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NEWS
September 16, 2011
By Sandra Day O'Connor Every morning at the beginning of class, students all over America stand and place their right hands over their hearts to give the Pledge of Allegiance. Sadly, for too many kids, this will be the limit of their civic education and engagement. At a time when our nation is making decisions about fundamental, long-term priorities - economic solvency, budget parameters, health policy, the United States' role in a volatile world, and more - too few Americans are prepared to join or benefit from the debate.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | By Marjorie O. Rendell, Richard Stengel and Michael H. Reed
All across the country, in big cities and small towns, in red states and blue ones, energetic and expensive efforts are being made to get young people to vote. Last time around, only 13 percent of eligible young people actually went to the polls. The percentage of young people voting in presidential elections has fallen since 18-year-olds first were given the right to vote in 1972 - with one exception, 1992, when Bill Clinton's answer to "boxers or briefs?" seemed to energize younger voters.
NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She was just a trim white-haired lady in a black-and-white checked jacket and black button earrings, but she nearly took Shard? Miller's breath away. "She's my dream," Miller, a junior at Constitution High, said of retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. O'Connor spent the first part of her day in a Philadelphia courtroom, helping to clear a backlog on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. She wore a black robe and asked some questions. Later, she traveled to Constitution High School - a Center City magnet school emphasizing history and civics - for a ceremony christening a new mock-trial courtroom in her name.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Democrat and a Republican were bantering about the youth of today when one of them noted that 18- and 19-year-olds had the lowest voter registration numbers in the county. The problem must be civic education, said Chester County Commissioner Andrew Dinniman, the Democrat. "If civic education was successful, they would be lining up at the polls," Dinniman said. "Too many people are alienated from their communities and their government. " The Republican, State Sen. James W. Gerlach, suggested creating the "Jefferson School for Citizenship," a half-day charter school providing courses on community and government, with local and national politicians addressing high school students as guest speakers.
NEWS
September 30, 2004 | By Jane Eisner
Imagine a nation whose young people suffer from a huge gap in civic knowledge - about the workings of government, the values of democracy, the skills of citizenship. As a result, the young people vote at shockingly low rates and don't participate much in political life. At the same time, the nation is blessed with many educators who want to turn around this civic amnesia and even public officials who recognize what needs to be done. But to hold schools accountable, to separate the good programs from the ineffective ones, the nation needs to test its students every now and then to assess how much they are learning.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | BY LILLIAN KELLOGG & MICHELLE HERCZOG
THE NATIONAL Conference on Citizenship and National Constitution Center last week celebrated the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, in Philadelphia, and the Partnership for 21st Century Skills is exploring how citizenship has changed in the 21st century. Rapid technological advancements, economic globalization and political forces around the world have had a profound impact on our democracy and on what it means to be a productive member of society.
NEWS
September 15, 2005 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brandon Claybrook didn't have much interest in American government until he signed up two years ago for a new extracurricular program at Cheltenham High School called Constitution Scholars. Now, he is an expert on issues ranging from the free speech rights of Internet spammers to the implications of state laws denying felons the right to vote. He has been to the U.S. Supreme Court, and joined other students from Cheltenham and Masterman High School in Philadelphia to discuss constitutional issues with Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Stephen Breyer.
NEWS
July 15, 2009 | By Trudy Rubin
It is the last place where you'd expect to find a school that teaches about civic rights - and has links to Philadelphia's National Constitution Center. But after driving an hour from central Kabul, over potholed roads jammed with trucks, cars, motorbikes, and carts, and then maneuvering along a narrow, rutted dirt track and through wheel-deep puddles of water, we reached the Marefat school. The two-story, pale-green, concrete building is built around a courtyard, with a balcony opening onto second-story classrooms.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Charles M. Tampio
Courage is not a willingness to take action in the face of danger without fear; courage is the determination to act despite fear. The young Americans we have asked to put their lives on the line in the name of liberty and liberation provide lessons in courage every day. Images and examples of bravery come to us now with incredible immediacy as unprecedented media coverage gives us rare glimpses into the daily sacrifices our troops are required to...
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
As Pennsylvania's first lady, Marjorie O. Rendell has traveled the state to talk about issues relating to civic education, history and the arts, often with the governor by her side. But with Gov. Rendell running for reelection, she is nowhere to be seen on the campaign trail. Unlike those of first ladies before her, Rendell's day job as a judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit means she has to adhere to strict rules of conduct that prevent her from delving into politics.
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NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Former Gov. Ed Rendell and his wife, Judge Marjorie O. Rendell, are launching a program with Arcadia University and the National Constitution Center to boost citizen engagement in the democratic process - in part by getting young people interested early. At a morning news conference at the Constitution Center, the Rendells announced the formation of the Rendell Center for Citizenship and Civics at Arcadia. Ed Rendell cited a poll conducted before the Constitution Center opened in 2003 that he said showed "high school students were remarkably uninformed about our system of government.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | BY LILLIAN KELLOGG & MICHELLE HERCZOG
THE NATIONAL Conference on Citizenship and National Constitution Center last week celebrated the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, in Philadelphia, and the Partnership for 21st Century Skills is exploring how citizenship has changed in the 21st century. Rapid technological advancements, economic globalization and political forces around the world have had a profound impact on our democracy and on what it means to be a productive member of society.
NEWS
September 16, 2011
By Sandra Day O'Connor Every morning at the beginning of class, students all over America stand and place their right hands over their hearts to give the Pledge of Allegiance. Sadly, for too many kids, this will be the limit of their civic education and engagement. At a time when our nation is making decisions about fundamental, long-term priorities - economic solvency, budget parameters, health policy, the United States' role in a volatile world, and more - too few Americans are prepared to join or benefit from the debate.
NEWS
July 15, 2009 | By Trudy Rubin
It is the last place where you'd expect to find a school that teaches about civic rights - and has links to Philadelphia's National Constitution Center. But after driving an hour from central Kabul, over potholed roads jammed with trucks, cars, motorbikes, and carts, and then maneuvering along a narrow, rutted dirt track and through wheel-deep puddles of water, we reached the Marefat school. The two-story, pale-green, concrete building is built around a courtyard, with a balcony opening onto second-story classrooms.
NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She was just a trim white-haired lady in a black-and-white checked jacket and black button earrings, but she nearly took Shard? Miller's breath away. "She's my dream," Miller, a junior at Constitution High, said of retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. O'Connor spent the first part of her day in a Philadelphia courtroom, helping to clear a backlog on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. She wore a black robe and asked some questions. Later, she traveled to Constitution High School - a Center City magnet school emphasizing history and civics - for a ceremony christening a new mock-trial courtroom in her name.
NEWS
September 15, 2008 | By Marjorie O. Rendell
At the close of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, 221 years ago this week, a crowd approached Benjamin Franklin. They asked whether the founders had created a monarchy or a republic. "A Republic, if you can keep it," he replied. Franklin's brief response captures the dual qualities upon which the survival of American democracy depends: an enduring Constitution, and an engaged and informed citizenry. Each depends on the other - citizens need the Constitution to guide them, and the Constitution needs citizens to infuse it with new meaning in each generation.
NEWS
November 20, 2006 | By Matt Joyce
On Dec. 2, Philadelphia will host at Lincoln Financial Field the 107th annual bout between the U.S. Military Academy and the U.S. Naval Academy. For another late autumn weekend, Philly will be brimming with some of the most talented and driven undergraduates in the country, all in town to support their football teams. These students are not only among the nation's best football fans but also among its top scholars, each exchanging a commitment to military service for a free, top-notch education.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
As Pennsylvania's first lady, Marjorie O. Rendell has traveled the state to talk about issues relating to civic education, history and the arts, often with the governor by her side. But with Gov. Rendell running for reelection, she is nowhere to be seen on the campaign trail. Unlike those of first ladies before her, Rendell's day job as a judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit means she has to adhere to strict rules of conduct that prevent her from delving into politics.
NEWS
September 15, 2005 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brandon Claybrook didn't have much interest in American government until he signed up two years ago for a new extracurricular program at Cheltenham High School called Constitution Scholars. Now, he is an expert on issues ranging from the free speech rights of Internet spammers to the implications of state laws denying felons the right to vote. He has been to the U.S. Supreme Court, and joined other students from Cheltenham and Masterman High School in Philadelphia to discuss constitutional issues with Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Stephen Breyer.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | By Marjorie O. Rendell, Richard Stengel and Michael H. Reed
All across the country, in big cities and small towns, in red states and blue ones, energetic and expensive efforts are being made to get young people to vote. Last time around, only 13 percent of eligible young people actually went to the polls. The percentage of young people voting in presidential elections has fallen since 18-year-olds first were given the right to vote in 1972 - with one exception, 1992, when Bill Clinton's answer to "boxers or briefs?" seemed to energize younger voters.
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