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NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
In West Philadelphia, Initial USA closed its commercial laundry last month because demand for its tablecloth and uniform service had plummeted. Gone: 146 jobs. In Center City, LTK Consulting Services Inc. packed up its engineering- design offices earlier this year and became the first tenant in a new office complex in Blue Bell. Gone: 35 jobs. In South Philadelphia, the Pac-Tec division of LaFrance Corp. will shut down its plastics manufacturing operation in the next 60 days, sell its building and relocate to Sarasota, Fla. Gone: 75 jobs.
NEWS
October 29, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one Camden City positions would be eliminated, and residents would see reductions in a range of services, from garbage removal to demolition of abandoned houses, under a budget proposed to City Council last night. All City Hall departments will face 20 percent funding and workforce cuts, and the Police and Fire Departments will make 20 percent reductions in overtime under the $172.4 million budget for the fiscal year, which began in July. Last year's budget was $178 million.
NEWS
January 24, 1996 | By Craig R. McCoy and Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The message was twofold: Philadelphians should feel good about the city's financial recovery, but they should also brace for a wave of misery from federal spending cuts. In his annual budget message yesterday, Mayor Rendell pledged to keep city services at current levels, to cut wage and business taxes slightly, to avoid layoffs among city workers, and to put more money into child-welfare services. At the same time, he warned that federal cuts could cause hardships for thousands of needy Philadelphians - and leave the city powerless to help them.
NEWS
September 21, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even in the best of times, there is little wiggle room in Philadelphia's lean and unforgiving municipal budget. And these are not the best of times. Two weeks ago, the administration estimated that the sluggish economy had already put a $450 million hole in Mayor Nutter's five-year financial plan, and that was before the federal government felt it had to rescue some of the nation's biggest financial institutions. Experts say it is hard to predict how big an effect the market meltdown and faltering economy will have on City Hall's revenue, but most expect it will be more than enough to require substantial service cuts and possibly a rollback on planned tax reductions.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has become a magnet for young people in the powerhouse demographic group known as millennials, with residents ages 20 to 34 now accounting for more than a quarter of the city's population, according to a report released Wednesday. The surge from 2006 through 2012, primarily in neighborhoods surrounding Center City, has helped reverse population decline and lifted the percentage of Philadelphia's young adults into line with New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, according to "Millennials in Philadelphia" by the Pew Charitable Trusts.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
WHEN HE WAS 13, Rich Negrin saw his Cuban-activist father gunned down by anti-Castro terrorists. He held him as he died, kneeling in the street covered with his father's blood. After he became a father himself, Negrin watched his 5-year-old daughter die in 2006 after a lifelong battle with an incurable neuromuscular disease that devastated her ability to breathe. Every day, the memory of his father and his daughter inspires the city's powerful managing director to reach out to its least powerful residents, and try to help.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
CITY CONTROLLER Alan Butkovitz took a serious shot at Mayor Nutter's legacy yesterday, accusing him of running a "VIP hot line" for the well-connected to call round-the-clock for city services. For Nutter, who ran for the city's top office in 2007 promising to provide equal access to all city services, that could not stand. His staff quickly pushed back, saying Butkovitz didn't bother to learn the facts before issuing a news release to the media. Everett Gillison, Nutter's chief of staff, said the six people who answer the phone line are the "nerve center for the city," answering calls only from city employees and elected officials.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie made an obscure service famous when he urged people in need of social services to call the 211 hotline. In Philadelphia, that gubernatorial endorsement only drove home the absence of a similar service across the river from New Jersey. But on Monday, officials with the United Way here announced the launch of a 211 hotline for the five-county Philadelphia area. Jill Michael, president and chief executive of the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, said the current economic climate and recent nearby crises such as Sandy prompted the Pennsylvania United Way to finally fund the service.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania, with its Ivy League pedigree and large health system, is one of the nation's most prestigious colleges and is Philadelphia's largest private employer. With a $6 billion-plus budget, a $7.7 billion endowment, and a recently completed $4.3 billion fund-raising campaign, it's also arguably wealthy. But Penn, like other nonprofits in the city, is largely exempt from paying property taxes on its West Philadelphia campus. The Philadelphia School District's financial crisis has yielded a renewed cry from some corners for Penn, Drexel and La Salle Universities, and other colleges and nonprofits to make payments to the city - known as Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOTs - as they did when Ed Rendell was mayor and the city needed every penny.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
How do you comfort a family that's suffered an unspeakable loss? Gloria Guard wondered that as she stood outside Families Forward, the West Philadelphia shelter that was home the 7-year-old boy who died Wednesday after falling ill at Jackson Elementary. "We are devastated," said Guard, the shelter's director. "We are trying our best to support this family, any way that we can. We are working with other families at the shelter to try to get them through this, one teeny step at a time.
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