CollectionsCityscape
IN THE NEWS

Cityscape

ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011 | BY MOIRA MACDONALD, The Seattle Times
"THERE ARE places you go to and once is enough. And then there's Napoli," says the actor/director John Turturro, as we gaze at the weathered cityscape of Naples. Turturro's clearly in love with the Italian city and its music, and he shares that with us in his first documentary, "Passione: A Musical Adventure. " Loosely structured as a sort of musical travelogue, with 23 song performances interwoven, it's as passionate as the singers it showcases, enveloping the viewer in the soulful music it celebrates.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
No city regulatory agency had the authority to review removal of the iconic PNB letters from their 60-year home atop a Center City tower on Sunday, according to city officials. The removal was announced last Friday, and on Sunday helicopters hovered over Broad and Chestnut Streets, lifting the 16-foot, 11/2-ton letters from the Art Deco high-rise built by the Wanamaker estate in 1930. The action came so swiftly that it caught many in the preservation and arts community off guard.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A couple of skinny teens, stripped to their underwear, unleash a reckless storm of automatic weapons fire - weapons they've jacked from local criminals - just for laughs. In Gomorrah , these kids, Marco (Marco Macor) and Ciro, a.k.a. Piselli (Ciro Petrone), walk around playing bad guys, snorting coke, quoting Al Pacino in Scarface , and brazenly, stupidly, crossing paths with the Camorra crime clan - the real thugs who run Naples. Marco and Piselli supply but one plot strand in Italian filmmaker Matteo Garrone's searing, documentary-like adaptation of Roberto Saviano's expose about the Naples mafia - gangs whose influence infests the community and the country at large.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Snipes is a solid, suspenseful thriller set in Philadelphia and costarring hip-hop icons Nelly and Schoolly D. Moving across a gritty cityscape where gangstas and rappers - and greedhead record moguls - collide, the pic, from writer-director Richard Murray, is an intricately plotted tale centering on a watchful 17-year-old, Erik (Sam Jones 3d), caught up in some ugly business involving stolen tapes, kidnapping and murder. Erik's an ace "sniper" - a street-trooper who plasters lampposts and buildings with posters hyping the latest rap releases.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Avenue of the Arts construction along South Broad Street, the project that will detour Mummers onto Market Street for the 1995 New Year's Day parade, is moving along smartly, officials say. "If the weather cooperates, we hope to be as far north as South Street on our utility and storm drain work," said Matt Schultz, associate director, Avenue of the Arts, Inc. Colanero Construction of Southwest Philadelphia has the contract for the Avenue...
NEWS
April 14, 2001
Since nothing lives forever, it's safe to say that newspaper series - like everything else - must come to an end. The only possible exception could be Urban Warrior's "Dump of the Day. " Her source material seems inexhaustible. Even if, by some miracle, every trash-strewn eyesore in Philadelphia could disappear overnight, more would spring up by morning, like the proverbial dragon's teeth. Sad to say, there seems no limit to Philadelphians' capacity to foul their own nests.
NEWS
April 16, 2003
PHILADELPHIA is about to lose two of the most distinctive towers in our cityscape. No, not Liberty Place, but the two steam stacks of the SS United States, the massive cruise liner that's been languishing in Port 82 of the Delaware River since 1996. Yesterday, Norwegian Cruise Lines announced it has bought the liner with plans to refit it as one of four American-based cruise ships. We have mixed feelings about this news. This editorial page has been agitating for years about this looming hulk; her owner, real estate developer Edward Cantor, had it towed to Philadelphia in 1996, thinking he could talk the city into helping him get financing to fix it up. When that failed, he seemed to have done nothing but pay dockage fees - rumored to be $1,000 per day - for letting it sit. Private groups like the United States Foundation, who cared about the ship's future, launched many rescue efforts to ensure the ship not end up as a giant scrap metal heap, and at one point had the ship included on the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Michaels, who lives in Secaucus, N.J., places his ear against the funny-looking wooden contraption and sits stiller than any 8-year-old boy ought to be expected to sit. But it's only for a minute, while Mark Jones traces his profile. Then, voila! A silhouette, of the kind that the celebrated American painter Charles Willson Peale and his black servant (later free citizen) Moses Williams used to produce on the original physiognotrace. That's what the funny-looking contraption is called - although, as Jones tells visitors, Peale's painter son and favorite pupil Raphaelle used to call it the face-a-tracer.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The U.S. Postal Service is braced for a busy week at its World Stamp Expo '89 in Washington, with first-day ceremonies scheduled on six days. The lineup: TODAY. A cityscape 15-cent postal card, last of four in the series, featuring a night scene of Washington. Collectors who purchase their cards should send requests for first-day cancellations to Customer Supplied Cards, Washington, D.C., Postal Card, Box 96851, Washington, D.C. 20090-6851. If the Postal Service is to provide cards, requests with a check or money order of 15 cents should be sent to Washington, D.C., Postal Card, Box 96852, Washington, D.C. 20090-6852.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Freeman's next big sale will take place March 17, but it is timed to coincide with Asia Week New York, not St. Paddy's Day, Philadelphia. The nearly 800 lots that will be offered beginning at 10 a.m. at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. are examples of fine and decorative Asian arts. The nearest thing to green to be seen on sale day will be items made of spinach jade, such as an 18th-century perfumier, and malachite, including a vase with a Fu lion mounted on its cover - and big bucks.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|