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City Treasurer

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NEWS
April 9, 1986 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The appointments of Eric H. Pookrum as city treasurer and Daniel M. Stone as deputy commissioner for human services were announced by Mayor Goode yesterday during swearing-in ceremonies at City Hall. Pookrum, 32, who had served for the last two years as deputy city treasurer in charge of public finance, assumed the $55,000-a-year treasurer's position last month. He is responsible for selling city bonds, investing city funds and issuing city payments and paychecks. He replaces Warren L. Eisenberg, who has been reassigned as a deputy finance director and placed in charge of a new unit designed to improve management services across city government.
NEWS
February 23, 2005 | By Emilie Lounsberry and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's largest corruption trial in years opened yesterday with three defense lawyers ridiculing the prosecution's case and saying FBI agents had urged one banker to "wear a wire . . . to save their failing investigation. " While Assistant U.S. Attorney Joan L. Markman portrayed defendant Corey Kemp as a corrupt city official who accepted cash and gifts, defense attorney L. George Parry painted a more sympathetic portrait of the former treasurer as a hapless figure who had no authority and broke no laws.
NEWS
December 7, 2003 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Besides bugging Mayor Street's office, the FBI tapped the office phones of the city treasurer and two of the mayor's most influential political allies. Federal authorities placed wiretaps on the phones of Center City power broker Ronald A. White; city Treasurer Corey Kemp; and Imam Shamsud-din Ali, a prominent Muslim cleric, according to court-system sources familiar with aspects of the investigation. White, 54, a top political ally of the mayor's and a major player in the city's lucrative government bond business, has emerged as a central figure in the wide-ranging inquiry that has shaken City Hall.
NEWS
August 24, 2004 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lawyer for former Philadelphia Treasurer Corey Kemp asked in federal court yesterday to be relieved of his duties in the city corruption case, citing other commitments and his client's inability to pay. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Baylson said he would grant defense attorney Michael McGovern's request and appoint new counsel tomorrow, assuming Kemp does not find another lawyer on his own by then. Kemp was indicted two months ago on charges that he allowed politically connected lawyer Ronald A. White and others to deprive the taxpayers of Kemp's "honest services as treasurer.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, Corey Kemp was bright, gregarious, good with people and with numbers. As Philadelphia treasurer, he was also surpassingly greedy, the federal pay-to-play indictment alleged yesterday. In return for steering hundreds of thousands of dollars in city work to uberlawyer Ronald A. White, the indictment says Kemp collected $10,000 in payments, a $10,350 deck on his house, a trip to the Super Bowl and other sporting events - even an excursion on a private jet as he drank champagne and nibbled hors d'oeuvres.
NEWS
March 19, 2005 | By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Corey Kemp's ex-girlfriend gave jurors in the City Hall pay-to-play trial yesterday a glimpse of the supposed high life Kemp lived when he was city treasurer. Ingrid McDaniels testified about chartered planes, fancy hotel suites, and concerts she experienced with Kemp during the first six months of 2003. McDaniels, who did not know Kemp was married when she met him through an Internet dating service, testified for about a half-hour. Prosecutors said they called her to try to show that most of those riches were paid for by power broker Ronald A. White, the late bond lawyer who authorities say corrupted Kemp.
NEWS
March 12, 1996 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Board of Education yesterday approved City Treasurer Clarence D. "Clay" Armbrister to succeed Irvin R. Davis as managing director for the school district's finances - arguably the system's second most important job and, considering the district's money troubles, surely one of the most difficult. Armbrister, 38, is a public-finance expert and former partner in the law firm of Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul. The board acted on the recommendation of Superintendent David Hornbeck, who said he met Armbrister a few months ago when he sought outside advice on the complex process of school bond sales.
NEWS
December 31, 1993 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell announced the appointment yesterday of Clarence D. Armbrister, a bond lawyer specializing in public finance, as city treasurer. Armbrister, 36, replaces Kathryn Engebretson, who resigned this fall to complete her doctoral dissertation before returning to the private sector. Armbrister, who will begin work as treasurer in February, has been a partner in the Philadelphia law firm of Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul since 1990, serving as bond underwriters' counsel on numerous bond offerings for state and local governments.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Chris Brennan
CITY HALL staffers and elected officials should take a moment Monday to look at their office ceilings and ponder a question: Is someone listening in on all this? Monday marks the 10th anniversary of the discovery of a FBI listening device in the ceiling of then-Mayor John Street 's City Hall office, right above his desk. If that seems like a long time ago, think of what it must feel like for Corey Kemp . Kemp, the city treasurer appointed by Street and eventually convicted on corruption charges in the probe, won't be released from prison until next May. Kemp wasn't the only person to go to jail, just the guy with the stiffest sentence.
NEWS
December 31, 1993 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
In the latest change in the top ranks of the Rendell administration, the mayor has chosen a nationally known bond lawyer to be the next city treasurer. Clarence D. "Clay" Armbrister, 36, is a partner in the Philadelphia law firm of Saul Ewing Remick and Saul, specializing in public finance. Armbrister replaces Kathy Engebretson, who resigned recently to complete a graduate degree. Armbrister's boss, J. Clayton Undercofler III, the former SEPTA board chairman, described his colleague as a nationally known expert on public finance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 22, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, Staff Writer
MY FIRST TIME was on a late winter Saturday evening. The details remain hazy. Two of my high school friends from Baltimore were at Villanova and had been telling me I needed to get up to Philadelphia to see a Big 5 doubleheader at the Palestra. I got on a bus from College Park, Md., one Friday afternoon and somehow ended up on a train out to the Main Line. The next night, the first game, a k a the prelim, was already on when we got to the Palestra. Villanova was in the second game.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For months, Nancy Winkler and Jay Bryan went out of their way not to pass by 22d and Market Streets. They lived only three blocks away, so it wasn't easy. But avoiding that corner forever would be almost impossible. When the couple did finally find themselves there in April, what they saw only deepened the sadness in their lives - a barren lot, long and narrow, strewn front to back with accumulated garbage. "It was depressing to see that people were trashing it," Bryan said.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Chris Brennan
CITY HALL staffers and elected officials should take a moment Monday to look at their office ceilings and ponder a question: Is someone listening in on all this? Monday marks the 10th anniversary of the discovery of a FBI listening device in the ceiling of then-Mayor John Street 's City Hall office, right above his desk. If that seems like a long time ago, think of what it must feel like for Corey Kemp . Kemp, the city treasurer appointed by Street and eventually convicted on corruption charges in the probe, won't be released from prison until next May. Kemp wasn't the only person to go to jail, just the guy with the stiffest sentence.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Running Philadelphia can look like a child's game. Rock, paper, scissors: After landlord Richard Basciano hired a bankrupt contractor recommended by a formerly bankrupt architect to hire a marijuana-smoking ex-offender to knock down a building on Center City's main street, a few knowledgeable and conscientious citizens - an architect, bricklayers, people capable of recognizing knuckleheads at work and dangerous structural elements threatening collapse...
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Jeff Gammage, Aubrey Whelan, and Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writers
It was an ordinary moment of commerce transformed into random catastrophe, as workers and shoppers from different backgrounds and classes died together Wednesday in a Salvation Army thrift shop. They perished after a building being demolished next door collapsed onto the store, owned by a nonprofit whose normal function is to help victims such as these in disasters such as this. Among the dead were: Two best friends from the suburbs hunting fashion bargains on a rack of second-hand skirts - one the daughter of the city treasurer, the other the daughter of a doctor.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A complex financial strategy that was supposed to save Philadelphia money on bonds it sold investors in the mid-2000s could end up costing the city up to $186 million, compared with what issuing simple fixed-rate bonds would have cost, city treasurer Nancy Winkler told City Council members at a hearing Tuesday organized by Jim Kenney (D., at-large). According to testimony from Winkler and other experts, the city arranged interest-rate swaps with Wall Street banks in exchange for up-front cash and to protect taxpayers from the risk of rising interest rates.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Susan Snyder and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Temple University, city, and School District executive has been named interim president of Girard College, officials announced Friday. Clarence D. "Clay" Armbrister, 55, will take the helm at the private boarding school in North Philadelphia on July 1. Mayor Nutter's former chief of staff, Armbrister most recently was senior vice president and chief of staff at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, a post he left after six months....
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Bridgman Churchman III, 89, of Gladwyne, a retired insurance executive, died Sunday, Nov. 20, of pneumonia at Lankenau Hospital. In 1947, Mr. Churchman joined the Guardian Life Insurance Co. in Philadelphia. He later told an Inquirer reporter, "I went into the insurance business, where literally anybody could get a job," and noted that salesmen were paid solely on commission. He told The Inquirer in 1986 that he got into management "by default," after peddling insurance door to door in Levittown.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
How Vince Fumo's prison sentence stacked up to other prominent federal corruption cases: *  Fumo, ex-South Philadelphia state senator Convicted: July 14, 2009 What He Did: Used Senate staffers as personal and political minions and defrauded two nonprofits of $2.3 million. Sentence: about 4 1/2 years *  Rick Mariano, former Philadelphia city councilman Convicted: July 13, 2006 What He Did: Took $23,000 in bribes from two businessmen in his district in exchange for official favors, and helped a developer obtain city land in exchange for $5,400 in gym fees.
NEWS
July 24, 2011
With a high-profile crackdown on two city workers over free meals and scoring TVs and other goodies through dealings with Verizon and other city contractors, Mayor Nutter reminded Philadelphia voters that he meant what he said with his 2007 campaign pledge to "throw the bums out. " By firing a top technology officer, and demoting and suspending another aide, Nutter offered a case study last week on the risks of an often too-cozy relationship between...
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