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NEWS
May 2, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saul Doner, 70, a Center City attorney for 40 years, died of cancer Thursday at his home in Ventnor, N.J. He formerly lived in Cherry Hill. Mr. Doner specialized in civil law, but took cases ranging from defending a Teamsters' official on a racketeering charge to representing a Philadelphia man who sought $1.3 million he said he won in the state lottery. Mr. Doner also was involved in the proposed merger of two large Jewish congregations in South Jersey in 1990. He was president of the former Beth Jacob-Beth Israel Congregation of Cherry Hill that was trying to unite with M'Kor Shalom of Mount Laurel.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
KATY PERRY may get her convent after all. California Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant said yesterday he believes a group of elderly nuns improperly sold their hilltop convent to entrepreneur Dana Hollister , but the judge delayed any efforts by church officials to finalize a competing sale by the archdiocese to Katy. Yesterday's mixed ruling by Chalfant will tie up the once-lavish estate in months of litigation. While the judge preliminarily ruled that Hollister's purchase of the convent is invalid, he ordered her to pay $25,000 a month to support the nuns and denied reps from Perry or Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez access to the convent during the dispute.
NEWS
July 14, 1986 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beverly H. Foster has a degree in East Indian history, taught elementary school and worked for an architectural company. Foster, 40, also has a law degree from Rutgers University, clerked for two N.Y. Supreme Court justices, served two years as an assistant in the Bronx district attorney's office and practiced nine years as an attorney. Her next post is expected to be that of district justice of Radnor Township. "I have a lot of litigation experience, which will help me as a magistrate," she said.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack C. Briscoe, 94, of Drexel Hill, a longtime Philadelphia lawyer and a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, died Monday, Dec. 1, of heart failure at the Sunrise of Granite Run senior living home in Media. Born in 1920 in Bradford, Pa., Mr. Briscoe was the son of an oil industry worker, Park H., and a homemaker, Gertrude. Mr. Briscoe graduated from Bradford High School in 1937 before attending the University of Pennsylvania. To help pay for the cost of tuition, Mr. Briscoe worked as a locomotive fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad Seashore Line.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael J. Melody Jr., 80, of Exton, a Chester County Common Pleas Court judge for 22 years, died of pneumonia on Thursday, May 17, at St. Martha Manor in Downingtown, a skilled-nursing home owned by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Melody graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1950, earned a bachelor's degree at what is now St. Joseph's University in 1954, and graduated in 1957 from what is now Georgetown University Law Center. Until 1959, he served in the Army.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writers
Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua broke civil and church laws when he ordered aides in 1994 to shred a list identifying dozens of Philadelphia-area priests suspected of molesting children, an expert on canon law and clergy sex abuse testified Thursday. "That was like obstructing justice cubed," the Rev. Thomas P. Doyle told a Common Pleas Court jury. "He's got a list of men who may have abused children - and he's going to shred it?" The assertion thrust the late cardinal squarely into the spotlight for the first time in the landmark child-sex-abuse and endangerment trial against his former secretary for clergy, Msgr.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clergy sex-abuse scandal that so dominated the last decade of Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua's life may well dominate public perception of his legacy, some observers say. His friends and colleagues, however, described the retired archbishop of Philadelphia, who died Tuesday at age 88, as a "behind-the-scenes" prelate who did much of his best work out of public view. Bishop Joseph Galante, head of the Diocese of Camden, on Wednesday described Bevilacqua as having been a "leading advocate for assistance for immigrants at a time when society was not as conscious of their needs.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware County's corps of constables is up for election this year along with other municipal and school board officials, but not everybody seems to give a hoot. Of the 90 or so constable positions listed on the various November ballots, six are without candidates on either the Democrat or Republican side. Political leaders in some of these towns say there isn't a lot of interest. Little wonder. Of the estimated 102 constables elected in the county's 49 municipalities, only a handful make a living at their jobs.
NEWS
May 20, 2012
NAACP gives OK to gay marriage The NAACP board of directors voted Saturday to endorse the right to same-sex marriage, adding the voice of the nation's leading black civil rights organization to a debate that has divided the African American community. The decision has implications for President Obama, who needs a big turnout from black voters to help him win reelection but angered some African American church pastors with his announcement this month that he believes gays and lesbians should have the right to marry.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Edward L. Ciemniecki, 59, a partner with the Archer & Greiner law firm's Philadelphia office and an usher at Christ the King Roman Catholic Church, died of stomach cancer Thursday at his home in Haddonfield. Most recently, Mr. Ciemniecki practiced civil law at Archer & Greiner after the firm acquired Pelino & Lentz of Philadelphia, where he previously worked. Mr. Ciemniecki was active in his church and with Haddonfield's sports programs, especially as a past president of the Haddonfield Football Booster Club.
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NEWS
May 12, 2016
By Milad Emam For the past six years, Elizabeth Young has been living an American nightmare. Philadelphia police officers showed up at her house and tried to seize her home and car because her son sold $90 worth of marijuana outside her home. Young was never charged with a crime, yet she was soon caught up in Philadelphia's civil-forfeiture machine. With the deck stacked against her, Young went to Philadelphia's criminal justice center and fought to get her property back, arguing that she was an innocent owner because she did not know her son was dealing drugs, having been hospitalized during that time.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
KATY PERRY may get her convent after all. California Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant said yesterday he believes a group of elderly nuns improperly sold their hilltop convent to entrepreneur Dana Hollister , but the judge delayed any efforts by church officials to finalize a competing sale by the archdiocese to Katy. Yesterday's mixed ruling by Chalfant will tie up the once-lavish estate in months of litigation. While the judge preliminarily ruled that Hollister's purchase of the convent is invalid, he ordered her to pay $25,000 a month to support the nuns and denied reps from Perry or Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez access to the convent during the dispute.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia prosecutors agreed Thursday to halt efforts to seize the homes of two of the lead plaintiffs in a widely publicized federal suit challenging the city's use of civil forfeiture laws in drug cases. But Christos Sourovelis and Doila Welch, both of whom saw their houses threatened after police arrested a relative dealing drugs on their properties, said they intended to keep on fighting. In agreements of dismissal filed in Common Pleas Court, the District Attorney's Office agreed to drop its cases against properties owned by Sourovelis and Welch as long as both owners took "reasonable measures" to ensure no further drug crimes occurred there.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack C. Briscoe, 94, of Drexel Hill, a longtime Philadelphia lawyer and a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, died Monday, Dec. 1, of heart failure at the Sunrise of Granite Run senior living home in Media. Born in 1920 in Bradford, Pa., Mr. Briscoe was the son of an oil industry worker, Park H., and a homemaker, Gertrude. Mr. Briscoe graduated from Bradford High School in 1937 before attending the University of Pennsylvania. To help pay for the cost of tuition, Mr. Briscoe worked as a locomotive fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad Seashore Line.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Edward L. Ciemniecki, 59, a partner with the Archer & Greiner law firm's Philadelphia office and an usher at Christ the King Roman Catholic Church, died of stomach cancer Thursday at his home in Haddonfield. Most recently, Mr. Ciemniecki practiced civil law at Archer & Greiner after the firm acquired Pelino & Lentz of Philadelphia, where he previously worked. Mr. Ciemniecki was active in his church and with Haddonfield's sports programs, especially as a past president of the Haddonfield Football Booster Club.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael J. Melody Jr., 80, of Exton, a Chester County Common Pleas Court judge for 22 years, died of pneumonia on Thursday, May 17, at St. Martha Manor in Downingtown, a skilled-nursing home owned by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Melody graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1950, earned a bachelor's degree at what is now St. Joseph's University in 1954, and graduated in 1957 from what is now Georgetown University Law Center. Until 1959, he served in the Army.
NEWS
May 20, 2012
NAACP gives OK to gay marriage The NAACP board of directors voted Saturday to endorse the right to same-sex marriage, adding the voice of the nation's leading black civil rights organization to a debate that has divided the African American community. The decision has implications for President Obama, who needs a big turnout from black voters to help him win reelection but angered some African American church pastors with his announcement this month that he believes gays and lesbians should have the right to marry.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writers
Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua broke civil and church laws when he ordered aides in 1994 to shred a list identifying dozens of Philadelphia-area priests suspected of molesting children, an expert on canon law and clergy sex abuse testified Thursday. "That was like obstructing justice cubed," the Rev. Thomas P. Doyle told a Common Pleas Court jury. "He's got a list of men who may have abused children - and he's going to shred it?" The assertion thrust the late cardinal squarely into the spotlight for the first time in the landmark child-sex-abuse and endangerment trial against his former secretary for clergy, Msgr.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clergy sex-abuse scandal that so dominated the last decade of Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua's life may well dominate public perception of his legacy, some observers say. His friends and colleagues, however, described the retired archbishop of Philadelphia, who died Tuesday at age 88, as a "behind-the-scenes" prelate who did much of his best work out of public view. Bishop Joseph Galante, head of the Diocese of Camden, on Wednesday described Bevilacqua as having been a "leading advocate for assistance for immigrants at a time when society was not as conscious of their needs.
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