CollectionsCity School District
IN THE NEWS

City School District

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia schools may yet benefit from legalization of ride hailing in the city. A bill introduced Thursday in Harrisburg by Democratic State Sen. Vincent Hughes would guarantee money for the cash-starved Philadelphia School District if ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft begin paying fees, taxes, and penalties through regulation. The bill would also upend a proposed funding formula that gives the Philadelphia Parking Authority a minimum of $2.5 million and leaving the district with scant chance of getting a dime.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The immediate crisis for the Philadelphia School District may have been averted last week, but the long-term crisis is very real. On Thursday, Mayor Rendell and Superintendent David Hornbeck announced that two local banks had come through with letters of credit that will allow the district to borrow enough money to keep the schools open all of next school year. That, in all likelihood, should avoid a threatened takeover by the state. On Friday, the Board of Education adopted its 1998-99 budget - one that has $55 million more in expenditures than it does revenues.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | For The Inquirer / Alex Lloyd Gross
Firefighters work on a fire that destroyed five school buses last night in the Far Northeast. The buses, which belonged to the city school district, were at the Shallcross Special School. The fire, which was reported at 10:15 p.m. and was under control 15 minutes later, was under investigation. No one was hurt.
NEWS
April 7, 2005
WITH ALL the turmoil in the mayor's office, it's easy to overlook our city school district. Scores have gone up again this year, but that's really the only good news. More certified teachers are retiring, more schools are falling apart because vendors are not getting paid on time, custodial manpower in these buildings have been shorted. Administrators who fail at one school are given a better one to screw up. Managers are hiring their friends at more than $100,000 a pop even though they were terminated at another venue.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eric Rosenbaum, 79, retired head of foreign languages at Philadelphia High School for Girls, died of cancer yesterday at his home in the Northeast. Mr. Rosenbaum was proficient in French, German, Italian, Hebrew, Latin, Spanish and Russian. He had published in professional journals, and was a member of the Advanced Placement College Entrance Examination Board. Born in Berlin, Mr. Rosenbaum came to the United States in 1937 and enlisted in the Army shortly before the bombing of Pearl Harbor, his family said.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The head of the city school district Diversity Office, assigned to help solve racial problems at South Philadelphia High, has resigned after eight months on the job. Theos McKinney left the district this week to accept an out-of-state job offer, according to schools spokesperson Fernando Gallard. "We wish him good luck and thank him for a wonderful job," Gallard said. "We will be looking for a suitable person to replace him. " Efforts to reach McKinney were unsuccessful. McKinney, an attorney, held the title of executive director of Diversity Education and Training.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joan A. Gould Gilbert, 63, a former member of the Burlington Township Board of Education, died Tuesday at Rancocas Hospital, Willingboro. A township resident for more the 55 years, she served two terms on the board, from 1981 to 1987. During her tenure, Mrs. Gilbert was credited with championing the creation of the district's Homework Hotline, which is still helping students with their schoolwork. She learned about the idea while attending a convention in Jacksonville, Fla., where the city school district was operating a similar program, according to a 1986 article in The Inquirer.
NEWS
June 20, 1996 | DAILY NEWS
Besides accountability, there are other issues on the table in negotiations between the city school district and the Philadelphia Teachers Federation. SALARY. Teachers got a 5 percent pay raise over two years, partially by restructuring some benefits. This time, money's a bigger problem, especially after wrenching budget cuts. Teachers will look at what the Rendell administration gives city workers, who are negotiating for their own new contracts. Teachers will expect to get at least what they get. BENEFITS.
NEWS
September 5, 2002 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Schweiker called Mayor Street his "soul mate" - at least when it comes to education. Street heralded Schweiker as a man who keeps his word. And, as they swapped praise, those who work around them shook hands, joked, laughed, and shook pom-poms - all part of yesterday's celebration to open the new school year in Philadelphia under a historic partnership between the state and city. After more than a year of sometimes acrimonious negotiations and dealings, state and city officials put on a united and happy front as they participated in the district's "A Fresh Start" campaign.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Here's some good news out of Washington for Philadelphia. The child-nutrition bill passed last week by the Senate not only funds school lunches, but also will allow the city school district to continue its successful Universal Feeding Program. The reprieve means the district can continue to serve free meals to more than 110,000 students without requiring their parents to complete paperwork documenting their income level. That step seems superfluous in a city with so many families living in poverty.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia schools may yet benefit from legalization of ride hailing in the city. A bill introduced Thursday in Harrisburg by Democratic State Sen. Vincent Hughes would guarantee money for the cash-starved Philadelphia School District if ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft begin paying fees, taxes, and penalties through regulation. The bill would also upend a proposed funding formula that gives the Philadelphia Parking Authority a minimum of $2.5 million and leaving the district with scant chance of getting a dime.
NEWS
March 23, 2016
For months, I've advocated for detailed annual audits of the nearly $3 billion the Philadelphia School District spends. Despite efforts by City Controller Alan Butkovitz to make that happen, those audits still have not taken place. Yet when I spoke with Dr. William Hite, the district superintendent, in a radio interview nearly nine months ago, he told me he was open to such audits being performed. However, when Butkovitz forwarded a draft resolution detailing the scope of the audits to the School District's chief operational officer, Fran Burns, there was no response.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
SASHEIKA DUFFUS is pleading to rehire counselors and teachers. Mayegan Brown is advocating for more administrators. Now the two 11th-graders have a chance to be heard - or read or seen - thanks to a campaign launched yesterday by Mayor Nutter called "Students Speak!" that allows students to submit a written or video essay on the need for full and fair funding in the city's public schools. "Education is about these young people," Nutter said in announcing the initiative at A. Philip Randolph Career Academy in Nicetown during a joint news conference with Superintendent William Hite and Philadelphia Federation of Teachers president Jerry Jordan.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
An idle mind is the devil's workshop. That old saying comes to mind when you think of the thousands of youths in the city who can find nothing worthwhile to do after school lets out. Given that situation, it was good to see the Nutter administration and the School District strike a deal to provide after-school programs for more than 16,000 youngsters this winter. With both city government and the district in financial crunches, it makes sense for them to team up to preserve recreation and other activities at school gyms.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The letter begins, as so many dreaded letters do, "We deeply regret to inform you that your employment with The School District of Philadelphia will end no later than Sept. 14, 2012. " There are 850 such communiqu├ęs, following the slew sent this summer, to maintenance mechanics, building engineers, custodians, and all bus drivers for the district, who transport 35,000 students every school day, more than a quarter with special needs. Because their contract stipulates a one-year notification of dismissal, almost 1,200 district employees now work with the mop of Damocles over their heads.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By DAFNEY TALES, JAN RANSOM & CATHERINE LUCEY, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
IN A SHOW of solidarity, dignitaries gathered at City Hall yesterday to celebrate what they described as an "unprecedented" coming together of city, state and school officials to oversee district finances. And all it took to get them into the same room and on the same page was a $629 million deficit, plans for massive cuts, proposals for tax hikes and the public embarrassment of the mayor. But indeed they did, and all those involved say they look forward to begin working under the "Education Accountability Agreement.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Here's some good news out of Washington for Philadelphia. The child-nutrition bill passed last week by the Senate not only funds school lunches, but also will allow the city school district to continue its successful Universal Feeding Program. The reprieve means the district can continue to serve free meals to more than 110,000 students without requiring their parents to complete paperwork documenting their income level. That step seems superfluous in a city with so many families living in poverty.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The head of the city school district Diversity Office, assigned to help solve racial problems at South Philadelphia High, has resigned after eight months on the job. Theos McKinney left the district this week to accept an out-of-state job offer, according to schools spokesperson Fernando Gallard. "We wish him good luck and thank him for a wonderful job," Gallard said. "We will be looking for a suitable person to replace him. " Efforts to reach McKinney were unsuccessful. McKinney, an attorney, held the title of executive director of Diversity Education and Training.
NEWS
December 4, 2009
Philadelphia schools Superintendent Arlene Ackerman should move forward with a proposal to raise the performance bar for the city's charter schools. But she should not include provisions that would put unfair enrollment restrictions on successful charters and limit opportunities for students. More oversight and accountability are long overdue for charters, which educate 30,000 city students using more than $279 million in taxpayers' funds. Ackerman, though, also wants the School Reform Commission to unfairly limit when charters can enroll more students or change their grade configurations.
NEWS
June 3, 2007 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ken Hartman was talking about his favorite subject: technology and its impact on education. "It's truly exciting in online learning right now, because it's where the growth is occurring in education," said Hartman, a Cherry Hill resident and the director of academic affairs at Drexel University's eLearning, an online education subsidiary. Hartman looks ahead - well, actually, it's happening now on a trial basis - and sees the Internet on school buses. "Soon, students will have the ability to communicate with their teachers on the way to school and on the way home," he said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|