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NEWS
November 25, 1996 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Ever wonder how many potholes the city can fix in a year? Or how many restaurant inspections it conducts? Or what response time is for 911 calls? It's all there in the first annual Mayor's Report on City Services being released today by the Rendell administration, and soon to be available in public libraries. "Too often, we're the nameless, faceless government," said David L. Cohen, Mayor Rendell's chief of staff. "We're these big stone edifices in Center City. You pay your taxes and it disappears into a black hole.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By JOHN GOOD
Edward G. Rendell's ads before the primary election featured a picture of City Hall that, through the magic of photo montage, looked as if the building had been picked up and dropped to earth, tower first. The message was that Rendell intended to "turn City Hall upside down" and restore confidence in city government. It is a compelling and appropriate metaphor, and no doubt contributed to Rendell's victory. It's also a good idea whose time has come. But it is one thing to say that one intends to turn things upside-down, and quite another to do it. To really turn things for the better, it will be necessary to change the prevailing assumptions about the way government works.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So how well are Philadelphia's 24,000 municipal employees spending the taxpayers' money? Glad you asked, says the brand-new Mayor's Report on City Services. "The city has done an impressive job of improving its core services over the last three years," the document reads. The proof, the report goes on, is in the numbers: Ninety-five percent of the city's trash was collected on time last year, if you don't count the winter storm months. In 1994 the rate was 64 percent.
NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Patrick Kerkstra and Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Nutter today will present to City Council a $3.84 billion budget and a five-year plan that seek to solve the city's worst fiscal crisis in decades through steep, and temporary, tax increases and a full frontal assault on city workers' salaries, health-care, and retirement benefits. There will also be spending cuts - including the elimination of 250 city positions - and an assortment of new fees. Some of the reductions have potent symbolic value, among them an overall 22 percent cut in administrative costs and a 500-vehicle reduction in the city's fleet.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Dwight Ott contributed to this story
Every evening, just as the sun loses its glow and begins to sink behind the Philadelphia skyline, the Rev. Sal Scuderi walks through his South Camden parish. He waves hello to married couples enjoying the late summer blooms of their front gardens. He steps over the chalk outline of children's hopscotch games. He chats with four men playing dominoes. He frowns at the young men dealing drugs from rowhouse steps. He sympathizes with families who have struggled hard to keep up their houses, only to live next door to a building surrendered to plywood sheeting and broken windows.
NEWS
December 5, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once presumed dead, the 311 non-emergency number is again showing signs of life in Philadelphia. But just barely. Similar services, sometimes called "constituent contact centers," have been an enormous success in such cities as Baltimore, New York and Chicago, simultaneously easing the burden on overwhelmed 911 call centers while making municipal government more responsive to citizen complaints. But 311 never got off the ground in Philadelphia. The Street administration talked up the service in 2002 but opted to table it in 2003 because of budget and staffing concerns, said Joseph James, deputy commissioner of the city's Department of Public Property.
NEWS
December 21, 2009 | By A.J. THOMSON
TO superstitious Philadelphia fans, Mayor Nutter's announcement before World Series Game 6 that the city would not be paying for a victory parade was all we needed to hear to know the Phillies would be in an uphill battle in Yankee Stadium. You think parade - but you don't talk about it, especially if you're admitting we can't afford to throw a once-in-a-lifetime repeat party for the region. But, jinx aside, it gets you thinking about what it is that we're really a part of here in Philadelphia: We're at the point we can't pay for a repeat World Series championship parade.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | By Peter Nicholas, Craig R. McCoy, Suzanne Sataline and Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Contributing to this article were Inquirer staff writers Ralph Cipriano, Marc Duvoisin, David O'Reilly, Marjorie Valbrun, Dianna Marder and Marc Kaufman
It's Friday noon in the airless 14th-floor office of the Municipal Services Building. A cold rain is starting to dot the windows. The snow's been on the ground for five days, and an icy night is ahead. The mayor's got an armada of plows on the street, but he's taking political hits from several sides. And these men and women, city officials responsible for parking, traffic, police, vehicles, highways and garbage, are charged with cleaning up the biggest blizzard you've ever seen. Do they have enough wreckers to keep plowing in South Philly?
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
CITY CONTROLLER Alan Butkovitz took a serious shot at Mayor Nutter's legacy yesterday, accusing him of running a "VIP hot line" for the well-connected to call round-the-clock for city services. For Nutter, who ran for the city's top office in 2007 promising to provide equal access to all city services, that could not stand. His staff quickly pushed back, saying Butkovitz didn't bother to learn the facts before issuing a news release to the media. Everett Gillison, Nutter's chief of staff, said the six people who answer the phone line are the "nerve center for the city," answering calls only from city employees and elected officials.
NEWS
December 24, 2002 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a former operations manager for United Parcel Service, Victor N. Richard III knows how painful it is to maintain fiscal responsibility. Richard, the city's Recreation Department director, is faced with a new challenge: a 5 percent budget cut directed by Mayor Street for next year. And with a potential $612 million shortfall by 2007 looming, department leaders are huddling with the Street administration to gauge how best to meet budget realities without disrupting city services.
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