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NEWS
June 20, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BONNIE WELLER
Sharde Wood, 11, seeks relief with a mini-fan while waiting with her brother Benton, 5, on Germantown Avenue. Their partents were doing some banking. Yesterday, humidity and a high of 86 made for a steamy day. More of the same is in this weekend's forecast, along with a thunderstorm.
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roadway gridlock around Philadelphia Friday evening was on the mind of Twitter user Savannah Witkus. "Philly traffic tonight makes me want to stab my eyes with a spork," she wrote at 6 p.m. from her @savannahwitkus account. Police said the highways were crowded with high seasonal volume - people leaving work and going holiday shopping. There were residual delays from the departure of President Obama from Philadelphia during the afternoon; police temporarily shut roads his motorcade traveled.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first of an anticipated 150 wheelchair-accessible taxis was put into service in Philadelphia Thursday, the Philadelphia Parking Authority said. Starting with one now, PPA's goal is to have 61 wheelchair-friendly cabs on the street by the end of this year. The target date for 150 cabs is 2021. The authority started trying sell medallions for wheelchair cabs for $475,000 each last October, but was forced to dramatically cut the price when no buyers emerged amid the uncertainty created by competition from ride-share operators such as Uber and Lyft.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THINKING ABOUT parking your car in that bike lane? Don't do it. It'll cost you. City Council approved the "Complete Streets" bill Thursday that makes a series of changes to the traffic code for bicyclists and motorists, stressing consideration for all who share the road. For drivers, violations include parking a vehicle in a bike lane and opening a car door against oncoming traffic, a potential hazard to cyclists. For bikers, violations include running a redlight, riding on the sidewalk, or parking a bike in the street (unless it's against the curb or in a designated parking space.)
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
YOU KNOW THOSE pesky dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles that zip around, weaving through traffic in the warmer months, making any drive through some Philadelphia neighborhoods a nightmare? Now there are about three dozen fewer of them on the streets, thanks to a daylong undercover bust around the city yesterday by Major Crimes Unit cops and other officers who are part of a detail aimed at getting the illegal vehicles off city streets. As yesterday's sting neared its end about 7 p.m., Chief Inspector Dennis Wilson, of Regional Operations Command North, said officers had seized 34 dirt bikes and ATVs.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phone apps that give heightened meaning to the phrase "prized parking space" are about to face pushback from the city. City Council's Streets and Services Committee on Wednesday advanced a bill aimed at shutting down phone apps that allow drivers to bid on and sell public parking spots. The bill amends the city's parking regulations to make it illegal to sell, lease, or reserve public parking spots. Boston, San Francisco, and Los Angeles have introduced or passed similar ordinances after apps such as Monkey Parking and Haystack started becoming popular in those cities, said Councilman William Greenlee, who sponsored the bill.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By DANA DiFILIPPO & JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writers
THE DIRT-BIKERS and ATV four-wheelers gathered under a tree in Hunting Park one recent Sunday, the roar of their engines as much a part of the sunny scene as the ballplayers and picnickers and the guy selling barbecued chicken on skewers. As more and more riders arrived, they greeted each other with hugs and handshakes, admiring the modifications they made to their bikes and swapping stories about getaways, crashes and infamous rides, like Pupo's legendary 12-mile wheelie up I-95 that helped Philly "defeat" Baltimore in a friendly contest of skills.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Riding the Schuylkill River Trail is like taking a trip by rail. Just add the sweat. Over its 23 miles (and growing), the paved bike path travels from woods to suburbia, town to city, meandering in and out of eyesight of the river that at one time symbolized great industrial power. The trail largely follows old rail lines, which themselves followed old canals dug to haul coal to port. Even when the river is hidden from view, that loading-dock feeling comes from cycling past a steel mill and sewage treatment plant, big construction projects and crumbling warehouses.
NEWS
May 10, 2016
To celebrate the first-year success of Indego, Philadelphia's bike-sharing program, its staff recently donned T-shirts sporting the slogan "Inbudget, Incontrol, Independent, Inshape. " Given the soaring popularity of Indego, which saw riders straddle its distinctive teal bicycles more than 420,000 times last year, the day may come when "In Every Zip Code" will be added to that list. But for that to happen, Indego's scope, ambition - and, yes, funding - will have to grow too. It was evident at Indego's first birthday celebration - which took place on the Race Street Pier, complete with a cake-cutting by Mayor Kenney - that there is substantial demand for a bike-sharing system that reaches deeper into city neighborhoods.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AS THE WEATHER warms, the sounds of summer are starting: birds singing, the ping of baseballs hitting bats, the chatter of children frolicking outdoors - and the roar of dirt bikes and ATVs tearing around city streets and parks. That last urban bane already has prompted Philadelphia police to issue their annual appeal to citizens: They want fans of four-wheelers and dirt bikes to stay off public property and residents to report scofflaws. "These vehicles are not legal to drive on the city streets.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2016
To celebrate the first-year success of Indego, Philadelphia's bike-sharing program, its staff recently donned T-shirts sporting the slogan "Inbudget, Incontrol, Independent, Inshape. " Given the soaring popularity of Indego, which saw riders straddle its distinctive teal bicycles more than 420,000 times last year, the day may come when "In Every Zip Code" will be added to that list. But for that to happen, Indego's scope, ambition - and, yes, funding - will have to grow too. It was evident at Indego's first birthday celebration - which took place on the Race Street Pier, complete with a cake-cutting by Mayor Kenney - that there is substantial demand for a bike-sharing system that reaches deeper into city neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By James Sikorski Jr
VISION ZERO, Complete Streets, Smart Growth or any other name it is called is an attack upon drivers. Vision Zero started in Sweden as an approach to minimizing traffic accidents and fatalities, including cars hitting bicyclists and pedestrians. This initiative is being heavily pushed by the Kenney administration and the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. Basically, the initiative is designed to make life so miserable that people will not drive. The speed-camera aspect is the most outrageous one. Where these are used, the speed limits are artificially low and tickets go out to drivers just barely above the speed limit.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
By Andrew Stober Last week, a woman and her two children, one 5 years old and the other an infant, were struck and injured in a hit-and-run while crossing a street around the corner from my home in South Philadelphia. On the same day, the Kenney administration announced plans to appoint a "complete streets commissioner. " In a single day, then, the city had seen a brutal example of its traffic violence crisis as well as some hope for a solution. Our neighbors and children are hit by vehicles while crossing Philadelphia's streets with alarming frequency.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
A powerful ally has joined the region's battle to move and remove some of the trillion pounds of snow that has descended upon Philadelphia and its neighboring counties during the weekend: Nature. As signs of normality emerged from all those white mounds on Tuesday, afternoon temperatures well into the 40s subtly trimmed back snowbanks on the region's roads. Philadelphia reported 80 percent of its streets were passable. Nearly every school that remained closed was preparing to open Wednesday.
NEWS
January 27, 2016
A look at the city's response to the storm this weekend: 1,800 miles of city streets plowed. 10,000 tons of salt used. 390 plows in operation. 1,600 city workers in Streets, Office of Emergency Management, and other offices. 23,000 police and fire responses over the weekend. 34 percent increase in fire and EMS calls. 102 homeless provided supportive services. 2,000 individuals in city shelters. 9,000 calls to the city's 311 center.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a car hits another car, a person or a bike, don't call it an accident . That was the refrain at a conference Thursday about making Philadelphia's streets safer. "This is not an accident ," said Denise Goren, director of the Mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities, of automobile crashes during one of the daylong event's panel discussions. "What we're talking about here are crashes we can avoid. " Vision Zero Philadelphia, hosted by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, brought together city planners, elected officials, cops and staff from nonprofits.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite early assurances that the World Meeting of Families would pay all costs for the papal visit, the city said Wednesday that taxpayer dollars would cover nearly half the costs related to the event - about $8 million. The city spent $17 million on Pope Francis' visit in late September, according to the city's budget director, most of it to pay for police and fire services. The city has sent a bill to the World Meeting seeking nearly $9 million. City Controller Alan Butkovitz - a frequent critic of Mayor Nutter's - said the amount being billed to the World Meeting was far below his expectations.
NEWS
October 14, 2015
WHO OWNS city streets? If it's those who live in the city, we should all get a say. Does anyone get a veto? I'll answer that a little later. The issue of who owns city streets arose after the Papal Lockdown emptied our downtown core of vehicles. No citizen had a say. The onetime "Francis Festival Grounds" gave some people the giddy joy of riding their bikes in the streets, or walking in them, or rolling in them, without cars. A fair reading of what some had to say seemed like it was a psychosexual or religious experience.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Michael A. Nutter
In Philadelphia's long history, there's not been an event that so captivated a national and global audience of millions as the awe-inspiring visit of Pope Francis. For two days, an eternity in the continuous news cycle of 21st-century media, this humble religious man with an entrancing smile was at the center of massive public events with the city's stunning streetscape framing his every move. Spectators and viewers were mesmerized. For this city and region, the publicity and brand exposure, if you will, is undoubtedly beyond calculation.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Jake Liefer  the most unexpected perk of the papal visit weekend happened not on the Parkway or at Independence Hall, but in the serene streets of the city, where he got to take his 1-year-old daughter with him on their first bicycle ride together. "I felt safe riding on these open streets with pedestrians and other bike riders and without having to worry about cars," the Point Breeze resident said. "It was so joyful without cars honking, engines revving. " There was also the yogi striking warrior poses on the middle of Race Street; the three friends lying on their stomachs at Broad and Locust smiling for a picture; and all the parents, who, like Liefer , took their children out to play in city streets typically too congested for such activities.
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