CollectionsCity University
IN THE NEWS

City University

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. House, 79, of Center City, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania who was a founder and principal investigator of a global project on leadership and organizational behavior, died of heart failure Tuesday, Nov. 1, at Hahnemann University Hospital. Dr. House joined the Wharton faculty in 1988. From 1993 to 2003, he was active with the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) research project at Wharton and he coedited three books compiled from the research.
NEWS
May 16, 2015
Hurrying to get aboard At 41, Giuseppe Piras was a jet-setting entrepreneur. His family is well-known in Ittiri, on Sardinia, an Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea. His father, Luigino, owns a cafe. Piras was a founder of an olive oil and wine cooperative, and had come to the United States to sell his wares. He typically would travel to New York by plane. He took Amtrak Train 188 because he didn't want to be late for a meeting. Minutes before boarding the train, Piras called his family back home, said Andrea Canepari, the consul general of Italy in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexandra Grilikhes, 70, who built a University of Pennsylvania library from a fledgling facility into a respected source of information, died Saturday of breast cancer at her home in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia. She also was an award-winning poet and novelist who taught at the University of the Arts. As director of Penn's Annenberg School for Communication Library from the late 1960s until she retired in the early 1990s, Ms. Grilikhes "built a real library," said Larry Gross, deputy dean of the Annenberg School.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | BY RACHEL ERLANGER, From the New York Times
A report by the Educational Testing Service finds that "students are poor writers, they do not like to write and they like it less as they go through school. " One reason students write poorly could be that so many teachers write poorly. Strunk and White, in "The Elements of Style," tell us to omit needless words and avoid elaborate and pretentious ones. The writer William Zinsser talks of stripping a sentence to its "cleanest components. " But neither the professional literature nor the meetings on the teaching of writing I attend show any concern for such matters.
NEWS
June 25, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
William W. Brickman, a retired graduate professor of education at the University of Pennsylvania and gifted linguist who spoke dozens of modern and ancient tongues, died Sunday. He was 72 and lived in Cherry Hill. Peter Bent, assistant dean at the graduate school of education at Penn, said Brickman's linguistic skills were "remarkable. " "You could sit and have a 20-minute conversation with him in German and he'd walk out the door and talk to somebody else in Polish, or Japanese, and do so quite fluently.
NEWS
October 7, 1991
IMAGINE THAT Remember Tom Laughlin of the Billy Jack movies? Now he says he wants to run for president. Can you imagine that, a has-been grade B movie actor thinking he has a chance to be president? - Jay Leno EAT THEM WITH A FOX? Alexandra Ripley has been commissioned to write "Sam," the sequel to "Green Eggs and Ham. " - Glynn Moore, Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle. LAWYER JOKE Q. What's the difference between a lawyer and a catfish? A. One's a slimy, garbage-eating nuisance . . . and the other's a fish.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER appointed a special commission yesterday to investigate the Department of Licenses & Inspections in the wake of the deadly Center City building collapse in June. City Treasurer Nancy Winkler, whose daughter Anne Bryan, 24, was one of six people killed in the collapse, had called for a blue-ribbon commission on the department. L&I was scrutinized after the collapse, in which a wall from a demolition site fell onto a Salvation Army thrift store next door, because the demolition had been approved and inspected.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After they receive their diplomas in childhood studies this month, three Rutgers-Camden students are likely to continue to face the same assumptions and questions they have for the last six years. Theirs is the study of childhood, not children per se or child psychology, and Rutgers says they are trailblazers in the first such doctoral program in North America. "Ninety-nine percent of the time, people would be, like, 'Oh, so you want to become a preschool teacher,' " said Lara Saguisag.
NEWS
June 12, 1994 | By HOUSTON A. BAKER JR
A few weeks ago, one of my more emotional colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania followed me down the great central staircase of Bennett Hall, the English Department building, lamenting: "You must be just horrified at what is happening at your alma mater. It really is a shame for you!" He was talking about historically black Howard University, situated in Washington, D.C., and founded during the 19th century by the United States Freedmen's Bureau to educate aspiring black citizens of America.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An educator from Massachusetts who says she's used to coping with shrinking budgets yesterday was named president of West Chester University, the largest in the suburbs, with nearly 12,000 students. "My challenge," said Madeleine Wing Adler, "will be to keep the university moving" despite belt-tightening in Harrisburg. Speaking to well-wishers last night, she called the university in Chester County "the jewel in the crown of the Pennsylvania system. " Adler, 51, has been vice president for academic affairs at Framingham State College, a state school near Boston with about 5,500 students, many of them commuter students - which also is the case at West Chester.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2015
Hurrying to get aboard At 41, Giuseppe Piras was a jet-setting entrepreneur. His family is well-known in Ittiri, on Sardinia, an Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea. His father, Luigino, owns a cafe. Piras was a founder of an olive oil and wine cooperative, and had come to the United States to sell his wares. He typically would travel to New York by plane. He took Amtrak Train 188 because he didn't want to be late for a meeting. Minutes before boarding the train, Piras called his family back home, said Andrea Canepari, the consul general of Italy in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
WE DON'T suppose it's been a very good month if your name is Louise Bishop. The state representative has been near the center of two separate but equally disturbing scandals: The latest is an investigation by the Daily News into an undeveloped project in Overbrook that carries her name. The Lancaster Avenue Redevelopment Corp. was funded by state and city money - at least $2 million, some of which was arranged by Bishop - to revitalize a commercial corridor, reduce blight, build homes and create jobs, starting as far back as 2001.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER appointed a special commission yesterday to investigate the Department of Licenses & Inspections in the wake of the deadly Center City building collapse in June. City Treasurer Nancy Winkler, whose daughter Anne Bryan, 24, was one of six people killed in the collapse, had called for a blue-ribbon commission on the department. L&I was scrutinized after the collapse, in which a wall from a demolition site fell onto a Salvation Army thrift store next door, because the demolition had been approved and inspected.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania, with its Ivy League pedigree and large health system, is one of the nation's most prestigious colleges and is Philadelphia's largest private employer. With a $6 billion-plus budget, a $7.7 billion endowment, and a recently completed $4.3 billion fund-raising campaign, it's also arguably wealthy. But Penn, like other nonprofits in the city, is largely exempt from paying property taxes on its West Philadelphia campus. The Philadelphia School District's financial crisis has yielded a renewed cry from some corners for Penn, Drexel and La Salle Universities, and other colleges and nonprofits to make payments to the city - known as Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOTs - as they did when Ed Rendell was mayor and the city needed every penny.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After they receive their diplomas in childhood studies this month, three Rutgers-Camden students are likely to continue to face the same assumptions and questions they have for the last six years. Theirs is the study of childhood, not children per se or child psychology, and Rutgers says they are trailblazers in the first such doctoral program in North America. "Ninety-nine percent of the time, people would be, like, 'Oh, so you want to become a preschool teacher,' " said Lara Saguisag.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. House, 79, of Center City, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania who was a founder and principal investigator of a global project on leadership and organizational behavior, died of heart failure Tuesday, Nov. 1, at Hahnemann University Hospital. Dr. House joined the Wharton faculty in 1988. From 1993 to 2003, he was active with the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) research project at Wharton and he coedited three books compiled from the research.
NEWS
May 14, 2011 | By Trenton Daniel, Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - The musician Michel Martelly will be sworn in as Haiti's president Saturday in front of the collapsed National Palace and a shantytown filled with thousands of people displaced by last year's earthquake - two stark reminders of the challenges faced by the neophyte politician. The performer known to Haitians as "Sweet Micky" is not expected to have much of a honeymoon amid deep frustration with a political leadership that has made little progress toward earthquake reconstruction or addressed many other problems, from a deeply dysfunctional judicial system to almost universal unemployment.
NEWS
April 11, 2009 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When she was 4, Judy Vredenburgh informed her mother that she didn't need her help to tie her shoelaces. So she plopped herself into a corner of the living room and didn't get up until she had mastered the skill. One hour later, she was a standing expert. Moral of the story: When Judy Vredenburgh locks onto a task - particularly one with strings attached - it would take an act of Congress to dissuade her. So it has been since 1999 for Vredenburgh and the national Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, headquartered in Philadelphia and the country's oldest and largest mentoring organization.
NEWS
November 28, 2006 | By Barbara Boyer and Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Police released a sketch last night of a gunman wanted in connection with five attacks on women - three in Center City. Last week, police issued an alert saying three women had been held up at gunpoint, robbed, and groped by a man who authorities now believe may have carried out five or more attacks. "We're always concerned that an individual responsible for sexual assaults may become more violent as the attacks continue," said Capt. Benjamin Naish, a police spokesman. "He should be considered armed and dangerous.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Painting what promises to be a brighter picture for Temple University and North Philadelphia, city and university officials announced plans yesterday to move the university's Tyler School of Art from Elkins Park, Montgomery County, to the main campus in North Philadelphia. "This is a great announcement for Temple University and the city, and a spectacular announcement for the community," Mayor Street said in a City Hall news conference. The new Tyler School is to be built on a vacant parcel bounded by 12th, Marvine, Norris and Diamond Streets.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|