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NEWS
February 28, 2014
After five contentious years, Mayor Nutter has reached a tentative agreement with the city's white-collar workers that strikes a balance between fairness to employees and cost control for taxpayers. Nutter stuck to his plan to begin stabilizing pension and health-care funds by requiring increased contributions from workers. The employees' new costs would be partly offset by a bonus and modest raises. Both the administration and the 4,000-member American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees District Council 47 can claim victory on an agreement that should serve as a model for other city labor deals.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
It's been said that you can't get to heaven on the Frankford El. After midnight, though, you can't even get to 15th Street. Though SEPTA officials are powerless to address the first fact, they're right to reconsider service during the wee hours, which would promote more use of a valuable public asset and encourage healthy trends toward a round-the-clock repopulation of the city. SEPTA officials told The Inquirer last week that they are pondering a pilot extension of service on the Market-Frankford and Broad Street lines until 3 a.m. on Friday and Saturday nights, starting this summer.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jamie Timmons looked out her window Tuesday morning and saw snow starting to accumulate on the street, she knew to take an overnight bag to work. Good thing she did. As a 311 call agent for the City of Philadelphia, Timmons and her colleagues were about to work round the clock from 8 a.m. Tuesday through Wednesday afternoon or even to midnight, taking calls on everything from trash pickup to requests for plowing and salting on city streets. The 26-person crew, tucked inside a first-floor office in City Hall, received the city "mandate" at 11 a.m. Tuesday that it would be going into an emergency 24/7 operation.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has become a magnet for young people in the powerhouse demographic group known as millennials, with residents ages 20 to 34 now accounting for more than a quarter of the city's population, according to a report released Wednesday. The surge from 2006 through 2012, primarily in neighborhoods surrounding Center City, has helped reverse population decline and lifted the percentage of Philadelphia's young adults into line with New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, according to "Millennials in Philadelphia" by the Pew Charitable Trusts.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ONE OF THE city's savviest money men says the city could save millions by trimming the fat from the more than 10 million square feet of office space the city owns and leases. Tom Knox, chairman of the Mayor's Task Force on City-owned Facilities, and Mayor Nutter yesterday presented the task force's report finding the city could save as much as $121 million over five years by better managing its unused office space. "This is real, serious money," Nutter said. "This report joins a growing body of work . . . that urges the city to become more data-driven and begin tracking all the costs of maintenance and operations facilities, citywide.
NEWS
September 27, 2013
I COULDN'T help but read your article on Philly gambling and "all there is to know" about the six proposals that want to make Philly a new home for their casino, and wonder when you say "Learn more about the 6 proposals" if you are really being honest. For each proposal, you gave us insight on "the bidder," "the backers" and "the connected," but what I think is the most important information that you forgot to provide was: "The opposition. " What I am trying to say is, how about a story on those (and there are a lot of them)
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania, with its Ivy League pedigree and large health system, is one of the nation's most prestigious colleges and is Philadelphia's largest private employer. With a $6 billion-plus budget, a $7.7 billion endowment, and a recently completed $4.3 billion fund-raising campaign, it's also arguably wealthy. But Penn, like other nonprofits in the city, is largely exempt from paying property taxes on its West Philadelphia campus. The Philadelphia School District's financial crisis has yielded a renewed cry from some corners for Penn, Drexel and La Salle Universities, and other colleges and nonprofits to make payments to the city - known as Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOTs - as they did when Ed Rendell was mayor and the city needed every penny.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Bob Brady wants to bring the Democratic National Convention - a huge economic boon, but also a complicated, expensive event - to Philadelphia for the first time since 1948. Brady, the city's Democratic Party boss, convened a group of the region's political, labor, and other leaders Wednesday morning at the Union League to discuss the effort. Notably absent from the gathering was Mayor Nutter, who later expressed his "enthusiasm about the possibility and the prospect of the city hosting another national party convention.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Now that Detroit has filed for bankruptcy, will other financially challenged big cities follow Motown to U.S. Bankruptcy Court to escape some of what they owe? Maybe, but Philadelphia is unlikely to be one of them. Michigan officials wanted their biggest city to go bankrupt. They expect this will enable the city to trim what it has to pay investors who own city bonds, retired police who collect city pensions, and other creditors. "Michigan's antipathy for bondholders is startling," said Matt Fabian, managing director of Massachusetts-based Municipal Market Advisors.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
Coroner: Teen in Asiana crash killed by vehicle SAN MATEO, Calif. - As the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 burned, Ye Meng Yuan was lying on the ground just 30 feet away, buried by the firefighting foam rescue workers were spraying to douse the flames. No one knows exactly how the 16-year-old Chinese student got to that spot, but officials say one thing is clear now: She somehow survived the crash. And in the chaotic moments that followed - flames devouring the fuselage, those aboard escaping by emergency slides, flight attendants frantically cutting away seat belts to free passengers - a fire truck ran over Yuan, killing her. The new details - released yesterday by the coroner's office - compounded the tragedy for her family and confirmed the growing suspicions that emergency workers have had since soon after the July 6 crash: One of the three who died did so by rescuers' actions.
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