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NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
They walked in wearing matching T-shirts, banged on drums, and waved posters and flags as though cheering a home team. They were, in a way. They were celebrating the virtues of the schools they love in a plea to save them. That was the message Saturday as scores of students, faculty, parents, and community members attended a daylong hearing of the School Reform Commission. It was the last chance for supporters to make their case for schools the School District of Philadelphia has targeted for closing.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
By Jack Stollsteimer The recent news that the Philadelphia School District has seen its number of "persistently dangerous" schools drop by 20 percent should be cause for optimism. Disciplinary policy changes that I advocated while I was the state safe schools advocate, which were implemented with the strong support of Mayor Nutter and Superintendent Arlene Ackerman in 2008, may be having the hoped-for effect. With most matters in the school district, however, every step forward is accompanied by at least one step backward.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | By David Boldt
Trying to do some out-of-the-box thinking that might make Mayor Street's meeting with Gov. Ridge on education funding next week something other than a remake of Gunfight at the OK Corral, I have come up with a couple of suggestions. One would be for the mayor, before the meeting, to turn over to the school district a major portion of the record $206 million surplus the city amassed last year. By putting money where his mouth is, the mayor could suppress the argument - often heard in Harrisburg - that not even city officials think lack of money is the problem in the city schools, as shown by the fact that Philadelphia spends much less on education, proportionally, than other cities.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the opening of city schools five days away, contract talks between the Philadelphia School District and the teachers' union continued Wednesday without reaching a tentative agreement, both sides said. George Jackson, a spokesman for the 15,000-member Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, said the district and the union would take a break Thursday to observe Rosh Hashanah. Negotiations are set to resume Friday. Also Wednesday, Jackson said the union had put on hold new ads blaming Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett for the district's financial crisis because PFT president Jerry Jordan is scheduled to meet with the mayor later this week.
SPORTS
February 23, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The idea of a tournament among the city's six Division I basketball schools has been around for more than a decade, almost since Big 5 games began moving to campus sites and certainly since Villanova opted out of the full round robin. Play the tournament over a weekend in December with two teams getting byes (or invite two among Delaware, Princeton and Penn State and make it an eight-team tournament). Try any of the dozen formats that have been suggested. Get corporate sponsorship.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a woman in the top job at the Chelsea school department this year. Her name's Diana Lam and she's both the first woman and the first Hispanic superintendent in the city's history. But that is not what makes her appointment remarkable. The fact is, the people who hired Lam last summer don't sit on the local school board. They work for Boston University and hold titles such as dean of education. It's BU that is paying Lam's $75,000 salary, and BU to whom Lam is ultimately accountable.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
An offshoot of New York state's Working Families Party has been striving under the radar for the last six months to push Philadelphia-area politics and policy leftward. Pennsylvania Working Families helped win voter approval May 20 of a City Charter change requiring city subcontractors to pay their workers a "living wage" above the federal minimum. And last week, its canvassers turned in just under 40,000 petition signatures to put a nonbinding resolution on the November ballot demanding an end to state control of Philadelphia schools.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passionate pleas from students and others Saturday put William R. Hite Jr. on the defensive just three months into his job as superintendent of the Philadelphia School District. Hite got an earful during a two-hour public meeting over his recommendations to close or relocate 44 schools throughout the city. "Our children are not for sale!" exclaimed Gail Clouden, 57, a community activist from West Philadelphia. "People are not for sale!" To which Hite responded: "This has to do with funding, and when you don't have funds, you have to make the best use of the money you have.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITER
Ringing giant bells and declaring optimism, School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. and Mayor Kenney formally opened the 2016-17 school year for 130,000 Philadelphia students Wednesday. "Nothing excites me more than the first day of school," Hite said from the steps of Hill-Freedman World Academy in East Mount Airy. The school system is in its strongest position in years, he said, pointing to investments in new textbooks, technology, and other resources not seen in city schools since the advent of a brutal budget crisis several years ago. Kenney, who has made education a centerpiece of his administration, also struck a hopeful note.
NEWS
September 9, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA SCHOOLS New textbooks shouldn't be news A new school year has started in Philadelphia ("New thing in city schools: New books," Tuesday). How wonderful that the children will have new books, technology, counselors, and nurses. How dreadful that this is such a rare occurrence for the schools that it is the headline across the top of the front page. Of course there should be books and technology and counselors and nurses. This should be a matter of course.
NEWS
September 7, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
When 130,000 students report to Philadelphia public-school classrooms Wednesday, they will be greeted by a novelty in city schools: brand-new textbooks. For the first time in years, the Philadelphia School District is providing fresh reading and math materials for students citywide. That $35 million investment is no small thing for the system routinely rocked by financial crises. "This is the most optimistic I've been since I've been superintendent," William R. Hite Jr. said of the 2016-17 school year.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
HYDRATION STATIONS have arrived in the School District of Philadelphia. The stations - water fountains equipped with filters and separate faucets from which to fill water bottles - will be up and running at 43 schools when classes start next month, school officials announced Monday. Each school is receiving at least three hydration stations, and plans call for the remainder of the district's more than 170 schools to receive stations by the end of the school year, spokesman Kevin Geary said.
NEWS
August 17, 2016
Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes made waves in 1977 with their hit record, "This Time It's For Real. " Superintendent William H. Hite Jr. may be humming a similar tune when Philadelphia schools open in three weeks. He's much more certain that the district won't have to beg for another large infusion of cash to make it through the school year. "While we continue to have work to do, the Philadelphia School District begins the 2016-17 school year more optimistic than we have been in years as we work toward our goal of great schools close to where children live," Hite told the Inquirer Editorial Board.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: Do you have any general advice on how to make big decisions? My husband and I are trying to decide if we're going to stay in D.C. in a house and area we love or move to the 'burbs for kid reasons. We're very happy where we are right now, which means the impetus to take action is really low. The desire to move comes from imagining a time when we might be less happy (i.e., dealing with finding a good school in the city). I know a lot of people do it, but they're more motivated and organized than we are. I really value the idea of having a decent neighborhood school vs. having to navigate the lottery and stress that come with schooling in D.C. We get advice that we should make the move only when we really need to, but we're already forming such wonderful bonds with local families that I hate the idea of pulling up even bigger roots.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District will receive an additional $50 million in state funds this fiscal year under the spending plan approved Wednesday in Harrisburg, district officials said. While that's $6 million less than expected, officials said the shortfall was manageable and could be partially offset by the district's share of funds collected from ride-sharing services in the city. "I do think that it is important to acknowledge the governor, the leaders of both parties, and the Philadelphia delegation," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said during a short news briefing on the budget Thursday.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
When other high school seniors are fretting over test scores and class rank, Adrianna Branin's struggle is to be called by the right pronoun. For Branin, 17, who was born female and appears feminine and attends Franklin Learning Center and will graduate Monday wearing a navy blue boys' robe, it's never she. Branin prefers them, they, or their. And when the principal or teachers slip up and call Branin she, Branin is offended. "Pronouns are huge," Branin, who works at Attic Youth Center, which aids and supports LGBTQ youth, said in an interview Friday.
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