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NEWS
April 16, 2003
PHILADELPHIA is about to lose two of the most distinctive towers in our cityscape. No, not Liberty Place, but the two steam stacks of the SS United States, the massive cruise liner that's been languishing in Port 82 of the Delaware River since 1996. Yesterday, Norwegian Cruise Lines announced it has bought the liner with plans to refit it as one of four American-based cruise ships. We have mixed feelings about this news. This editorial page has been agitating for years about this looming hulk; her owner, real estate developer Edward Cantor, had it towed to Philadelphia in 1996, thinking he could talk the city into helping him get financing to fix it up. When that failed, he seemed to have done nothing but pay dockage fees - rumored to be $1,000 per day - for letting it sit. Private groups like the United States Foundation, who cared about the ship's future, launched many rescue efforts to ensure the ship not end up as a giant scrap metal heap, and at one point had the ship included on the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Michaels, who lives in Secaucus, N.J., places his ear against the funny-looking wooden contraption and sits stiller than any 8-year-old boy ought to be expected to sit. But it's only for a minute, while Mark Jones traces his profile. Then, voila! A silhouette, of the kind that the celebrated American painter Charles Willson Peale and his black servant (later free citizen) Moses Williams used to produce on the original physiognotrace. That's what the funny-looking contraption is called - although, as Jones tells visitors, Peale's painter son and favorite pupil Raphaelle used to call it the face-a-tracer.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The U.S. Postal Service is braced for a busy week at its World Stamp Expo '89 in Washington, with first-day ceremonies scheduled on six days. The lineup: TODAY. A cityscape 15-cent postal card, last of four in the series, featuring a night scene of Washington. Collectors who purchase their cards should send requests for first-day cancellations to Customer Supplied Cards, Washington, D.C., Postal Card, Box 96851, Washington, D.C. 20090-6851. If the Postal Service is to provide cards, requests with a check or money order of 15 cents should be sent to Washington, D.C., Postal Card, Box 96852, Washington, D.C. 20090-6852.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Freeman's next big sale will take place March 17, but it is timed to coincide with Asia Week New York, not St. Paddy's Day, Philadelphia. The nearly 800 lots that will be offered beginning at 10 a.m. at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. are examples of fine and decorative Asian arts. The nearest thing to green to be seen on sale day will be items made of spinach jade, such as an 18th-century perfumier, and malachite, including a vase with a Fu lion mounted on its cover - and big bucks.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Drilling rigs are hardly a part of Philadelphia's cityscape, but the city will nonetheless receive just shy of $1.3 million this year from the state's new impact fee on natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale. Gov. Corbett released detailed numbers Monday about how much money every municipality and county will be allotted under the new law, which kicks the majority of the proceeds to drilling communities but also sends money to all counties for conservation, beautification, and other purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  In   "Possessions," one of five very fine entries in The Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2014: Animated , the ghost spirit of a broken old umbrella springs to life, causing a night of splendid havoc for a weary Japanese traveler. A gorgeously realized homage to the concept of Tsukumogami - that after 100 years, tools and instruments attain souls and self-awareness - Shuhei Morita's 'toon works as a metaphor for the process of animation itself: Whether the artist is using pencil and paper, or spacewarp software, the inanimate is transformed into something alive and vital.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"The story of this film is very Shakespearean," says director James Wan. Executive producer Andrew Sugerman agrees: "It is a kind of classical Greek tragedy. It's a story about a man wrestling with his own inner demons. " Studio production notes are typically rife with such backslapping, highfalutin hyperbole, but really, please, Death Sentence? Wake up, guys. Get real. This cheesy exploitation drama, with Kevin Bacon as a dad gone mad when his son is killed by tattooed gangbangers, has been adapted, and updated (sort of)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Snipes moves across a gritty Philadelphia cityscape where gangstas and rappers - and greedy record moguls - collide. A solid, suspenseful thriller with a surprising noir twist, the film, from director Rich Murray, follows a 17-year-old kid who gets tangled up in some nasty business involving stolen master tapes, kidnapping and murder. Snipes premiered at the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema in April, and is now rolling out into select markets nationwide. Erik (Sam Jones 3d)
NEWS
March 15, 2003 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And now, for something completely different. Looking like a nation of crazed Wallace Beerys, Brits of all ages appeared in public yesterday with hairy red plastic noses stuck on the front of their real noses. Others did stranger things. Several people took public baths in tubs filled with baked beans. Men shaved their legs in stripy patterns. Men and women in fright wigs jogged across the Thames. An entire class of police recruits posed with red noses beneath their bobby hats.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1996 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Set in a futuristic Tokyo with a burning chrome skyline, Ghost in the Shell is an eye-popping, mind-blowing "Japanimation" adventure in cyberspace. A cult favorite at the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema last month, the adult cartoon encores commercially at the Cinemagic 3. Ghost takes place in 2029, in a world in which people no longer live in countries but in Internet virtual communities. The action, and there is a lot of it, revolves around a female uber-cyborg named Kusanagi whose circuitry is augmented with voluptuous human flesh.
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