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NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, the City of Chicago decided to create a website, tracking the live locations of its snowplows as they moved through the city after storms. "We just wanted to counter this idea that snowplows go to the aldermen's streets first, or they're just hanging out at McDonald's," said Chicago's chief technology officer, John Tolva. The website broke all of their tracking records "instantly," Tolva recalled Thursday at the Mayors' Innovation Summit at the Westin Hotel on South 17th Street.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Making no reference to protesters outside the Westin Hotel, Mayor Nutter welcomed 32 mayors and more than 200 other municipal officials Thursday to a three-day conference on innovation in city got government. The "Mayors' Innovation Summit," cosponsored by the city, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and Temple University's Fox School of Business, is designed to let cities share ideas and accomplishments in using technology to improve city services. In opening remarks, Nutter touted some of his administration's own steps, including an open data initiative to share government data with the public, a 311 smartphone application for citizens to report problems and ask questions of city government, and creation of an Office of New Urban Mechanics to try to spur innovation throughout city departments.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Corey Williams, Associated Press
DETROIT - Detroit may be broke but it will soon have a first-rate motor pool, featuring 23 new ambulances and a fleet of 100 new police cars. Some city parks also are getting tender loving care. New fruit trees and shrubs have been planted, and mowing crews are beginning to make the rounds to keep the green spaces tidy. One of the surprising things about Detroit's descent toward insolvency - so dire that a state-appointed emergency manager recently took over - is that public services haven't collapsed as completely as some might have expected.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
Saying he wanted to provide better service to Philadelphia's growing immigrant population, Mayor Nutter signed an executive order Thursday establishing the Mayor's Office of Immigrant and Multi-Cultural Affairs. The office will seek to improve access to city services for people whose English is limited. It also will help develop economic opportunities and educational resources. Nutter named Jennifer Rodriguez executive director of the office. She will be paid $100,000. Fernando Treviño-Martínez will serve as deputy director and will be paid $90,000.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie made an obscure service famous when he urged people in need of social services to call the 211 hotline. In Philadelphia, that gubernatorial endorsement only drove home the absence of a similar service across the river from New Jersey. But on Monday, officials with the United Way here announced the launch of a 211 hotline for the five-county Philadelphia area. Jill Michal, president and chief executive of the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, said the current economic climate and recent nearby crises such as Sandy prompted the Pennsylvania United Way to finally fund the service.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
PARX CASINO and New Penn Financial have signed on as the two major sponsors for Philadelphia's new professional-cycling race, together pledging $700,000 for this year's race and the next. U.S. Rep. Bob Brady announced Thursday that the Parx Casino Philly Cycling Classic had secured enough funds to fill the gap left after the Philadelphia International Cycling Championship was canceled due to financial troubles. Parx has promised $500,000, he said, while Penn, a national mortgage-lending firm, signed on for an additional $200,000.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Just as dozens of nearly winded cyclists make one last push up Manayunk's steep hill nicknamed The Wall during the annual Philadelphia International Cycling Championship, city leaders must try harder to revive professional bike racing in the city by next year. There's no doubt that cycling enthusiasts, merchants along the racers' route, and officials in the city's visitor industry will miss the June 2 race, now cancelled by event organizers after the loss of the title sponsor that had provided the lion's share of funding.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MANAGERS of the famous Philadelphia International Cycling Championship owe the city big bucks from last year's race, including costs for cops and cleanup, according to the event's founder and city officials. Pro Cycling Tour announced Monday that it was canceling the annual race in Manayunk - initially scheduled for June 2 - due to rising costs and a loss in sponsorship. The group still owes $321,000 for the 2012 race, for traffic control, sanitation, police and emergency management, Fairmount Park event support and food-service inspection, said mayoral spokesman Mark McDonald.
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