raise money for its cash-strapped public schools. "I am not an antitax person," Domenick told me. "I believe people need to pay for the infrastructure and the services they receive.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council's special committee on demolition practices tried to focus Thursday on cooperation among city agencies, but its chairman expressed "frustration" with what he called limited cooperation from the Nutter administration. Among 10 departments the committee wanted to hear from, only four were permitted to appear. One of the no-shows was the Department of Licenses and Inspections, the lead agency granting permits to take down buildings in the city. "This is a point of frustration but not a point that will deter us from accomplishing the best possible safety methods" for demolitions, said the chairman, Curtis Jones Jr. Privately, Jones said, the administration attributed its reticence to a grand jury investigation into the June 5 building collapse at 22d and Market Streets that killed six people and wounded 13 more.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Throughout his 2007 campaign and five-plus years as mayor, Michael Nutter has promoted the virtues of government transparency and open records. At a U.S. Conference of Mayors event in Philadelphia last month, described as an "innovation summit," Nutter patted himself on the back for releasing 47 data sets covering everything from crime to property values. But in the last year, the administration has created new procedural and legal hurdles, with attendant delays, for people seeking access to city records.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
WHAT FURTHER proof do we need that the inmates are running the asylum? Mayor Nutter's people tell us that the city isn't responsible for the work done by contractors on private property. Well then, exactly who is responsible? You? Me? It's my impression that L&I exists to do exactly that, oversee construction and/or demolition. If that's not true, then what exactly do they do? Deny, deny, deny. The Sergeant Schultz ("Hogan's Heroes") defense: I see nothing, I know nothing. I might be crazy, but I think the city leaders are ultimately responsible for everything that happens inside the city limits, just as a ship's captain or an airplane pilot is responsible for everything that's happening aboard.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Good Hands People say Philly has lots of Bad Steering People. Again. In the annual All-State Insurance study of accident claims filed in 195 American cities, the City of Bumperly Shove had the highest crash rate among cities with 1 million residents. Yo, no surprise! After all, Roosevelt Boulevard alone has two of the nation's five most crash-prone intersections, at Red Lion Road (No. 2) and Grant Avenue (No. 5), a State Farm study once revealed. Besides, Philly was bottom among big cities in all seven previous examinations - and some of the others hardly ever see ice and snow.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York's mayor served notice Friday that his police department would do everything in its power to root out terrorists in the United States, even if that means sending officers outside the city limits or placing law-abiding Muslims under scrutiny. "We just cannot let our guard down again," Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned. He laid out his doctrine for keeping the city safe during his weekly radio show after a week of criticism of a secret New York Police Department effort to monitor mosques in several cities and keep files on Muslim student groups at colleges in Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Upstate New York.
SPORTS
December 19, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Days later, some people are still trying to make sense of it. Cliff Lee is back in Philly. It wasn't some form of cruel, Bud Selig- imposed punishment. Lee chose this course and seemed happy to do so. That remains a tough thing for out-of-towners and the national media to accept. To hear outsiders tell it, this isn't a place anyone should choose over New York (or any other place, for that matter), and certainly not for less money. It's a city you're supposed to run away from, not toward.
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Philly is just fine for a day trip, but not necessarily as a place to live, according to a new poll of area suburbanites. The survey of 801 residents from the seven counties surrounding the city limits was conducted by the Pew Charitable Trust's Philadelphia Research Initiative. According to the poll, 81 percent said that the city was a great place to visit for a variety of cultural or sporting events. "People love it as a place to visit, there's no question about that," said Larry Eichel, project director of the Philadelphia Research Initiative.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
MAYOR Nutter's recent op-ed piece, "Philly's Science Boost," rightfully takes great pride in the achievements of Philadelphia's research community. But it also inadvertently reveals a missing element in the city's economic-development strategy. The fact is, research activity is responsible for hiring relatively few people, and most of those are at the highest level of academic accomplishment. It matters little to most Philadelphians whether a product is discovered here or not, eventually they will have the benefits of it, whatever it is. On the other hand, if a product discovered here is also manufactured here, that could matter a great deal to Philadelphians.
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