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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Does the late painter Francis Speight, our most dedicated observer of the 1930s and '40s Philadelphia cityscape, have a true successor today? Two local painters, either of whom might aspire to that lofty post, are Larry Francis and James B. Williams. In solo shows at Gross McCleaf, their recent work is now on display. Francis, a Southwest Philadelphia native, is widely known for painting his urban landscapes on site, whether at Rittenhouse Square (including a recent commission for a European to take home as a remembrance of the city)
NEWS
July 28, 2001
Folks savoring coffee and pastries at shaded, sidewalk tables yesterday near 12th and Filbert Streets in Center City easily could miss that they sat in the shadow of a massive new parking garage. They'd have to crane their necks skyward, looking past classy, European-style awnings that skirt the block-long building. Only then would they realize that, yes, behind that handsome brick and stone, and the huge louvers in window-like openings, stood parking spaces for hundreds of vehicles.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | For The Inquirer / DAVID M. WARREN
Winter's broad strokes left Glassboro looking almost as if it might live up to its name yesterday. The snowstorm turned these railroad tracks near Ellis Street and the surrounding shrubbery into a surreal cityscape. Intervals of clouds and sunshine are expected today, with snow flurries in places.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1995 | BOB LARAMIE/ DAILY NEWS
Gerald Wolkoff (left) and Shimon Topor, new owners of 8 Penn Center at 17th Street and JFK Boulevard, unveil the building's new mural during a celebration marking the change in ownership at the 23-story office property. Joffe Yeni & Associates, the building's new management firm, commissioned the original cityscape from young artists Daniel Holland, Nyesah Bond, Evan Mahan, Matthew Kens and Luis Lee, members of the Philadelphia Anti-Graffiti Network.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this gambling resort, the way to celebrate Earth Week yesterday was to announce the city's latest wager on the redevelopment of its blighted neighborhoods: the construction of 20 environmentally friendly houses. Mayor James Whelan introduced plans for Cityscape, a grouping of duplexes that will be built with Casino Reinvestment Development Authority money on Melrose and Lexington Avenues between New Jersey and Connecticut Avenues. The area, between Route 30 and the Northeast Inlet, is considered one of the city's most blighted neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the risk of ungallantry, it must be reported that The Time of the Cuckoo, Arthur Laurents' bittersweet comedy about a middle-aged, unmarried American tourist and her rocky fling with a married Venetian shopkeeper, has not aged awfully well. Now being revived at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theatre, the play was much admired in its day. But its day was the Broadway season of 1952-53, and women have achieved too much independence in the intervening decades for lovelorn, romantic, good-old-girl Leona Samish to seem anything but a quaint anachronism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
In the show "In Celebration of Philadelphia" at the Gross McCleaf Gallery, 16 area artists take on the city. The tangy flavor of American life is very much present in paintings by Paul Rickert, Max Mason, James McElhinney, Larry Francis, Martha Armstrong and Steven Stokley. Rickert provides the show's brightest moment with a stunning overview of new Conshohocken highways and old housing. This large painting has a contemporary type of dignity about it; there is in this landscape a definiteness, an inevitability.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | BY DAVID S. TRAUB
Each time I walk by the corner of 15th and Latimer streets in Center City, I am saddened to be confronted with the large, open parking lot that now stretches south all the way to Spruce Street. Until last fall, though not architectural masterpieces, three fine buildings stood on this site. Two were three-story 19th century residential structures; the other was an early 20th century office building of about eight floors with a striking, high-arched entryway. Taken as a whole, they formed an ensemble of buildings that, where still found elsewhere, gives Philadelphia its unique character and interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | By Victoria Donohue FOR THE INQUIRER
Anything but pompous, Martha Armstrong's art offers direct meaning without sacrificing visual sophistication. Armstrong is an image-maker best known for her landscape and cityscape paintings and an occasional still life. Such work is the major theme dominating the 46-year retrospective of her paintings and drawings, "Up to Now," at Gross McCleaf. A distinctive feature of this work is its freshness. Anderson's canvases project a personality that makes them seem addressed to the present.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Does the late painter Francis Speight, our most dedicated observer of the 1930s and '40s Philadelphia cityscape, have a true successor today? Two local painters, either of whom might aspire to that lofty post, are Larry Francis and James B. Williams. In solo shows at Gross McCleaf, their recent work is now on display. Francis, a Southwest Philadelphia native, is widely known for painting his urban landscapes on site, whether at Rittenhouse Square (including a recent commission for a European to take home as a remembrance of the city)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | By Victoria Donohue FOR THE INQUIRER
Anything but pompous, Martha Armstrong's art offers direct meaning without sacrificing visual sophistication. Armstrong is an image-maker best known for her landscape and cityscape paintings and an occasional still life. Such work is the major theme dominating the 46-year retrospective of her paintings and drawings, "Up to Now," at Gross McCleaf. A distinctive feature of this work is its freshness. Anderson's canvases project a personality that makes them seem addressed to the present.
NEWS
January 2, 2008 | By Myra Bellin
Many people dislike the gray winters in Philadelphia. They find the season bleak and depressing. But I like the winter light; the slanting rays of sunshine that penetrate the ashen skies of December and January are soft and gentle. It is the light in my memories of the cold winters when I was a kid, winters that elicited no thoughts of global warming, winters when we could count on at least a few snowy days to drag our sleds up from the basement and tromp around the neighborhood searching for hills.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
In the 28 years since the Liberty Bell's last move, America has changed for the bigger. Houses, soda bottles, and the nation's waistlines have all expanded their average girth. So perhaps it is inevitable that the home of the bell has also been supersized. When the 2,080-pound icon is shifted today 100 yards to the southwest, it will come to rest in an airy, 13,000-square-foot building that is three times as big as the glass jewel box on Market Street. Instead of bumping straight into the national gong, visitors will be offered a warm-up exhibit of information panels, artifacts and video clips, all aimed at heightening the drama of their encounter with democracy's most potent relic.
NEWS
July 28, 2001
Folks savoring coffee and pastries at shaded, sidewalk tables yesterday near 12th and Filbert Streets in Center City easily could miss that they sat in the shadow of a massive new parking garage. They'd have to crane their necks skyward, looking past classy, European-style awnings that skirt the block-long building. Only then would they realize that, yes, behind that handsome brick and stone, and the huge louvers in window-like openings, stood parking spaces for hundreds of vehicles.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If solo shows could be given dedications, artist Christine Lafuente might choose to dedicate her show to Seymour Remenick, her former teacher at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Most of Lafuente's works on view at the Somerville Manning Gallery here are floral still lifes, but she has included several cityscapes of Manayunk, a frequent subject of hers. Lafuente, who lives in Philadelphia and is an artist-in-residence at the Fleisher Art Memorial, shows a Manayunk of narrow, red-brick homes, silvery windows and spots of color seen in street signs.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this gambling resort, the way to celebrate Earth Week yesterday was to announce the city's latest wager on the redevelopment of its blighted neighborhoods: the construction of 20 environmentally friendly houses. Mayor James Whelan introduced plans for Cityscape, a grouping of duplexes that will be built with Casino Reinvestment Development Authority money on Melrose and Lexington Avenues between New Jersey and Connecticut Avenues. The area, between Route 30 and the Northeast Inlet, is considered one of the city's most blighted neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the risk of ungallantry, it must be reported that The Time of the Cuckoo, Arthur Laurents' bittersweet comedy about a middle-aged, unmarried American tourist and her rocky fling with a married Venetian shopkeeper, has not aged awfully well. Now being revived at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theatre, the play was much admired in its day. But its day was the Broadway season of 1952-53, and women have achieved too much independence in the intervening decades for lovelorn, romantic, good-old-girl Leona Samish to seem anything but a quaint anachronism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1997 | By Susan Perloff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Weekday mornings I walk to nowhere on a treadmill at the Y. Healthy but boring. So when real-life walks appear, I run. Well, walk. Walking magazine recently listed Philadelphia as the nation's No. 10 destination for walking. They're wrong. We must be at least No. 3, if not No. 1. First of all, we have Fairmount Park, thought to be the largest municipal park on the planet. Even if you admit that dozens of smaller parks come under the jurisdiction of the Fairmount Park Commission, Philadelphia boasts 8,900 acres of green space.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | For The Inquirer / DAVID M. WARREN
Winter's broad strokes left Glassboro looking almost as if it might live up to its name yesterday. The snowstorm turned these railroad tracks near Ellis Street and the surrounding shrubbery into a surreal cityscape. Intervals of clouds and sunshine are expected today, with snow flurries in places.
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