CollectionsCity Schools
IN THE NEWS

City Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
They walked in wearing matching T-shirts, banged on drums, and waved posters and flags as though cheering a home team. They were, in a way. They were celebrating the virtues of the schools they love in a plea to save them. That was the message Saturday as scores of students, faculty, parents, and community members attended a daylong hearing of the School Reform Commission. It was the last chance for supporters to make their case for schools the School District of Philadelphia has targeted for closing.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
By Jack Stollsteimer The recent news that the Philadelphia School District has seen its number of "persistently dangerous" schools drop by 20 percent should be cause for optimism. Disciplinary policy changes that I advocated while I was the state safe schools advocate, which were implemented with the strong support of Mayor Nutter and Superintendent Arlene Ackerman in 2008, may be having the hoped-for effect. With most matters in the school district, however, every step forward is accompanied by at least one step backward.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | By David Boldt
Trying to do some out-of-the-box thinking that might make Mayor Street's meeting with Gov. Ridge on education funding next week something other than a remake of Gunfight at the OK Corral, I have come up with a couple of suggestions. One would be for the mayor, before the meeting, to turn over to the school district a major portion of the record $206 million surplus the city amassed last year. By putting money where his mouth is, the mayor could suppress the argument - often heard in Harrisburg - that not even city officials think lack of money is the problem in the city schools, as shown by the fact that Philadelphia spends much less on education, proportionally, than other cities.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the opening of city schools five days away, contract talks between the Philadelphia School District and the teachers' union continued Wednesday without reaching a tentative agreement, both sides said. George Jackson, a spokesman for the 15,000-member Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, said the district and the union would take a break Thursday to observe Rosh Hashanah. Negotiations are set to resume Friday. Also Wednesday, Jackson said the union had put on hold new ads blaming Mayor Nutter and Gov. Corbett for the district's financial crisis because PFT president Jerry Jordan is scheduled to meet with the mayor later this week.
SPORTS
February 23, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The idea of a tournament among the city's six Division I basketball schools has been around for more than a decade, almost since Big 5 games began moving to campus sites and certainly since Villanova opted out of the full round robin. Play the tournament over a weekend in December with two teams getting byes (or invite two among Delaware, Princeton and Penn State and make it an eight-team tournament). Try any of the dozen formats that have been suggested. Get corporate sponsorship.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a woman in the top job at the Chelsea school department this year. Her name's Diana Lam and she's both the first woman and the first Hispanic superintendent in the city's history. But that is not what makes her appointment remarkable. The fact is, the people who hired Lam last summer don't sit on the local school board. They work for Boston University and hold titles such as dean of education. It's BU that is paying Lam's $75,000 salary, and BU to whom Lam is ultimately accountable.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
An offshoot of New York state's Working Families Party has been striving under the radar for the last six months to push Philadelphia-area politics and policy leftward. Pennsylvania Working Families helped win voter approval May 20 of a City Charter change requiring city subcontractors to pay their workers a "living wage" above the federal minimum. And last week, its canvassers turned in just under 40,000 petition signatures to put a nonbinding resolution on the November ballot demanding an end to state control of Philadelphia schools.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passionate pleas from students and others Saturday put William R. Hite Jr. on the defensive just three months into his job as superintendent of the Philadelphia School District. Hite got an earful during a two-hour public meeting over his recommendations to close or relocate 44 schools throughout the city. "Our children are not for sale!" exclaimed Gail Clouden, 57, a community activist from West Philadelphia. "People are not for sale!" To which Hite responded: "This has to do with funding, and when you don't have funds, you have to make the best use of the money you have.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Security problems have increased at schools and other Philadelphia School District properties since Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker reduced the number of police officers assigned to patrol schools, district officials acknowledged yesterday. While the schools themselves are secure, "outside of the schools there are problems" with disruptive and unruly youths, said Alfred W. Dean, the school district's director of security, in remarks to reporters after testifying before City Council's Appropriations Committee.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moments after buying some Advil and bottled water at a Suburban Station newsstand, Serena Starnes realized that she was out of cigarettes. She quickly went back and paid $9.50 for a pack of Newports. Had Starnes been in the suburbs, she would have paid much less because of the city's $2-a-pack tax earmarked for city schools. The extra $2 stings, but at least the money is going to help educate her children, the unemployed barber said. "It's good because it's going toward the schools," the mother of nine said.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It's hard to argue with an independent arbitrator's recent ruling that the School Reform Commission must provide a full-time counselor for every Philadelphia school. The need is glaring and should be a priority. But putting the decision in the context of the School District's poor financial condition provides a different perspective. It's too bad the arbitrator didn't issue his opinion until after City Council began its summer recess. Maybe the need to restore more of the 283 counselor positions vacated to save money in 2013 would have prompted Council to meet the district's request for an additional $103 million.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
In a sweep of Philadelphia public schools, investigators from the City Controller's Office found a litany of health and safety threats, including exposed electrical wires, cockroaches, and widespread water damage. City Controller Alan Butkovitz, in releasing a report detailing "outrageous" School District building conditions, said his office found immediate health hazards that seemed to be largely ignored by district officials. "Why isn't that a public health emergency?" Butkovitz asked at a news conference.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
With no end in sight to budget debates in Harrisburg, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission adopted a spending plan Tuesday that guarantees little else beyond schools opening on time in September. The SRC unanimously approved a $2.6 billion budget that could rise to $2.8 billion, depending on how much money state lawmakers appropriate for Philadelphia schools. Principals and central office staff, however, will have no authority to spend beyond this year's austerity levels until a state budget deal is reached.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Third-grade teacher Elaine Blackmon took a deep breath and made her best sales pitch. "What's good for Philadelphia public students is good for students across the commonwealth," Blackmon told an impassive assistant to Rep. Martin Causer (R., McKean). "We're asking him to reconsider Gov. Wolf's budget. " Blackmon was among hundreds of people who descended on the state Capitol on Monday to lobby lawmakers deep in negotiations to pass a state budget. Among them were more 100 teachers, nurses, and other members of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, sporting red T-shirts and making their case for more funding for city schools.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the city's top high schools just got more support for its newest venture, a middle school launching in the fall. Carver High School for Engineering and Science, which is expanding to serve 120 seventh and eighth graders in September, has been awarded $200,000 from the Philadelphia School Partnership, officials announced Thursday. That's on top of a $147,000 grant that PSP, a deep-pocketed nonprofit, already awarded to Carver to fund planning for its middle school. The newest award will support more planning as the school develops at 16th and West Norris Streets, principal Ted Domers said.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the eleventh hour, several community and nonprofit groups are crying foul over the city's plan to auction 938 tax liens - in an online endeavor that is to begin Wednesday and end Monday - in the hope of collecting millions of dollars in unpaid property taxes and related fees. The sale is for control of a tax lien - essentially a claim attached to commercial and residential properties and vacant lots with unpaid real estate taxes, not the property itself. The auction is a pilot program that could result in other lien sales, according to the Nutter administration.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
When her medically fragile son was in kindergarten, Sabrina Jones had a rotating cast of private-duty nurses at his Philadelphia public school. "It just wasn't a good experience," said Jones - too little consistency, no real connection with her son, who has a feeding tube. But when he moved to a school that had a full-time nurse, she said, things improved dramatically. "The relationship between the nurse and my child is essential," said Jones, whose son is now a fourth grader at Lingelbach School in Germantown.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state Senate committee on Tuesday approved a bill that would create a state-run system to take over low-performing Pennsylvania schools, sending to the full chamber a measure that Philadelphia's superintendent said could be devastating to city schools. Modeled after similar legislation in states such as Louisiana and Tennessee, Senate Bill 6 mandates that the lowest-performing 5 percent of schools - as defined by the state's school performance profile - transform themselves within three years, either by contracting with outside providers or converting to charters.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WITH JUST TWO weeks to go before City Council recesses for the summer, it does not appear likely that $105 million in new funding for the School District of Philadelphia will be approved, Council President Darrell Clarke said yesterday. "There does not appear to be support for that at this time, after four successive years of raising taxes to the tune of over $350 million," a somber Clarke said. "There's not a lot of appetite to have another significant tax increase. " He said Council would "push forward" to make sure the school district's $85 million budget deficit is dealt with this month, but added that the legislative body would use means other than a tax increase to help the schools provide educational enhancements requested by Superintendent William Hite.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|