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NEWS
June 20, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BONNIE WELLER
Sharde Wood, 11, seeks relief with a mini-fan while waiting with her brother Benton, 5, on Germantown Avenue. Their partents were doing some banking. Yesterday, humidity and a high of 86 made for a steamy day. More of the same is in this weekend's forecast, along with a thunderstorm.
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roadway gridlock around Philadelphia Friday evening was on the mind of Twitter user Savannah Witkus. "Philly traffic tonight makes me want to stab my eyes with a spork," she wrote at 6 p.m. from her @savannahwitkus account. Police said the highways were crowded with high seasonal volume - people leaving work and going holiday shopping. There were residual delays from the departure of President Obama from Philadelphia during the afternoon; police temporarily shut roads his motorcade traveled.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first of an anticipated 150 wheelchair-accessible taxis was put into service in Philadelphia Thursday, the Philadelphia Parking Authority said. Starting with one now, PPA's goal is to have 61 wheelchair-friendly cabs on the street by the end of this year. The target date for 150 cabs is 2021. The authority started trying sell medallions for wheelchair cabs for $475,000 each last October, but was forced to dramatically cut the price when no buyers emerged amid the uncertainty created by competition from ride-share operators such as Uber and Lyft.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
YOU KNOW THOSE pesky dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles that zip around, weaving through traffic in the warmer months, making any drive through some Philadelphia neighborhoods a nightmare? Now there are about three dozen fewer of them on the streets, thanks to a daylong undercover bust around the city yesterday by Major Crimes Unit cops and other officers who are part of a detail aimed at getting the illegal vehicles off city streets. As yesterday's sting neared its end about 7 p.m., Chief Inspector Dennis Wilson, of Regional Operations Command North, said officers had seized 34 dirt bikes and ATVs.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THINKING ABOUT parking your car in that bike lane? Don't do it. It'll cost you. City Council approved the "Complete Streets" bill Thursday that makes a series of changes to the traffic code for bicyclists and motorists, stressing consideration for all who share the road. For drivers, violations include parking a vehicle in a bike lane and opening a car door against oncoming traffic, a potential hazard to cyclists. For bikers, violations include running a redlight, riding on the sidewalk, or parking a bike in the street (unless it's against the curb or in a designated parking space.)
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phone apps that give heightened meaning to the phrase "prized parking space" are about to face pushback from the city. City Council's Streets and Services Committee on Wednesday advanced a bill aimed at shutting down phone apps that allow drivers to bid on and sell public parking spots. The bill amends the city's parking regulations to make it illegal to sell, lease, or reserve public parking spots. Boston, San Francisco, and Los Angeles have introduced or passed similar ordinances after apps such as Monkey Parking and Haystack started becoming popular in those cities, said Councilman William Greenlee, who sponsored the bill.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Riding the Schuylkill River Trail is like taking a trip by rail. Just add the sweat. Over its 23 miles (and growing), the paved bike path travels from woods to suburbia, town to city, meandering in and out of eyesight of the river that at one time symbolized great industrial power. The trail largely follows old rail lines, which themselves followed old canals dug to haul coal to port. Even when the river is hidden from view, that loading-dock feeling comes from cycling past a steel mill and sewage treatment plant, big construction projects and crumbling warehouses.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By DANA DiFILIPPO & JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writers
THE DIRT-BIKERS and ATV four-wheelers gathered under a tree in Hunting Park one recent Sunday, the roar of their engines as much a part of the sunny scene as the ballplayers and picnickers and the guy selling barbecued chicken on skewers. As more and more riders arrived, they greeted each other with hugs and handshakes, admiring the modifications they made to their bikes and swapping stories about getaways, crashes and infamous rides, like Pupo's legendary 12-mile wheelie up I-95 that helped Philly "defeat" Baltimore in a friendly contest of skills.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben Bryant's love for Philadelphia's public pools started on a sweltering summer day. He slogged along South Street when people emerged from a brick facade at 26th Street that hides O'Connor Pool. They looked happy and refreshed. He was curious. The 33-year-old urban planner discovered Philadelphia boasted more outdoor public pools per capita than any other city in the country. Bryant started using Ridgeway Pool at 13th and Christian Streets with his son. He marveled at the recent rise of other public spaces in Philadelphia, and always had an idea for improving the city's pools.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer
JERMAINE Alexander learned to ride a dirt bike before he could write or tie his shoes. "Maine" was 5, and he would ride his bicycle only if he smashed tin cans in the wheels to mimic the dirt-bike growl. So his uncle took him to the park to teach him to ride the real thing. When he was a teenager and would hear one roar by on the streets outside, he'd stampede to the window to see who was riding what. He became so adept at fixing them that he could transform scraps of junkers into bikes that, though not beautiful, still flew fast as fireworks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News
If you are a Master-of-the-Universe developer like Philly's Bart Blatstein, it's nothing to embark on a spur-of-the-moment jaunt to Nashville and Austin, Texas, and return from the two-night westward excursion with a crystalized concept for a long-struggling Atlantic City property you recently acquired. That, in a nutshell, is the story of T Street, the first phase of The Playground, the ocean-straddling entertainment complex that Blatstein and his partner, acclaimed casino architect Paul Steelman, believe represents a crucial step forward in Atlantic City's post-casino-industry-collapse era. It's located on the site of what was most recently the failed Pier Shops at Caesars, a mostly high-end shopping mall that was a victim of, among other things, Atlantic City's devastation from legal gambling in neighboring states.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a pedestrian killed by a Ride the Ducks vehicle in May filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the tour boat's operator, its manufacturer, and the City of Philadelphia. The complaint alleges that the accident that killed Elizabeth Karnicki, 68, at 11th and Arch Streets on May 10 was due in part to "huge blind spots" inherent in the amphibious vehicles that operate on city streets and on the water. The suit came on the fifth anniversary of the accident that killed two Hungarian tourists when the duck was hit by a barge on the Delaware River.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first of an anticipated 150 wheelchair-accessible taxis was put into service in Philadelphia Thursday, the Philadelphia Parking Authority said. Starting with one now, PPA's goal is to have 61 wheelchair-friendly cabs on the street by the end of this year. The target date for 150 cabs is 2021. The authority started trying sell medallions for wheelchair cabs for $475,000 each last October, but was forced to dramatically cut the price when no buyers emerged amid the uncertainty created by competition from ride-share operators such as Uber and Lyft.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben Bryant's love for Philadelphia's public pools started on a sweltering summer day. He slogged along South Street when people emerged from a brick facade at 26th Street that hides O'Connor Pool. They looked happy and refreshed. He was curious. The 33-year-old urban planner discovered Philadelphia boasted more outdoor public pools per capita than any other city in the country. Bryant started using Ridgeway Pool at 13th and Christian Streets with his son. He marveled at the recent rise of other public spaces in Philadelphia, and always had an idea for improving the city's pools.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A Philadelphia taxi ride used to be one of those luxurious indulgences where you could escape, however briefly, from your over-scheduled life and spend a few precious minutes staring out the window, lost in thought. Now every trip begins with a backseat television screen laying claim to your eyeballs. At least you still have the option of hitting the off button. If a bill sponsored by Councilman Mark Squilla is put to a final vote later this month, the mere act of walking through the streets of Center City will become a lot like a cab ride, but without the off button.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It may be time to reassess your priorities when a failure to take care of supposedly less important issues is affecting your primary goal. Take the "broken windows" approach to policing, which calls for minor crimes such as littering or disturbing the peace to be swiftly and appropriately punished, sending the message that no degree of criminality will be tolerated. Unfortunately, that hasn't been the way traffic violations have been handled in Philadelphia. Consequently, too many dangerous drivers who at least should have had their licenses taken away are still on the road, and other people have died as a result.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phone apps that give heightened meaning to the phrase "prized parking space" are about to face pushback from the city. City Council's Streets and Services Committee on Wednesday advanced a bill aimed at shutting down phone apps that allow drivers to bid on and sell public parking spots. The bill amends the city's parking regulations to make it illegal to sell, lease, or reserve public parking spots. Boston, San Francisco, and Los Angeles have introduced or passed similar ordinances after apps such as Monkey Parking and Haystack started becoming popular in those cities, said Councilman William Greenlee, who sponsored the bill.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
YOU KNOW THOSE pesky dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles that zip around, weaving through traffic in the warmer months, making any drive through some Philadelphia neighborhoods a nightmare? Now there are about three dozen fewer of them on the streets, thanks to a daylong undercover bust around the city yesterday by Major Crimes Unit cops and other officers who are part of a detail aimed at getting the illegal vehicles off city streets. As yesterday's sting neared its end about 7 p.m., Chief Inspector Dennis Wilson, of Regional Operations Command North, said officers had seized 34 dirt bikes and ATVs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Unlike so many of Philadelphia's polar-vortex-ravaged streets, the stretch of 22d between Spring Garden Street and Fairmount Avenue is as smooth and dark as a chocolate bar. It was repaved in August, and yet no white lines ruffle its silky surface. The way things are going, there won't be any for a long time. Perhaps if the Streets Department had simply presented the roadwork as an effort to calm traffic, reduce crashes, and make the street safer for pedestrians, those stripes and glyphs would have been painted on long ago. Instead, the department's traffic engineers made the mistake of mentioning the B-word - as in bike lane - and now the worthy improvement project is ensnared in the web of City Council politics.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Anton Moore, engaging people through social media, word of mouth, and street-corner conversation has been a way of building bridges between people and communities. Concerned about violence this year between young men in his South Philadelphia community and those of Southwest Philadelphia, Moore, 28, thought of bridges. "What I wanted to do was open the dialogue up," Moore said last week, "to bring leaders together to build a rapport and get on a first-name basis so that we could work together.
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