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NEWS
August 14, 1996 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The story in the Philadelphia Weekly about the long-ago love affair between the burly baseball slugger and the baby-voiced actress was sweet and sentimental. It also was a fake. The July 3 cover story featured supposedly long-lost love letters between Philadelphia baseball star Jimmie Foxx and actress Judy Holliday, written in the summer of '45. The newspaper's editor, Tim Whitaker, said yesterday that the story and letters were invented by freelance writer Tom McGrath.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Who knew a cat and dog, natural enemies, could make such a purr-fect combination. Saturday at the Cruise Terminal of the Philadelphia Naval Business Center, Cozmic Cat - named Philly's best DJ by City Paper and Philadelphia Magazine in 2000 - will captain all on a journey through her trip-hop and acid-jazz at the Hair O' the Dog gala. In its eighth year, this go-around of Hair O' the Dog will benefit an as-yet-unspecified rescue organization and also the Bethesda Project, whose mission is to house and educate the homeless.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2005 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
There will be plans of attack and there will be casualties, but there's a difference in this war: The weapon of choice is a laptop. The Philadelphia Laptop Battle 4 at Silk City on Wednesday will be a "mix of DJ battle and battle of the bands," according to Gair Marking of Seclusiasis, which is presenting the contest. The setup is three rounds, in which all contestants will participate. Judging will be based on how live the performance is - "We want some interaction between [participants]
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE HUSBAND of City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown - who admitted earlier this year to a series of campaign-finance violations - was laid off last week from his job at the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for budgetary reasons, officials say. But a source familiar with the decision said information that surfaced about Howard Brown certainly didn't help. In March the City Paper reported that Brown, 57, who worked with PRA for 10 years as an assistant director of administration, was $4,200 behind in taxes.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Lynne O'Dwyer, Special to The Inquirer
Marian H. Dominguez Smyth, 64, a former reporter for the Philadelphia Bulletin and other area newspapers, died of a heart attack Tuesday at her home in Erma, Cape May County. Born in Philadelphia, Mrs. Smyth attended Frankford High School and spent much of her childhood in Cheltenham Township. She served as a Republican committeewoman in Upper Moreland Township, Montgomery County, during the early 1960s. Mrs. Smyth got her first opportunity as a writer at Progress Newspapers, when she approached the publication in Hatboro in hopes of getting coverage for a new faction of the area's Republican Party.
NEWS
June 22, 2005 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As of Monday, Mayor Street will get a new chief spokesperson - his fourth since the start of his second term 18 months ago. Street's current acting communications director, Deborah Bolling, was replaced yesterday, eight months after she first joined the mayor's communications office in a lesser role. A terse statement from chief of staff Joyce Wilkerson stated that Bolling would be succeeded by Joe Grace, who for the last year has served as the administration's go-between with City Council.
NEWS
November 9, 2002 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tall and lanky Tyrus Bush, 17, began to sing Eric Clapton's "Change the World" accompanied by karaoke rhythms, and as he crooned the first line - If I could reach the sta-ars - he pulled from his sleeve a sizable silver star and slowly waved it in front of the five judges. "You gave us showmanship!" said singer-songwriter Lauren Hart after the performance. "It felt good; it felt right!" said Boyz II Men singer Nate Morris. Sound, performance, feeling. The five judges seeking 10 finalists in the Philadelphia Idol contest spent all day yesterday considering those qualities.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2003 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
When the City Paper ran a "Where Are They Now?" piece about the Low Road in late 2002, Mike Brenner received a flood of e-mails from old fans clamoring for a reunion of the band, which disbanded in 1997. That, coupled with harmonica player Palmer Yale's return to Philadelphia from San Francisco, led the band to book Tuesday's and Wednesday's shows at the Tin Angel. Soon after forming in 1990, the Low Road became one of the city's most popular bands. "The groundswell of support in Philadelphia in our first two or three years was kind of overwhelming," says Brenner, just back from a series of gigs in London with Marah.
NEWS
September 22, 2003
RE THE Sept. 15 letter from Kendall Wood: At what point did Sam Katz become a racist? Did his campaign throw an un-lit Molotov cocktail through one of Mayor Street's campaign offices? At what point did "Mayor Katz" say, "the white people are runnin' the city"? At what point did Sam Katz have city employees working on his campaign? The answer to every one of these questions is "never. " The reason the recent covers of the Daily News regarding Mayor Street are consistently negative is because of the facts, not the color of his skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
A musical city with a tough audience, that's Philadelphia. Ask any entertainer who has spent time here. "Philly is the hardest audience in the world to please," the multitalented Rich Medina says, but "that makes it great for building your craft. " The City of Brotherly Love obviously has had a positive effect on the DJ-producer-poet, one of the artists featured this weekend in the conclusion of the four-day Philadelity, the mostly local music festival that celebrates stylistic diversity.
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