CollectionsCivic Engagement
IN THE NEWS

Civic Engagement

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
WHYY yesterday hired former Inquirer editorial page editor Chris Satullo for a new position overseeing the public broadcaster's radio, TV and Internet news operations. He will begin work Dec. 15. WHYY will announce Satullo's title this week, and he will be "responsible for all our news and civic-engagement initiatives," said William J. Marrazzo, president and chief executive officer. "We intend to expand our news services on all platforms," Marrazzo said. Both men said that could mean more regularly scheduled news programs on radio and television.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
Harris Steinberg is executive director of PennPraxis, School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania As a specialist in civic engagement, urban planning, and creating partnerships, I was invited to Haiti by the State Department to lead workshops with local cultural, arts, academic, and nonprofit groups on using civic engagement as a springboard for action. I approached the assignment with a healthy dose of skepticism and a dash of trepidation. After all, how could a few days on the ground in a country without civil society as we know it make any sense of civic engagement?
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | By David Boldt
The most fascinating factoid in Robert Putnam's book Bowling Alone is his discovery from marketing data that people who give the finger to other drivers are also very likely to cheat on their taxes. Such information could be useful. The Internal Revenue Service could, for instance, drive an unmarked car back and forth along Kelly Drive at the posted speed limit and note the license plate numbers of people who flipped its agents the bird, then audit their returns. More challenging, however, is figuring out what to do regarding Putnam's overall conclusion: that virtually all forms of personal interaction in the United States, from membership in civic organizations to simply having friends over for dinner, are currently in rapid decline.
NEWS
September 13, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann yesterday pledged to fund an additional 400 community service jobs for students over the next four years - tripling the effort on the West Philadelphia campus, officials said yesterday. Gutmann's comments came during a speech at a two-day national conference in New York City aimed at addressing the nation's social challenges through volunteerism. "We will embed the ethos of civic engagement more deeply in the life of the university," Gutmann said during a luncheon at the Hilton in Manhattan.
NEWS
September 18, 2007
The next five years of the state takeover of Camden need to look different from the past five years. Gov. Corzine signed legislation on Sunday that extends state control of the beleaguered city, which began in 2002 with $175 million in state aid. Camden does need continued cash and oversight from the state. The city's tax base is weak, producing annual deficits of about $35 million. Too many families live in poverty and fear. The schools are reeling from cheating scandals and corruption.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | BY REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
YOUNG INVOLVED Philadelphia, an all-volunteer organization that aims to engage young people with issues faced by the city, is not exclusive to the Gen Y demographic. "Young isn't an age range; it's an energy and spirit," said board chair Claire Robertson-Kraft. "The people who come [to YIP events] are young and young at heart, focused on generating new ideas for the city. " Many of those ideas will be discussed over the next two weeks during YIP's second annual State of Young Philadelphia series, which kicks off tomorrow.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two public-policy centers in the Philadelphia region are joining forces with the goal of improving civics education in schools. The Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement, created in 2013 in collaboration with the National Constitution Center, has relocated from Arcadia University in Glenside to the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, the institutions announced Wednesday. The Rendell Center, a nonprofit led by Judge Marjorie O. Rendell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, develops civics lessons for lower grades, while the Annenberg Center has worked with middle and high schools.
NEWS
December 6, 2006
Philadelphia is almost great. The job of the next decade is to get all the way to great. This arc of progress must be the work of the whole region, not just the job of a clique of elected officials. The work can begin with talk - smart, purposeful, civil, but honest talk that public officials - especially the next mayor - need to hear. You can be part of such a dialogue through a series of forums, Great Expectations: Citizen Voices on Philadelphia's Future, sponsored by The Inquirer Editorial Board's Citizen Voices project and the University of Pennsylvania's Project on Civic Engagement.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
With an emphasis on public service and increasing civic engagement, the Nutter administration has hired its first "chief service officer. " Catie C. Wolfgang, the new officer, will focus on recruiting volunteers and coordinating their efforts with various city programs. She will also oversee a new website being developed. Her position is being funded through a two-year $200,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. Philadelphia was one of 10 cities to receive the money, through a Cities of Service Leadership grant.
NEWS
January 6, 2011 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
The new civil-rights movement involves bridging the gap in technology, something that will be the major theme of this month's 16th annual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service, organizers said yesterday. Social media and digital inclusion will be the focus of this year's event, which is expected to draw a record 75,000 volunteers to more than 1,200 community-service projects on Jan. 17, the 25th anniversary of the King federal holiday. "If Dr. King were here today he would see that 41 percent of all Philadelphians don't have any access to the Internet," Todd Bernstein, founder and director of the event, said at a news conference yesterday at Girard College.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rutgers University wants to organize a massive community service event through its Camden campus, it turns to its "civic scholars," dozens of undergraduate students who have committed to dedicating a large part of their college lives to civic engagement. The Rutgers-Camden students put in at least 300 hours each year: working with neighborhood groups, attending conferences and workshops, organizing campuswide days of service during student orientation and Martin Luther King's Birthday.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two public-policy centers in the Philadelphia region are joining forces with the goal of improving civics education in schools. The Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement, created in 2013 in collaboration with the National Constitution Center, has relocated from Arcadia University in Glenside to the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, the institutions announced Wednesday. The Rendell Center, a nonprofit led by Judge Marjorie O. Rendell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, develops civics lessons for lower grades, while the Annenberg Center has worked with middle and high schools.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max King, a former editor of The Inquirer, has been chosen to head one the nation's largest philanthropic organizations, the Pittsburgh Foundation, the group announced Friday. King led The Inquirer from 1990 to 1998, during which the paper won a Pulitzer Prize for explanatory journalism and Time Magazine recognized it as one of the five best newspapers in America. He previously served as a city editor and executive vice president under his predecessor as editor, Gene Roberts. After The Inquirer, King spent nine years as president of the Heinz Endowments, another charitable foundation based in Pittsburgh, and six years on the board of the National Council on Foundations, which supports philanthropic organizations.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Graduating from the University of Pennsylvania with a strong desire to change the world and an excellent plan for how to do it? A new Penn program may fund you. Penn president Amy Gutmann has created "engagement prizes" of up to $150,000 - $50,000 for living expenses and $100,000 for project execution - for students with the most promising plans to improve local, national, or global conditions in the year after their graduation. "We want to maximize the encouragement we can give our students who do well by doing good in the world," Gutmann said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University announced a new chancellor Wednesday for its Camden campus: a former professor at Temple University's law school who is now the law school dean at the University of Maryland. Phoebe A. Haddon, 63, will join Rutgers-Camden on July 1, returning to a region where she worked for decades and the state where she grew up. "It seems like a great place for me to come to after five years of being a dean here. It has a real nice-size campus for the kind of work that I'd like to do," Haddon said Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I USUALLY WRITE about what's not working. You know, Congress, the Legislature, Philly schools. Mostly I place fault with those in charge; all those in charge, regardless of party. I do this in hopes that bringing attention to what's wrong can serve as motivation to make it right. Sometimes that works. Some years ago, I wrote about a decorated Pennsylvania State Police trooper whose wife and three children were denied death benefits after the trooper died of a heart attack on duty.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
The Upper Darby School District released a $165 million budget that closes a $9.7 million shortfall with staff reductions, transportation cuts, and other savings, many of them reflecting priorities suggested in a series of community forums. Residents still face a 2.94 percent property-tax increase, much less than the 6.6 percent that could have been levied before going to a referendum, said Superintendent Louis DeVlieger. "No school district programs will be cut, no employee will lose a job, and kindergarten, art, music, and sports will all remain intact while still reaching our goal of $9.7 million," he said in presenting the budget to the board Tuesday night.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
Harris Steinberg is executive director of PennPraxis, School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania As a specialist in civic engagement, urban planning, and creating partnerships, I was invited to Haiti by the State Department to lead workshops with local cultural, arts, academic, and nonprofit groups on using civic engagement as a springboard for action. I approached the assignment with a healthy dose of skepticism and a dash of trepidation. After all, how could a few days on the ground in a country without civil society as we know it make any sense of civic engagement?
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly after becoming Drexel University's president in 2010, John A. Fry stood before the faculty and student body at convocation and declared civic engagement as one of his major goals. "My aspiration for Drexel University is for it to be the most civically engaged university in the United States, across all three dimensions of engagement: academic, student, and employee voluntarism, and institutionally supported neighborhood investment," Fry told the packed auditorium of about 900 people.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Juleyka Lantigua-Williams
Ever since the latest census confirmed that Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in America, I've been thinking about Spider-Man's motto: "With great power comes great responsibility. " As a Latino American, I feel the need to temper my enthusiasm about our new place in our country with a healthy sense of responsibility. If we honor four of the foundations of Latino culture — family, education, financial security, and civic engagement — we ought to do just fine. Latinos are intensely proud of our sense of family.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|