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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The weekly City Paper's scoop on the cleanup, fix-up, paint-up job on state Sen. Vincent Fumo's Victorian mansion in Fairmount may prove as slippery as a freshly waxed hardwood floor. Fumo is seeking to hold the giveaway newspaper in contempt of court for obtaining off-limits city records detailing renovation work on the 19th century mansion on Green Street. Common Pleas Judge Albert W. Sheppard, who ordered the building permits sealed last year, has not ruled on the contempt charge.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE HUSBAND of City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown - who admitted earlier this year to a series of campaign-finance violations - was laid off last week from his job at the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for budgetary reasons, officials say. But a source familiar with the decision said information that surfaced about Howard Brown certainly didn't help. In March the City Paper reported that Brown, 57, who worked with PRA for 10 years as an assistant director of administration, was $4,200 behind in taxes.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ads for the movie are bad enough, they said. Big yellow signs on billboards and bus shelters that read, Warning: Crazy People Are Coming. Then, the weekly City Paper ran a promotion in Thursday's edition, offering free tickets to a screening of the movie. In order to win, readers were asked to come to the newspaper office yesterday and "prove to us you're crazy. " "I brought my medication and said, 'I'm crazy,' " recounted Laura Van Tosh, angrily shaking a bottle of pills drawn from her purse.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
    "IF YOU have a character who is smelling and tasting green onions and also has a hand on their bottom, your audience understands them better," said Diana Gabaldon , the mega-best-selling author of the Outlander series. Gabaldon was explaining why she needed to travel to Philadelphia in order to write the most recent entry in the series, Written in My Own Heart's Blood , which takes place during the Revolutionary War. If she imbues her characters with more sensory details - from bad breath to some backside-related flirting - her faraway characters become real for her readers, who have gobbled up 17 million copies of her books in print.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Philadelphia's Democratic machine has supported candidates who have been recorded taking unreported cash from a lobbyist, pleaded guilty to fixing traffic tickets for crab cakes, and faced charges of using state workers to raise campaign funds. But City Commissioners Chairman Anthony Clark, a Democratic ward leader and Philadelphia's top elections official, has come up with a new way to show the party's disregard for the democratic process: He doesn't vote. Clark hasn't voted since the general election in 2011, City Paper reported recently, citing voting records maintained by Clark's own office.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly 50 years ago, Leon Levin dreamed of creating a Pittsburgh magazine for travelers, something they would find in their hotel rooms, spotlighting local restaurants and goings-on. That magazine never got off the ground. But in 1971, Levin started a weekly newspaper in Philadelphia and he gave it the name he'd hoped to give the travel magazine: The Welcomat. The name was an awkward fit. For 24 years the paper wore it uncomfortably. But that era ended yesterday. With today's issue, the Welcomat has traded in its quirky name to become Philadelphia Weekly, a less original but more accurate name designed to put it in the tradition of alternative city newspapers.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
CBS3's Pat Ciarrocchi and 6ABC's Jim Gardner have been inducted into the Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. They join KYW's Malcolm Poindexter and Larry Kane as the only other broadcast-news anchors in the hall. Ciarrocchi, who celebrated her 32nd year behind the anchor desk at CBS3, has the distinction of being the first female anchor inducted. The Chester County native, who grew up watching Mort Crim , Vince Leonard and Jessica Savitch , joined the station on March 15, 1982, and credits her longevity to a genuine love of the community and desire to tell its story.
SPORTS
February 24, 2002 | By Gary Miles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you want it sugar-coated, if you want it politically correct, if you want to hear it only the way you want to hear it, don't ask Christa Zaro. "Hey, I'm Italian and from Norristown," Zaro said. "That's the way I am. " And Zaro is that way smack in the center of Salt Lake City. "It's so relaxing here," Zaro said. "It's so easy. It's those mountains that are all around us. You can't get away from them. After these mountains, I could never go back to the Poconos. " So what's a nice Catholic woman, a graduate of Mount St. Joseph Academy no less, doing a stone's throw away from the Mormon Temple?
BUSINESS
February 8, 1996 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's ba-a-a-a-ck. Philadelphia journalist Dan Rottenberg, who created the freewheeling format of the Welcomat, a weekly Philadelphia newspaper, has returned as editor of a new Center City newspaper that debuts today and is modeled in part after the Welcomat. Fifty thousand copies of the newspaper, called the Philadelphia Forum, will be distributed free to Center City homes, stores and offices. The start-up becomes the third major Center City alternative weekly, after the City Paper and the Philadelphia Weekly, which changed its name from the Welcomat last year.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | by Victor Chen, Daily News Staff Writer
When Vance Lehmkuhl moved to Upper Darby from Florida in 1985, he expected a quiet life. Not quite. "I moved up there just in time to be in the barricade for the MOVE confrontation just across the (Cobbs) Creek," he said. It was not a happy time. When houses started burning on Osage Avenue, Lehmkuhl and his wife contemplated grabbing the stereo (it was not a prosperous time, either) and driving west. The award-winning City Paper editorial cartoonist (and, now, Roxborough resident)
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