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NEWS
October 15, 2005
Greatness is not always cuddly. Edmund Bacon, the legendary city planner who died yesterday at age 95, was undeniably great. It's hard to imagine what Philadelphia would be today had Ed Bacon not made it his laboratory, his labor, his love for all those decades. Mr. Bacon was also undeniably stubborn and combative. He was always ready to fight the good fight, and some that were a little dubious. Few men harbor dreams for their city as grand as the ones he dreamt for Philadelphia; fewer still see so many of their ideas turned into glass and steel and concrete and macadam.
NEWS
January 15, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Hengst's first career, as a city planner, lasted 25 years before he arrived at what he calls "my midlife correction. " "It was not a crisis," he insists. The short version of the story is that Hengst grew tired of master plans and office politics. His mother died. He bought a house in Mount Airy that had a yard. He planted a garden. The longer narrative is more complex, but the plot stays true: As the garden came alive, slowly, slowly, so did he. "I began to build a new life," he says happily.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia is a city that struggles with certain disadvantages. It is not easy being stuck midway between the nation's financial and political capitals. It doesn't regularly produce winning sports teams. We don't have enough corporate giants headquartered here, or enough of the philanthropists who trail in their wake. But the most inexplicable shortcoming, it's always seemed to me, was that there's no biography of Edmund Bacon. Bacon was not merely the greatest urban planner Philadelphia ever produced, he was also one of the greatest characters to figure on the city stage in the 20th century.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
The last time most of us reflected on South Korea, it might have been to ponder the "Asian flu," or the tragic starvation suffered by victims of North Korea's poor and repressive regime. There is more to South Korea, however, than worrisome news, and the world will get introduced to him on July Fourth. He is Korean President Kim Dae Jung, who has been selected for this year's Philadelphia Liberty Medal. With yesterday's announcement, Mr. Kim joins a sublime company that includes Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk, Vaclav Havel, King Hussein and Shimon Peres.
NEWS
September 7, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin H. Folk III, 82, a former city planner in Philadelphia, died of emphysema on Saturday, July 3, in the hospice at Chandler Hall, the retirement community in Newtown Township, Bucks County. A memorial has been set for 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 26, at his former residence, Friends Village, 331 Lower Dolington Rd., Newtown. Mr. Folk was executive director of the Citizens Council on City Planning in Philadelphia from 1962 until it closed in 1971. A history of the council states that it acted as a private watchdog over the City Planning Commission.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In silence and in the dark, Ed Bacon listened yesterday as the architects who created the new - and likely final - plan for remaking Independence Mall went through their proposal slide-by-slide at a public briefing. He was not amused by what he heard. Before the lights went up, the 87-year-old urban planner was on his feet and on his way to the front of the auditorium. A National Park Service ranger handed him the microphone. "There is," Bacon said, "not a single idea in the whole damn thing.
NEWS
January 28, 2008 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter has tapped a city planner who specializes in urban revitalization to be Philadelphia's next commerce director and deputy mayor for economic development. Andrew Altman, a former city planner in Washington, oversaw ambitious waterfront development there and was widely praised. In a 2004 article, the Washington Business Journal called him "arguably the most sought-after planner in the country. " Altman, 45, a native of Philadelphia, is to be sworn in today to a job he called "a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This was classic Ed Bacon, in one breath scolding a group of talkers, in another stirring grown men and women to sing "America the Beautiful. " At 85 years old, here was the formidable city planner yesterday, hopping from plan to model to painting, leading students and luminaries and camera crews alike - a snow-peaked pied piper delivering a passionate plea to do something grand with Independence Mall. "If you don't act now," he urged, "it's all going to be destroyed.
NEWS
October 9, 1997
Yesterday's commentary by Edmund N. Bacon may have implied that Mr. Bacon is the current city planner of Philadelphia. His recent efforts regarding the redesign of Independence Mall are being made as a private citizen, more than 37 years after the end of his tenure as city planner.
NEWS
June 22, 1999 | MICHAEL MALLY / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Graham S. Finney, a retired city planner, last night received the Philadelphia Medal. He has helped to shape Center City and to make home-buying available for low-income families.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - Instead of being lost forever to housing development along the waterfront of this gateway town to Ocean City, a little theater tucked along Bay Avenue will be sticking around for another encore. And the Gateway Playhouse - which has been sitting idle for nearly a decade - could become the centerpiece of an ongoing effort to redevelop the waterfront area along Great Bay as a dining and arts and entertainment district. Earlier this month, officials announced the city had received two state grants totaling about $500,000.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richardson Dilworth was a Pittsburgh-born lawyer who adopted Philadelphia as his home and fought as a Marine in World War I, earning a Purple Heart. He reenlisted at age 43 to fight in World War II and was awarded the Silver Star for bravery at Guadalcanal. That alone would be a remarkable life, but Dilworth had political aspirations. He and reform ally Joseph S. Clark ended nearly seven decades of Republican rule when they were elected district attorney and mayor, respectively, in 1951.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia is a city that struggles with certain disadvantages. It is not easy being stuck midway between the nation's financial and political capitals. It doesn't regularly produce winning sports teams. We don't have enough corporate giants headquartered here, or enough of the philanthropists who trail in their wake. But the most inexplicable shortcoming, it's always seemed to me, was that there's no biography of Edmund Bacon. Bacon was not merely the greatest urban planner Philadelphia ever produced, he was also one of the greatest characters to figure on the city stage in the 20th century.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Think the public restrooms in Portland are really cool and want to bring them to Philadelphia? Now you can share this idea and your other wildest urban dreams with city planners and others in PHL2035: The Game! , an online project launched last week by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission that aims to give Philadelphians more say about the policies and projects that affect them. You can sign up to play here: http://communityplanit.org/phl2035/ The game will be available until Feb. 18. Players answer questions and encounter situations affecting the University/Southwest Planning District, which includes Kingsessing, Cedar Park, Walnut Hill, Spruce Hill, Powelton Village, Saunders Park, West Powelton, West Shore, and University City.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
If you've always suspected that not much separates the can-do executive from the megalomaniacal tyrant, now you have Carl R. Greene as proof that the Boss From Hell really is The Boss From Hell . Still, it's hard to believe that a man who appears to have behaved like a monster with his staff could have done so much to make Philadelphia a more livable and successful city. Greene's accomplishments at the helm of the Philadelphia Housing Authority may not be foremost in our minds right now, as we stand with our mouths agape, watching him implode his own life with the same compulsive efficiency he used to implode the city's blighted public-housing towers.
NEWS
September 7, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin H. Folk III, 82, a former city planner in Philadelphia, died of emphysema on Saturday, July 3, in the hospice at Chandler Hall, the retirement community in Newtown Township, Bucks County. A memorial has been set for 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 26, at his former residence, Friends Village, 331 Lower Dolington Rd., Newtown. Mr. Folk was executive director of the Citizens Council on City Planning in Philadelphia from 1962 until it closed in 1971. A history of the council states that it acted as a private watchdog over the City Planning Commission.
NEWS
September 5, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year before the National Council of Teachers of English was to host its convention here, Jacqui Joseph-Biddle met with officials at the Convention Center to discuss details. Her group, 8,000 strong, had particular needs. Would it be possible, Joseph-Biddle asked, for her staff to erect a 10-foot-by-10-foot display inside a larger exhibit booth? "No problem," she was told. But on the eve of the convention in November, no problem turned into no way. She was told she had to hire three carpenters, plus a supervisor, to erect the display.
NEWS
January 15, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Hengst's first career, as a city planner, lasted 25 years before he arrived at what he calls "my midlife correction. " "It was not a crisis," he insists. The short version of the story is that Hengst grew tired of master plans and office politics. His mother died. He bought a house in Mount Airy that had a yard. He planted a garden. The longer narrative is more complex, but the plot stays true: As the garden came alive, slowly, slowly, so did he. "I began to build a new life," he says happily.
NEWS
January 29, 2008 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New city Managing Director Camille Cates Barnett formally began her job yesterday, three weeks later than expected after the death of her husband earlier this month. And she immediately got down to business. "We are going to make Philadelphia the model for the most effective government around," she said, promising to implement a city 311 phone-information system by the end of the year. Similar to the 911 emergency system, the 311 nonemergency system would give residents a simple way to call for all types of city services.
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