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Civil Disobedience

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NEWS
September 4, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN THE SPIRIT of a 1970s Burger King commercial, low-paid fast-food workers in Philadelphia - and around the nation - say they're more determined than ever to have it their way. Tomorrow, employees not just from Burger King but also from McDonald's, KFC, Popeyes and other iconic fast-food chains seeking a $15-an-hour wage and the right to unionize hope to stage their largest one-day job action ever - punctuated by sit-ins and other acts of civil...
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | By Scott Holleran
The Elian Gonzalez story continues to unfold like an opera: the daring escape, his mother's heroic struggle to fasten him to an inner tube before she drowned, his grandmothers' staged visit and the Catholic nun's astonishing change of mind about his return to communist Cuba. This week, the last act may play in Miami as a showdown between Attorney General Janet Reno, who issued an ultimatum, and the voices of opposition. Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Miami-Dade County Mayor Alex Penelas appear reluctant to cooperate with the feds and pleaded with Reno to suspend her campaign.
NEWS
March 21, 2003 | By Frank Davies INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Antiwar activists lit candles in dozens of cities yesterday, created major disruptions in San Francisco, blocked a bridge in Washington, and tried a new tactic by e-mailing their support to U.S. troops heading into battle. During the first full day of the invasion of Iraq, peace groups had mixed success in grabbing public attention to protest a war they couldn't prevent. Debate within their ranks centered on how to disrupt normal activity without creating resentment. "There is a fine line, and we're not looking to create a backlash," said Joe Flood, 21, a Harvard University student, as he marched across a bridge into downtown Boston.
NEWS
August 30, 2003
In his commentary "Thou shalt not be meddlesome" (Aug. 19) Steven Lubet condemns Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore for refusing to obey a judge's order to remove a display of the Ten Commandments from the State Judicial Building. He also condemns the U.S. House for voting to prohibit the Justice Department from using federal funds to implement the order to remove the display. Lubet compared Moore's stand to Alabama Gov. George Wallace's stand at the entrance of the University of Alabama in 1963 in his futile gesture to prevent the university from being racially integrated.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | By John T. Crist
During the last two decades of the 20th century, the world watched with amazement as one popular nonviolent uprising after another helped topple the old-guard leadership in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, South Africa, the Philippines, and most recently in Serbia against Europe's last despot. Most of these events were entirely unpredicted by the sagest of observers, who believed that such action could never be successful against entrenched and antidemocratic regimes.
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what organizers called "a turning point for the pro-choice movement," a half-dozen chanting demonstrators were carted off by police yesterday after several dozen stormed across Fifth Avenue and raised a five-point "proclamation" at the door of St. Patrick's Cathedral. "This is a real turning point," said Merle Hoffman, founder of the New York Pro-Choice Coalition. "It's the first time we've ever employed civil disobedience as a tool in our struggle to maintain women's rights.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The Indiana judge, with the brio of an abstract artist, and similar results, improvised. "I didn't want to send them to jail," he said of the criminals whose crimes were two misdemeanors, obstructing pedestrian traffic and trespassing during protests at two abortion clinics. "But I did want them to do something that would make them uncomfortable, make them think about what they're doing. " To fine-tune their thoughts, this judge sentenced them to sit quietly in an abortion clinic for eight hours.
NEWS
September 19, 2000
Granted, it takes a lot of commitment to sit down in the middle of an expressway on-ramp for a cause; a lot of courage to stay put once you have the full attention of even the most well-behaved police department, and a lot of character to keep cool as you're singled out and carted off to an unknown fate. But translating those actions into societal change takes a vision. Achieving a vision takes planning, training and discipline. It takes an awareness of the possibly dire consequences of your actions, and a willingness to accept those consequences.
NEWS
March 2, 2003 | By Dana Hull INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If U.S.-led forces attack Iraq, antiwar activists in Philadelphia and around the country plan to blockade federal buildings and disrupt major business districts with large protests and nonviolent civil disobedience. Many organizers have kept their intentions under wraps, so that police and officials at targeted sites, including large corporations and U.S. military bases, will be caught off guard. But drafts of some plans have appeared on Web sites, and training sessions on topics such as "nonviolent blockades" are under way. In Philadelphia, more than 1,200 people have signed a pledge to protest at the Federal Building two days after the war begins, said Robert M. Smith of Brandywine Peace Community.
NEWS
December 3, 2001 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Black Clergy of Philadelphia and Vicinity vowed yesterday to keep up the pressure on the city and state with acts of civil disobedience - as a way of having their say in the future of the city's public schools. About 25 clergy - including the group's president, the Rev. Vernal E. Simms Sr. - protested the state's planned takeover of the school system Friday by blocking Broad and Vine Streets and the entrance and exits to the Vine Street Expressway. Yesterday, as the group contemplated other demonstrations, Mr. Simms gave thanks that he was in church addressing his congregation - and not in jail.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
IN A SPEECH to the United Nations recently, President Obama said that climate change is a more serious threat than terrorism. So, why aren't more Americans terrified? A parade of panicked politicians talk about the Islamic militant group ISIS as if it were a combination of Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Soviet Union, faulting the president for not taking drastic action sooner. But climate change? What's the hurry? A majority of Americans (67 percent, in an August Pew/USA Today poll)
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN THE SPIRIT of a 1970s Burger King commercial, low-paid fast-food workers in Philadelphia - and around the nation - say they're more determined than ever to have it their way. Tomorrow, employees not just from Burger King but also from McDonald's, KFC, Popeyes and other iconic fast-food chains seeking a $15-an-hour wage and the right to unionize hope to stage their largest one-day job action ever - punctuated by sit-ins and other acts of civil...
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
History should decide, not the courts, whether Chris Goldstein and Don DeZarn - two New Jerseyans who each lit up a hand-rolled marijuana cigarette during a protest at Independence National Historical Park last year - belong in the same pantheon as Mohandas K. Gandhi, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, and Allen Ginsberg, a federal judge said in a caustic written opinion issued this week. In her 10-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Cynthia M. Rufe in Philadelphia rejected appeals filed by Goldstein, 38, of Willingboro, and DeZarn, 48, of East Windsor, who argued that identical two-year probationary terms and $3,000 fines imposed by a lower court were harsh and that they should not have been ordered to stay away from future marijuana protests at the park, which Goldstein had organized.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
'Where," asks the protagonist of Catch-22 , "are the Snowdens of yesteryear?" Some of them, as it turns out, were here. In a Philadelphia suburb one night four decades ago, as the nation watched a heavyweight championship fight between Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali, an act of civil disobedience unfolded that was remarkable in many ways - among them that most of its perpetrators remained unknown until last week. Tuesday's publication of The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI , by Betty Medsger, unveiled the long-concealed story of the band of local Vietnam War opponents who broke into the FBI's offices in Media.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AN ORGANIZER of a marijuana-legalization rally that drew more than 100 people and ended in scuffles with law-enforcement officers on Independence Mall in May was sentenced in federal court yesterday to one year of probation. Richard Tamaccio, 34, a Philadelphian comedian who goes by the stage name N.a. Poe, was also ordered by U.S. Magistrate Judge Henry Perkin during his probation to, among other things: * Not use drugs. * Undergo drug testing. * Not enter within 100 feet of Independence National Historical Park if there is a demonstration promoting a criminal act, such as smoking pot. Tamaccio, a thin man dressed in a white button-down shirt, gray slacks and a tie with a small image of a marijuana leaf on it, was cleanshaven yesterday.
NEWS
April 20, 2013 | By Grant Schulte, Associated Press
GRAND ISLAND, Neb. - Opponents of a massive Canada-to-Texas oil pipeline converged on a snowy Nebraska town Thursday for a critical hearing on the project, but they already were preparing for acts of civil disobedience should President Obama approve it. Despite a storm that brought sleet and snow to Nebraska, the U.S. State Department hearing in Grand Island drew more than 1,000 supporters and opponents from around the state, as well as outside activists...
NEWS
April 18, 2013
I KNOW that people are always searching for truth and often try to find it in a trendy, cool, new religion. The central tenet of this hot new religion in Pennsylvania appears to be that the PSSA and other standardized tests are the Devil's work. Does this bold new claim come from Pope Francis, seeking a return to Catholic orthodoxy? Does it come from any of the Protestant sects that broke with the Catholic Church during the Protestant Reformation? Maybe Jews or Muslims have discovered this in a sacred text?
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The words, about 7,000 in all, were scribbled in the margins of newspapers and on other scrap paper. They did not show the soaring rhetoric he would use in a famous speech in Washington just months later. But some say the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter From Birmingham Jail" – a sharp, at times line-by-line rebuke of arguments white clergymen made denouncing King's tactic of nonviolent protest – marked a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement, swaying clergymen to become more and more involved.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Associated Press
SANFORD, Fla. - Thousands joined a march Saturday through the Florida town where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer, vowing to continue protesting until an arrest is made. Protesters carried signs, chanted "Justice for Trayvon," and clutched the hands of their children while they walked from Crooms Academy of Information Technology - the county's first high school for black students - to the Sanford Police Department. The march was organized by the NAACP and was one of several taking place over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gossip guzzlers are going stark raving nuts over a TMZ photo that shows America's sweetie, Drew Barrymore , 37 Wednesday, outside a physician's office holding a sonogram photo print. This must mean she and fiancé Will Kopelman are expecting their first baby! Heck, it could also mean Drew had a friend's photo! Perhaps she wanted to mess with TMZ and asked some random patient, "Ma'am, may I borrow your sonogram?"   Whitney cemetery closed The Fairview Cemetery in Westfield, N.J., where Whitney Houston was laid to rest on Sunday, closed its gates to the public Monday following an onrush of fans who clogged its tiny lanes with more than 100 cars.
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