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NEWS
January 29, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
It is, as Joe Klein observes in the New Yorker, the Krakatoa of bimbo eruptions. President Clinton's alleged dalliance with a young intern could bring down his administration. And it raises a question: What are the chances of a major political scandal here? The last juicy local scandal was Abscam in 1979 and 1980, when some FBI agents dressed up as sheiks and plumbed the venality of Philadelphia's political class. The result: Three city councilmen and a congressman took bribes.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Contending he was libeled, State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo has sued the publisher of the City Paper and one of its editors, Howard Altman, over a recent column about Fumo's role on the Board of City Trusts. Fumo's lawsuit objected to Altman's use of language in the Nov. 14-20 issue of the City Paper describing the board as a "goon squad" that is "controlled by" the senator. The suit also cites Altman's characterization of the board's Stephen Girard College Trust as Fumo's "$230 million toy chest," which he uses "as private monopoly money with no accountability to anyone.
FOOD
August 6, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Martinis may be making a comeback - but margaritas, always kind of breezy and a bit wild to start with, never went away. Indeed, they've grown steadily more popular - to the point of being called America's most popular bar cocktail by those in the trade. Certainly the 400 or so people who showed up at Pompano Grille last week to sample entries in the Great Margarita Mix-Off have a special fondness for "Maggies. " A few die-hards even stuck it out through the three-hour mob scene that turned the corner of Fifth and Bainbridge into a mini-Margaritaville although the crowd seemed more South Beach than parrothead.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They arrived on West Market Street practically overnight - either boons to civic neatness or threats to cherished freedoms - but few passersby had any inkling of their implications. It was hard enough to figure out what they were. "A bike rack," said Marquis Hilfiger knowingly, as he studied a specimen at 16th and Market Streets. The 33-year-old box factory worker is an ardent cyclist. The object was a 3-foot-high, 8-foot-long cast-iron railing that looked something like a park bench without the bench.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cheryl Dunye knew she had created something for the books when she watched the final edit of her first feature film, The Watermelon Woman. But to be denounced in the Congressional Record was not what she had in mind. "I wouldn't show [this movie] to my parents. I wouldn't show it to my wife. I wouldn't want my kids to see it. I don't think any of my friends would want to see it," Rep. Pete Hoekstra (R., Mich.) said on the House floor in June, as he introduced an amendment to cut the National of Endowment for the Arts budget by the $31,500 it spent on Dunye's work.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services and the New York Daily News contributed to this report
Byko's Birthday Book TODAY: Chairwoman of the City Commission Marge Tartaglione registers 64; songbird Elisa Fiorillo warbles 28; Flyers captain Eric Lindros scores 24. TOMORROW: City Paper news editor Howard Altman is logical at 37. SUNDAY: Temple U's Miss America Suzette Charles reigns 34. If Jewel had it to do all over again, maybe she'd wear underwear. You remember Jewel, the lovely young nominee for best new artist at Wednesday night's Grammy Award festivities.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
So who was that willowy blonde photographed on Mayor Rendell's arm at President Clinton's inauguration? Well, all right, it could have been any number of willowy blondes. But in this case it was Mary Frangipanni, the Zelig of Philadelphia politics. She's the same woman pictured in the Jan. 26 Inquirer with bigshots at the 140th anniversary concert for the Academy of Music - and last winter at the meeting of the English Speaking Union. And the same one seen at the Academy Ball, the Gay News Christmas Party, the Shubert Festival Dinner.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You see a stub left over from last month's Peco bill. Al Dezzi sees Scarlett O'Hara. Yes, that Scarlett. To Dezzi, who heads the city's Recycling Office, choosing to bundle up the old Peco statement along with other papers is like the options facing that green-eyed beauty in Gone With the Wind: The old way didn't work anymore for the planter's daughter, and she had to adapt to survive. What better metaphor for recycling? Dezzi asked. "Recycling is about making changes in life," he said last week.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The weekly City Paper's scoop on the cleanup, fix-up, paint-up job on state Sen. Vincent Fumo's Victorian mansion in Fairmount may prove as slippery as a freshly waxed hardwood floor. Fumo is seeking to hold the giveaway newspaper in contempt of court for obtaining off-limits city records detailing renovation work on the 19th century mansion on Green Street. Common Pleas Judge Albert W. Sheppard, who ordered the building permits sealed last year, has not ruled on the contempt charge.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The story in the Philadelphia Weekly about the long-ago love affair between the burly baseball slugger and the baby-voiced actress was sweet and sentimental. It also was a fake. The July 3 cover story featured supposedly long-lost love letters between Philadelphia baseball star Jimmie Foxx and actress Judy Holliday, written in the summer of '45. The newspaper's editor, Tim Whitaker, said yesterday that the story and letters were invented by freelance writer Tom McGrath.
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