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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
A musical city with a tough audience, that's Philadelphia. Ask any entertainer who has spent time here. "Philly is the hardest audience in the world to please," the multitalented Rich Medina says, but "that makes it great for building your craft. " The City of Brotherly Love obviously has had a positive effect on the DJ-producer-poet, one of the artists featured this weekend in the conclusion of the four-day Philadelity, the mostly local music festival that celebrates stylistic diversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelity philosophy is built upon a simple belief. "If you ask people what kind of music they like," says Bryan Dilworth, "they say, 'All kinds.' " Along with File 13 Records honcho Matt Werth, Dilworth is the principal organizer of Philadelity, the mostly local music festival whose second edition will take place at clubs around town starting Wednesday. Dilworth, the band-booker responsible for placing acts in the Khyber, Theatre of Living Arts, the Five Spot, and the swank Mount Airy club North by Northwest, among other venues, got the idea a couple of years back for an event that would reach across the Philadelphia rock, neo-soul and DJ scenes.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | by Michael Hinkelman Daily News Staff Writer
City and local high-tech leaders said yesterday they planned to wage a multimedia marketing campaign aimed at convincing college students in the city to stay after graduation. More than 51,000 degrees are conferred each year by the region's colleges and universities, according to a recent report by the Pennsylvania Economy League. But many of those graduates don't hang around Philadelphia - one recent estimate by the state placed the percentage of departing grads as high as 40 percent.
NEWS
January 6, 2001 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former reporter for The Inquirer has settled a lawsuit in which he claimed he was defamed by the newspaper's top editor. Ralph Cipriano, a former religion writer, and Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of The Inquirer, issued a joint announcement yesterday saying Cipriano's litigation against the newspaper had ended. The terms of the settlement, including any financial details, were not made public. A confidentiality provision was made part of the agreement. Cipriano, 46, and Inquirer editor Robert J. Rosenthal both said they were pleased that the lawsuit had been resolved.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | by Mark Alan Hughes
I've been away, so you'll have to forgive me for being a little out of touch. I could follow the baseball stadium story, what with the newspapers available on the Web and all. But I missed the little flap between Buzz Bissinger and Paul Levy until a pal pointed it out to me. In case you missed it too, these guys, the famous author and the respected Center City District director, are dueling in print over Mayor Street's start and, therefore, over...
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
It would be an exaggeration to say "all eyes" of the music industry will be on Philadelphia the next few days - but not much. At least 1,500 performers and an equal number of industry professionals will be officially in the house for the seventh Philadelphia Music Conference. And several thousand more music lovers (like you and me) will be dropping in to enjoy PMC's nighttime club showcases, each featuring four or more acts striving at their very best performance level. Now the third biggest pop music conclave in the nation, PMC jump starts with a promising event Wednesday night at the Trocadero, "Decades of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the land that brought you the pop group Abba and IKEA furniture comes a new daily newspaper to be distributed for free on SEPTA trains, buses and trolleys. Designed to be read during a 20-minute transit ride, the 28-page publication will resemble a tabloid version of USA Today, offering snippets of local, state and national news, as well as sports, business and features. It will be produced by reporters and editors in Philadelphia starting in January. TPI Metro (short for Transit Publications Inc.)
LIVING
November 10, 1998 | By Fern Sternberg, FOR THE INQUIRER
Not every business has a skateboard ramp, but then not every business is like Space 1026 on Arch Street in Chinatown. On a recent afternoon, hip-hop bounced off high ceilings and lime green and gold walls; a dangling disco ball cast diamond-shaped shadows; pop-culture paintings on bedsheet canvases decorated open spaces; a cluster of twentysomethings engaged in excited conversations on vintage settees; a grunge-clad newcomer turned out 360s on...
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's funny, but Paul Levy doesn't look like a no-good, rotten, fascistic, anti-American, Albanian-style communistic, repressive authoritarian. He looks like a regular guy. But looks can deceive, your honor. After all, it was Levy, in his role as director of the Center City District, who just last year suggested that it might be time to do something to regulate the newspaper honor boxes on the streets. Levy thus violated one of the cardinal rules of politics: Never pick a fight with a guy who buys ink by the barrel.
LIVING
February 18, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Paper, the free weekly paper, said it would publish an article tomorrow conceding that a backstage interview with the star and director of the New York show Freak did not take place as presented. In last week's issue, freelance writer Jim Gladstone wrote that he had met with actor John Leguizamo and Freak's writer-director, David Bar Katz, at the Cort Theatre in Manhattan after a preview performance. Leguizamo was not present, said news editor Howard Altman. His quotes were taken from a published work and patched into dialogue with Katz, Altman said.
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