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NEWS
January 7, 2012
Did Philadelphia seem back on track this week? Did the tap water taste better and the brotherly love seem brotherlier? Then it must have been because City Councilwoman Marian Tasco at long last emerged from retirement, mercifully ending the chaos that had set in while we were deprived of her leadership. Before Tasco returned to her position high atop the payroll, the city had endured some bleak, dystopian days - two of them, to be precise. But now our short municipal nightmare is over.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The editorial staff of La Salle University's weekly newspaper, the Collegian, spent Wednesday evening plotting a mildly subversive act. For more than a week, they had been negotiating with officials at the private Catholic university over a potentially embarrassing article about a business management professor. Vinny Vella had the story first. (Click here to read the Collegian's story and here to read an editorial about the the Collegian staff's relationship with administration.)
NEWS
August 5, 2010
It's good to see Mayor Nutter move to end the DROP program. Too bad it took a decade and yet another study, this one costing $80,000, to determine the city can't afford this pension perk. City Council should follow the mayor's lead and approve his legislation to end the so-called Deferred Retirement Option Plan. Any measure that is passed, though, will likely grandfather in the six Council members signed up to receive DROP payments next year ranging from $200,000 to almost $600,000.
NEWS
May 19, 2010
MAYOR Nutter basically said to heck with taxpayers: "$17 million more in cuts - but that's all. " Well, that's not good enough, Mr. Mayor! Surely there are further cuts that can be made without compromising public safety, but does the mayor have the stomach for them? How many millions of tax dollars are wasted every year? Look no further than the city's broken pension system (Deferred Retirement Option Plan in particular) to find a significant cause of our financial woes. Just a few weeks ago, the City Paper did a story on DROP, calling it a "Billion $ Boondoggle.
NEWS
April 27, 2010
It is bad enough that a handful of elected city officials have abused the pension perk known as DROP. But now there is more compelling evidence of an even bigger drain the plan is having on Philadelphia's already wobbly pension system. A lengthy story in the City Paper last week detailed a number of red flags regarding DROP, short for Deferred Retirement Option Plan. The plan has cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars and provided little to nothing in return. The firm that helped the city establish DROP has run into legal trouble in other cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2009 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
TWO DOORS lead off Jackson Street into a large South Philly warehouse. One door leads the visitor to descend into the domain of the long-running Fright Factory attraction; through the other, one wanders into a maze of eerie rooms that at first glance wouldn't seem out of place downstairs. "Bad things happen here; the biggest magic trick of the night happens in here. " Director Madi Distefano ticks off the litany of scares yet to come as she power walks through the still-under-construction labyrinth that will scare and entertain audiences as "Haunted Poe. " "Dark hall, spooky sounds, things on the wall, live cockroaches, scary things and surprises . . . " Most of those are essentials to any haunted house (though even the most intense probably wouldn't want to muck about with live cockroaches - which, rest assured, will be safely ensconced behind glass)
SPORTS
October 31, 2008
From: Sheridan, Phil So I'm leaving the ballpark last night about 12:30 or so and I get into a line of cars turning northbound onto Broad Street. There were people high-fiving and just wandering around looking stunned. I saw this one young guy tapping on windows of cars and I figured, as I pulled up, that he was just communing with everyone. Instead, he was trying to get a ride for himself and his two friends. Here, the three of them were part of a group of Temple students who sprinted out into the night after Lidge struck out Hinske and just kept going.
NEWS
July 8, 2007
Last month, the Great Expectations civic dialogue project, a joint effort of the University of Pennsylvania and The Inquirer, asked citizens of the region to imagine that the next mayor of Philadelphia was sitting at their kitchen table. How would they complete this sentence, "Yo, Mike (or Al), what I really need you to do is. ... " More than 600 essays were received. They can be viewed at the project Web site, www.greatexpectations07.com. The major-party nominees for mayor, Democrat Michael Nutter and Republican Al Taubenberger, have agreed to respond to some citizen essays in print.
NEWS
March 14, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and 10 other Knight Ridder Inc. papers are back on the auction block, with a Colorado media mogul, a national journalists' union, and some hometown hopefuls among the potential bidders. Other bidders could yet emerge after McClatchy Co., of Sacramento, Calif., said it would break up the 32-paper Knight Ridder chain that it agreed on Sunday to buy for $67.25 a share, or $4.5 billion in cash and stock plus $2.0 billion in assumed debt. Newspaper officials and analysts cautioned that months of negotiation and uncertainty could lie ahead for readers and employees of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., the Knight Ridder subsidiary that publishes the region's dominant newspapers, the philly.
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