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NEWS
March 13, 1991 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Sen. Frank A. Salvatore has introduced a bill he acknowledges won't pass, doesn't have a prayer, is dead in the water. But he has a good reason for introducing it - he doesn't want anyone to steal it from him. The legislation isn't anything new. It would allow Northeast Philadelphia to secede from the city and become its own county. Salvatore has in previous years suggested the name Liberty County. The bill has been introduced in the past, and it has died in the past. And, Salvatore and others agree, it will keep on dying.
NEWS
April 10, 2009
OUR city has drug dealers on just about every corner. Police are being killed on a regular basis. City services are just about null and void, and we have no budget to speak of. So what's our City Council (all paid more than $100,000) doing? Making sure our menus are labeled. Now that I know how many calories are in a Big Mac, I really feel safe and secure. George Madden, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCIL yesterday passed a $4.5 billion operating budget for next year, complete with a smorgasbord of bills out of Council, closing out the final session before its 12-week summer sabbatical. Council approved borrowing $27 million to help the school district with its needs for the current fiscal year, and Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown introduced a bill that asks to borrow an additional $30 million to ease next year's funding fix. Brown says the loan would be covered by the reimbursement from the extension of the sales tax. Councilman Jim Kenney prevailed with his controversial but veto-proof Small Amount of Marijuana bill, which amends the Philadelphia Code to create a civil penalty for possessing an ounce or less of weed, punishable by a $25 fine.
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The furniture has been rearranged, and new decorations adorn the walls and bookshelves of Room 312 in City Hall. Former State Rep. Ed Neilson is officially moved into his new Philadelphia City Council office and is preparing for the start of the Council session next month. He is making use of the quiet time this week to prepare his new office, get up to speed on issues, and tour various city neighborhoods. Neilson, a Democrat and former political director of Electricians Local 98, was sworn in this month to finish Bill Green's at-large City Council term.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Now that Detroit has filed for bankruptcy, will other financially challenged big cities follow Motown to U.S. Bankruptcy Court to escape some of what they owe? Maybe, but Philadelphia is unlikely to be one of them. Michigan officials wanted their biggest city to go bankrupt. They expect this will enable the city to trim what it has to pay investors who own city bonds, retired police who collect city pensions, and other creditors. "Michigan's antipathy for bondholders is startling," said Matt Fabian, managing director of Massachusetts-based Municipal Market Advisors.
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | Michael Nutter
Dear Aaron and Laura, This is a great issue that you've raised. We need to change the relationship between public officials and the people they serve. Philadelphians make an investment in their city through tax dollars, and they expect a return on that investment in the form of high-quality city services. City government must be in the business of providing superior customer service to the people of Philadelphia. If I am elected mayor, we will develop a customer-service training program for all public employees, making public satisfaction with city services a priority.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
WHY IS IT that every time the mayors or Council members write a letter or talk to the media, they all talk about cutting city services, having to raise taxes, having taxpayers tighten our belts, but no one mentions cutting their huge budgets? I hope voters remember when they come up for re-election. Here's a ballot question: "Shall the City of Philadelphia abolish half the Council seats and all their perks in order to save the taxpayer's money to help reduce our property-tax increase and keep police and fire on the streets?"
NEWS
February 17, 2009
I READ where Mayor Nutter had a 71 percent approval job rating. Is that true? Could it have been just 71 people total? With all the cutbacks in the fire department, libraries and other city services, and doubling the parking-meter rates, how many people would give him a positive approval rating? All he has done is give employers of ex-cons city tax credits and get ex-cons jobs at Goodwill. Could the ex-cons make up 71 percent of the people? Mayer Krain, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 16, 1987
The city is decaying, make no mistake about it. All we have to do is look around. Consider the loud-mouth and defensive-looking members of City Council whose names immediately come to mind. Think about the corrupt judges and the farce called a Gas Commission. Think about the city services we're not getting. Call City Hall and you're exceptionally lucky if you get satisfaction. It's pretty bad when these civil servants think we work for them, rather than the other way around.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
Saying he wanted to provide better service to Philadelphia's growing immigrant population, Mayor Nutter signed an executive order Thursday establishing the Mayor's Office of Immigrant and Multi-Cultural Affairs. The office will seek to improve access to city services for people whose English is limited. It also will help develop economic opportunities and educational resources. Nutter named Jennifer Rodriguez executive director of the office. She will be paid $100,000. Fernando Treviño-Martínez will serve as deputy director and will be paid $90,000.
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