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NEWS
December 9, 1994 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Avenue of the Arts construction along South Broad Street, the project that will detour Mummers onto Market Street for the 1995 New Year's Day parade, is moving along smartly, officials say. "If the weather cooperates, we hope to be as far north as South Street on our utility and storm drain work," said Matt Schultz, associate director, Avenue of the Arts, Inc. Colanero Construction of Southwest Philadelphia has the contract for the Avenue...
NEWS
April 14, 2001
Since nothing lives forever, it's safe to say that newspaper series - like everything else - must come to an end. The only possible exception could be Urban Warrior's "Dump of the Day. " Her source material seems inexhaustible. Even if, by some miracle, every trash-strewn eyesore in Philadelphia could disappear overnight, more would spring up by morning, like the proverbial dragon's teeth. Sad to say, there seems no limit to Philadelphians' capacity to foul their own nests.
NEWS
April 16, 2003
PHILADELPHIA is about to lose two of the most distinctive towers in our cityscape. No, not Liberty Place, but the two steam stacks of the SS United States, the massive cruise liner that's been languishing in Port 82 of the Delaware River since 1996. Yesterday, Norwegian Cruise Lines announced it has bought the liner with plans to refit it as one of four American-based cruise ships. We have mixed feelings about this news. This editorial page has been agitating for years about this looming hulk; her owner, real estate developer Edward Cantor, had it towed to Philadelphia in 1996, thinking he could talk the city into helping him get financing to fix it up. When that failed, he seemed to have done nothing but pay dockage fees - rumored to be $1,000 per day - for letting it sit. Private groups like the United States Foundation, who cared about the ship's future, launched many rescue efforts to ensure the ship not end up as a giant scrap metal heap, and at one point had the ship included on the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Michaels, who lives in Secaucus, N.J., places his ear against the funny-looking wooden contraption and sits stiller than any 8-year-old boy ought to be expected to sit. But it's only for a minute, while Mark Jones traces his profile. Then, voila! A silhouette, of the kind that the celebrated American painter Charles Willson Peale and his black servant (later free citizen) Moses Williams used to produce on the original physiognotrace. That's what the funny-looking contraption is called - although, as Jones tells visitors, Peale's painter son and favorite pupil Raphaelle used to call it the face-a-tracer.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The U.S. Postal Service is braced for a busy week at its World Stamp Expo '89 in Washington, with first-day ceremonies scheduled on six days. The lineup: TODAY. A cityscape 15-cent postal card, last of four in the series, featuring a night scene of Washington. Collectors who purchase their cards should send requests for first-day cancellations to Customer Supplied Cards, Washington, D.C., Postal Card, Box 96851, Washington, D.C. 20090-6851. If the Postal Service is to provide cards, requests with a check or money order of 15 cents should be sent to Washington, D.C., Postal Card, Box 96852, Washington, D.C. 20090-6852.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who knew the city had its own stash of movies? Both delightful and dreadful, the historic films depict Philadelphia life between the 1950s and 1980s in the earnest, unironic, relentlessly square cinematic style of scratchy old high school hygiene movies, along the lines of "Foot Care and You. " The creation of the 150 or so films was supervised by the Office of City Representative, the agency charged for decades with promoting Philadelphia....
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has acquired five major French paintings - a late Cézanne view of Mont Sainte-Victoire, a Manet still life of fruit, a landscape and a cityscape by Pissarro, and a portrait of a young girl by Berthe Morisot - all as a bequest from long-time museum supporter Helen Tyson Madeira, who died last year. In addition, the museum has received two early portraits by Marcel Duchamp, of the parents of his lifelong friend, Gustave Candel, donated by Candel's daughter, Yolande Candel.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
The  fidget space is on North Mascher Street just above Cecil B. Moore Avenue, in a little niche of the arts neighborhood around the corner from Mascher Space and between Crane Arts on American Street and Pig Iron's school on North Second Street. Dancer/choreographer Megan Bridge and composer/videographer Peter Price opened the walk-up loft at the top of the building in 2009 as a research laboratory for dance, and many local and out-of-town artists have worked in the space. On Thursday, Bridge, Zornitsa Stoyanova, and Annie Wilson danced while performance artist Mauri Walton sketched and drew words backward on the freshly painted white walls.
NEWS
April 26, 2015
The Future of Architecture in 100 Buildings By Marc Kushner TED/Simon & Schuster. 176 pp. $16.99) Reviewed by David L. Ulin   What is the future of architecture? That question grows more compelling the more we think about cities as vast networks in which infrastructure and sustainability are two sides of a very complicated dynamic. The way we build teaches important lessons about who we are. Not only that, suggests Marc Kushner in The Future of Architecture in 100 Buildings , but also "the world's 1.75 billion smartphones are fundamentally changing the way architecture is consumed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"The story of this film is very Shakespearean," says director James Wan. Executive producer Andrew Sugerman agrees: "It is a kind of classical Greek tragedy. It's a story about a man wrestling with his own inner demons. " Studio production notes are typically rife with such backslapping, highfalutin hyperbole, but really, please, Death Sentence? Wake up, guys. Get real. This cheesy exploitation drama, with Kevin Bacon as a dad gone mad when his son is killed by tattooed gangbangers, has been adapted, and updated (sort of)
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