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NEWS
April 27, 2010
It is bad enough that a handful of elected city officials have abused the pension perk known as DROP. But now there is more compelling evidence of an even bigger drain the plan is having on Philadelphia's already wobbly pension system. A lengthy story in the City Paper last week detailed a number of red flags regarding DROP, short for Deferred Retirement Option Plan. The plan has cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars and provided little to nothing in return. The firm that helped the city establish DROP has run into legal trouble in other cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2009 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
TWO DOORS lead off Jackson Street into a large South Philly warehouse. One door leads the visitor to descend into the domain of the long-running Fright Factory attraction; through the other, one wanders into a maze of eerie rooms that at first glance wouldn't seem out of place downstairs. "Bad things happen here; the biggest magic trick of the night happens in here. " Director Madi Distefano ticks off the litany of scares yet to come as she power walks through the still-under-construction labyrinth that will scare and entertain audiences as "Haunted Poe. " "Dark hall, spooky sounds, things on the wall, live cockroaches, scary things and surprises . . . " Most of those are essentials to any haunted house (though even the most intense probably wouldn't want to muck about with live cockroaches - which, rest assured, will be safely ensconced behind glass)
SPORTS
October 31, 2008
From: Sheridan, Phil So I'm leaving the ballpark last night about 12:30 or so and I get into a line of cars turning northbound onto Broad Street. There were people high-fiving and just wandering around looking stunned. I saw this one young guy tapping on windows of cars and I figured, as I pulled up, that he was just communing with everyone. Instead, he was trying to get a ride for himself and his two friends. Here, the three of them were part of a group of Temple students who sprinted out into the night after Lidge struck out Hinske and just kept going.
NEWS
July 8, 2007
Last month, the Great Expectations civic dialogue project, a joint effort of the University of Pennsylvania and The Inquirer, asked citizens of the region to imagine that the next mayor of Philadelphia was sitting at their kitchen table. How would they complete this sentence, "Yo, Mike (or Al), what I really need you to do is. ... " More than 600 essays were received. They can be viewed at the project Web site, www.greatexpectations07.com. The major-party nominees for mayor, Democrat Michael Nutter and Republican Al Taubenberger, have agreed to respond to some citizen essays in print.
NEWS
March 14, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and 10 other Knight Ridder Inc. papers are back on the auction block, with a Colorado media mogul, a national journalists' union, and some hometown hopefuls among the potential bidders. Other bidders could yet emerge after McClatchy Co., of Sacramento, Calif., said it would break up the 32-paper Knight Ridder chain that it agreed on Sunday to buy for $67.25 a share, or $4.5 billion in cash and stock plus $2.0 billion in assumed debt. Newspaper officials and analysts cautioned that months of negotiation and uncertainty could lie ahead for readers and employees of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., the Knight Ridder subsidiary that publishes the region's dominant newspapers, the philly.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | Rebecca Rimel is president and CEO of the Pew Charitable Trusts Donald Kimelman is the Trusts' director of information and civic initiatives
This week, the celebration of the 300th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's birth begins in earnest with the opening of a new international exhibition on Franklin's long and storied life at the National Constitution Center. For all his accomplishments, Franklin was first, and perhaps foremost, a newspaperman, publisher of the lively and successful Pennsylvania Gazette. It is bittersweet that such a celebration comes at a time of some peril for his latter-day heirs in Philadelphia, the people who write and publish The Inquirer and its sister publication, the Philadelphia Daily News.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2005 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
There will be plans of attack and there will be casualties, but there's a difference in this war: The weapon of choice is a laptop. The Philadelphia Laptop Battle 4 at Silk City on Wednesday will be a "mix of DJ battle and battle of the bands," according to Gair Marking of Seclusiasis, which is presenting the contest. The setup is three rounds, in which all contestants will participate. Judging will be based on how live the performance is - "We want some interaction between [participants]
NEWS
June 22, 2005 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As of Monday, Mayor Street will get a new chief spokesperson - his fourth since the start of his second term 18 months ago. Street's current acting communications director, Deborah Bolling, was replaced yesterday, eight months after she first joined the mayor's communications office in a lesser role. A terse statement from chief of staff Joyce Wilkerson stated that Bolling would be succeeded by Joe Grace, who for the last year has served as the administration's go-between with City Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
Electro-folk collective the Wayward Wind, which scored Headlong Dance Theater's "Hotel Pool" at last year's Live Arts Festival, is throwing a record release party for "Wait For Green. " Joining the band are She-Haw's Amy Pickard, the Twin Atlas and Ultramush (9:30 tonight, Indre Studios, 1418 S. Darien St., 215-463-3000, $10 includes CD, www.schwa-disk.com). The unique styles of DiPinto Guitars have fans in David Bowie, Rick Nielsen, Dick Dale and Jack White. The husband-and-wife-owned shop reopens in its new Fishtown location with festivities from local endorsees Ken, the Jukebox Zeros, Jamaldeen Tacuma, the Sparklers and others (3 to 7 p.m. tomorrow, 407-409 Girard Ave., 215-427-7805, free, www.dipintoguitars.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2003 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
When the City Paper ran a "Where Are They Now?" piece about the Low Road in late 2002, Mike Brenner received a flood of e-mails from old fans clamoring for a reunion of the band, which disbanded in 1997. That, coupled with harmonica player Palmer Yale's return to Philadelphia from San Francisco, led the band to book Tuesday's and Wednesday's shows at the Tin Angel. Soon after forming in 1990, the Low Road became one of the city's most popular bands. "The groundswell of support in Philadelphia in our first two or three years was kind of overwhelming," says Brenner, just back from a series of gigs in London with Marah.
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