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NEWS
April 18, 1996 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Stu Bykofsky contributed to this report
The 15-year-old City Paper, an irreverent weekly that distributes 95,000 free copies, has been sold to Montgomery Newspapers Inc., for about $4 million. Bruce Schimmel, who founded the City Paper with a $15,000 stake in 1981, will leave his job as editor and publisher and join Montgomery Newspapers as a consultant, said Arthur W. Howe, Montgomery Newspapers' president and publisher. "This newspaper made me a millionaire before I sold it," said Schimmel, 43. "Success is sweet, but it really gets kind of boring.
LIVING
February 18, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Paper, the free weekly paper, said it would publish an article tomorrow conceding that a backstage interview with the star and director of the New York show Freak did not take place as presented. In last week's issue, freelance writer Jim Gladstone wrote that he had met with actor John Leguizamo and Freak's writer-director, David Bar Katz, at the Cort Theatre in Manhattan after a preview performance. Leguizamo was not present, said news editor Howard Altman. His quotes were taken from a published work and patched into dialogue with Katz, Altman said.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
Run your eyes around Bruce Schimmel's corner office in the Chancellor Building on S. 13th Street, command center for the 39-year-old co-founder, editor and sole owner of the City Paper, and a new style of interior design comes to mind - Alternative Citizen Kane. The old Royal typewriter on the windowsill glares down at the Macintosh on his desk, a kind of journalistic conscience. A worn photo of the Center City weekly's boss, shaking hands with Mayor Goode, shares wall space with atmosphere items: an anti-Reagan cartoon and a Peace calendar.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The owners of a Fairmount nightspot yesterday sued the City Paper and one of its sources, charging that the newspaper defamed the club two years ago by publishing allegations it was racist because of a bartender's remark to two black customers. In the suit, filen in Montgomery County Court, Peter Kelly and Charles Abdo, president and secretary/treasurer of the corporation that owns the North Star Bar, 2639 W. Popar St., seek more than $50,000 in compensatory and punitive damages.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Contending he was libeled, State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo has sued the publisher of the City Paper and one of its editors, Howard Altman, over a recent column about Fumo's role on the Board of City Trusts. Fumo's lawsuit objected to Altman's use of language in the Nov. 14-20 issue of the City Paper describing the board as a "goon squad" that is "controlled by" the senator. The suit also cites Altman's characterization of the board's Stephen Girard College Trust as Fumo's "$230 million toy chest," which he uses "as private monopoly money with no accountability to anyone.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1996 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The City Paper, a Philadelphia alternative weekly started with $15,000 in 1981, is set to be sold today for about $4 million to Montgomery Newspapers, which publishes a chain of suburban weekly newspapers. The City Paper would become the 22d publication of Montgomery Newspapers, a Fort Washington company that publishes 15 community weekly newspapers such as the Ambler Gazette and Main Line Life, along with a half-dozen specialty publications such as Art Matters and Philadelphia Golfer.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
HE WAS basically a West Philly kid who never really forgot the life of the corners and the playgrounds and the camaraderie of the streets. But Steve Fredericks rose from that environment to become one of Philadelphia's best- known sportscasters, who raised sports broadcasting above the ordinary with his wry humor and his erudition. "Live," he'd open his "Sports Line" show, "from the palatial, but not overly ostentatious, studios of WCAU Radio . . . " "That's not normal sports language," said Bob Gelb, Steve's producer at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
DEESHA DYER has come a long way from her days of handing out free condoms at Fluid and other local nightclubs. These days, instead of trying to persuade partygoers to get themselves tested for HIV, she's in charge of all of the social functions at the White House. Yeah, you read that right. The White House as in 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. As the new White House social secretary, her job is to work closely with first lady Michelle Obama to compile guest lists for opulent dinners honoring visiting dignitaries such as Chinese President Xi Jinping, who's coming in September.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Philadelphia's Democratic machine has supported candidates who have been recorded taking unreported cash from a lobbyist, pleaded guilty to fixing traffic tickets for crab cakes, and faced charges of using state workers to raise campaign funds. But City Commissioners Chairman Anthony Clark, a Democratic ward leader and Philadelphia's top elections official, has come up with a new way to show the party's disregard for the democratic process: He doesn't vote. Clark hasn't voted since the general election in 2011, City Paper reported recently, citing voting records maintained by Clark's own office.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THIRTEEN-YEAR-OLD Little League sensation  Mo'ne Davis took the high road yesterday by publicly forgiving a young man who insulted her on the Internet. Joey Casselberry , a/k/a @Big Cass24, is no longer on Twitter, but posted last week: "Disney is making a movie about Mo'ne Davis? WHAT A JOKE. That slut got rocked by Nevada. " Casselberry, a junior and first baseman for the Bloomsburg University Huskies, was bounced from the team over the weekend after college president David L. Soltz said he was "deeply saddened" by the offensive tweet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
DEESHA DYER has come a long way from her days of handing out free condoms at Fluid and other local nightclubs. These days, instead of trying to persuade partygoers to get themselves tested for HIV, she's in charge of all of the social functions at the White House. Yeah, you read that right. The White House as in 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. As the new White House social secretary, her job is to work closely with first lady Michelle Obama to compile guest lists for opulent dinners honoring visiting dignitaries such as Chinese President Xi Jinping, who's coming in September.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THREE PHILADELPHIA police officers are expected to be arrested today over unrelated incidents, a law-enforcement source told the Daily News last night. One of the cops, Officer Christopher Hulmes, is expected to be charged with perjury, the source said. Philadelphia's City Paper reported last summer that Hulmes had lied in court and on a search-warrant affidavit tied to a 2010 drug case - and that the District Attorney's Office dragged its feet on turning over evidence of Hulmes' misconduct to defense attorneys.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THIRTEEN-YEAR-OLD Little League sensation  Mo'ne Davis took the high road yesterday by publicly forgiving a young man who insulted her on the Internet. Joey Casselberry , a/k/a @Big Cass24, is no longer on Twitter, but posted last week: "Disney is making a movie about Mo'ne Davis? WHAT A JOKE. That slut got rocked by Nevada. " Casselberry, a junior and first baseman for the Bloomsburg University Huskies, was bounced from the team over the weekend after college president David L. Soltz said he was "deeply saddened" by the offensive tweet.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Much about restaurants is a matter of taste, but we can all agree on minimizing the involvement of rodents and bacteria. Fortunately, a cadre of city food-safety inspectors stands between Philadelphia's diners and its noroviruses. Unfortunately, their work is about as difficult to trace as a case of food poisoning. It's not just that the city's restaurant inspection reports are tucked away in an obscure corner of the Web , but also that any layman who takes the trouble to find them will be hard-pressed to understand their meaning and import.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Philadelphia's Democratic machine has supported candidates who have been recorded taking unreported cash from a lobbyist, pleaded guilty to fixing traffic tickets for crab cakes, and faced charges of using state workers to raise campaign funds. But City Commissioners Chairman Anthony Clark, a Democratic ward leader and Philadelphia's top elections official, has come up with a new way to show the party's disregard for the democratic process: He doesn't vote. Clark hasn't voted since the general election in 2011, City Paper reported recently, citing voting records maintained by Clark's own office.
NEWS
October 14, 2014
DID YOU HEAR the one about the guy whose job is to oversee elections in Philadelphia but never bothers to show up to vote? Sorry to say it is not a joke. As the City Paper reported recently, Anthony Clark, chair of the City Commissioners, hasn't voted in the past five elections. The three commissioners run the city's Election Bureau. Part of their job is to promote registration and encourage people to vote. Yet, Clark hasn't voted since 2011. Maybe he could argue that he is too busy on Election Day to take time to vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
    "IF YOU have a character who is smelling and tasting green onions and also has a hand on their bottom, your audience understands them better," said Diana Gabaldon , the mega-best-selling author of the Outlander series. Gabaldon was explaining why she needed to travel to Philadelphia in order to write the most recent entry in the series, Written in My Own Heart's Blood , which takes place during the Revolutionary War. If she imbues her characters with more sensory details - from bad breath to some backside-related flirting - her faraway characters become real for her readers, who have gobbled up 17 million copies of her books in print.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
CBS3's Pat Ciarrocchi and 6ABC's Jim Gardner have been inducted into the Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. They join KYW's Malcolm Poindexter and Larry Kane as the only other broadcast-news anchors in the hall. Ciarrocchi, who celebrated her 32nd year behind the anchor desk at CBS3, has the distinction of being the first female anchor inducted. The Chester County native, who grew up watching Mort Crim , Vince Leonard and Jessica Savitch , joined the station on March 15, 1982, and credits her longevity to a genuine love of the community and desire to tell its story.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Patrick Kerkstra
Gov. Corbett has belatedly realized what's been obvious for years: The state's utterly inadequate funding of K-12 education is a massive political liability for him, one that could well sink his reelection. The attention is welcome, even if the deal he is cooking up to bail out the city's schools is an atrocious one for Philadelphia taxpayers. Corbett's epiphany that education matters was likely helped along by two new polls commissioned by organizations frantic to ensure that Philadelphia's public schools open in the fall with something more than a skeleton crew of teachers and a principal.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE HUSBAND of City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown - who admitted earlier this year to a series of campaign-finance violations - was laid off last week from his job at the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for budgetary reasons, officials say. But a source familiar with the decision said information that surfaced about Howard Brown certainly didn't help. In March the City Paper reported that Brown, 57, who worked with PRA for 10 years as an assistant director of administration, was $4,200 behind in taxes.
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