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Civil Rights Movement

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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The year 1989 - bicentennial of the French Revolution and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the codification of the American Revolution - may be commemorated in 2089. That year may be the centennial of a regime-toppling echo of Occidental revolutions in the Orient. Chinese protesters speak Jefferson's, Lincoln's and Thoreau's words, and have built a small copy of the Statue of Liberty, underscoring the relative sterility of the French Revolution as a source of vocabulary and symbols.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | BY J. ANTHONY LUKAS, From the New York Times
As Anita Hill's tale seemed about to wreak havoc with Clarence Thomas' nomination, the Republican attack squad on the Judiciary Committee was quick to blame the civil rights movement. According to Sen. Orrin Hatch, "slick lawyers - the worst kind," working for black and liberal "interest groups," had concocted the story of sexual harassment and maneuvered it onto TV. But in the wake of Thomas' confirmation these same senators and their White House allies did an abrupt reversal, arguing instead that the movement was impotent, suggesting it may never again regain its clout on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
August 29, 2010
A few words about who "we" is. "This is a moment," said Glenn Beck three months ago on his radio program, "... that I think we 'reclaim' the civil rights movement. It has been so distorted and so turned upside down. ... We are on the right side of history. We are on the side of individual freedoms and liberties and damn it, we will reclaim the civil rights moment. We will take that movement, because we were the people that did it in the first place!" Beck was promoting his "Restoring Honor" rally, held this weekend at the Lincoln Memorial, 47 years to the day after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously spoke there.
NEWS
February 1, 2006 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For 37 years after the death of her husband, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King faithfully followed the dream. She was a widow, but she remained wedded to nonviolence, which was the bedrock of the civil rights movement. Throughout the 13 years of King's public life, Coretta King was more than a wife, more than a mother; she was a full partner in the King civil rights firm that became the core of their existence.
NEWS
February 25, 2002 | By Lillian Swanson
Forty years have passed since Etta Mason gave birth in a tent on a winter night that was so cold the family dog froze to death. It took that many years for her story to be told, as well as the stories of other black sharecroppers who were pushed off white-owned farmland because they dared to register to vote. Most of the sharecroppers' misery; months of lunch counter sit-ins; a bus boycott, and dozens of arrests never made the local paper when they happened in 1960. That's because the Jackson Sun - like some other small Southern papers - failed to cover the civil-rights movement in its own backyard.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
On what would have been Julian Bond's 76th birthday, more than 200 people gathered Thursday at Lincoln University to celebrate the life and legacy of a prominent leader of the civil rights movement. Bond, who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1960 and served as a chairman of the NAACP, was the son of Lincoln University's first black president, Horace Mann Bond. Bond was 5 when his father took the job and he spent his childhood on the campus. Lincoln, the country's first degree-granting historically black college or university, awarded him an honorary degree in 1970.
NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
At age 89, Harris Wofford is no stranger to large crowds of idealists working to change the status quo. He was a good friend of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., helped found the Peace Corps, and was a civil rights pioneer. And yet, Pennsylvania's liberal statesman was inspired Monday, two generations later, as he looked upon several thousand people gathered at Girard College for the Martin Luther King Day of Service, which Wofford had helped found several decades after King's assassination.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now-aging firebrands who endured fear and pain to desegregate Girard College 50 years ago walked smiling past its imposing stone walls Friday. They were greeted on the steps of Founder's Hall by red-blazered students - mostly minorities - who applauded, then sang for the 10 so-called freedom fighters, whose efforts opened the school for the very kids who were honoring them. "We are your legacy," senior Brandon Dixon, a national scholarship winner bound for Harvard, told the one-time demonstrators, one of whom cried openly.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the National Constitution Center, they read the "I Have a Dream" speech and sang the anthem of the civil rights movement. When they were done, their listeners cheered - and wept. A group of 13 actors and high school students presented a dramatic reading of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s famed speech before about 125 people. Each read several lines of the speech, first delivered exactly 50 years earlier. They recited other passages in unison. "When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir," they said.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist Julian Bond, who died Saturday, was born in Tennessee but moved to Pennsylvania as a boy. In 1945, his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University in Chester County, according to the university website. The elder Bond served Lincoln, his alma mater, until 1957. Julian Bond graduated in 1957 from George School, a private Quaker high school near Newtown, Bucks County. "We were shocked and saddened to hear of Julian's death," said George head of school Nancy Starmer.
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NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
At age 89, Harris Wofford is no stranger to large crowds of idealists working to change the status quo. He was a good friend of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., helped found the Peace Corps, and was a civil rights pioneer. And yet, Pennsylvania's liberal statesman was inspired Monday, two generations later, as he looked upon several thousand people gathered at Girard College for the Martin Luther King Day of Service, which Wofford had helped found several decades after King's assassination.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
This weekend, more than 50 years after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote one of the most important texts of the civil rights movement while locked in a Birmingham, Ala., jail cell, actors will read excerpts from that missive inside a now-closed Philadelphia prison. Dr. King's words then - including the rallying lines "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly" - are "extraordinarily relevant in today's world," said Sean Kelley, director of public programing for Eastern State Penitentiary.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
On what would have been Julian Bond's 76th birthday, more than 200 people gathered Thursday at Lincoln University to celebrate the life and legacy of a prominent leader of the civil rights movement. Bond, who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1960 and served as a chairman of the NAACP, was the son of Lincoln University's first black president, Horace Mann Bond. Bond was 5 when his father took the job and he spent his childhood on the campus. Lincoln, the country's first degree-granting historically black college or university, awarded him an honorary degree in 1970.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Tuesday revived a lawsuit challenging the New York Police Department's post-9/11 surveillance of Muslim religious and civic groups, comparing the program to other dark moments of race-based government monitoring in America's past. "We have been down similar roads before," Circuit Judge Thomas Ambro wrote for a three-judge panel of the Philadelphia-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. "Jewish Americans during the Red Scare, African Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, and Japanese Americans during World War II are examples that readily spring to mind.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It has become a cliché to say that someone will be missed after his death. But the expression becomes more meaningful in reference to former Philadelphia NAACP president J. Whyatt "Jerry" Mondesire, who died Sunday after suffering a brain aneurysm. Mondesire represented a vanishing breed of street-savvy civil rights leaders whose in-your-face style could not be ignored. In that regard, he was often compared to the late Cecil B. Moore, who led Philadelphia's civil rights movement during the turbulent 1960s.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist Julian Bond, who died Saturday, was born in Tennessee but moved to Pennsylvania as a boy. In 1945, his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University in Chester County, according to the university website. The elder Bond served Lincoln, his alma mater, until 1957. Julian Bond graduated in 1957 from George School, a private Quaker high school near Newtown, Bucks County. "We were shocked and saddened to hear of Julian's death," said George head of school Nancy Starmer.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A vocal duo's flawless a cappella rendition of "Over the Rainbow" hushed the crowd outside Independence Hall as the reenactment of a pioneering LGBT civil rights demonstration began. Several dozen people marched along Chestnut Street holding placards ("Equality for Homosexual Citizens") that replicated those carried by a plucky group of gay men and lesbians a half-century earlier. It was an emotional, and pitch-perfect, way to celebrate the Fourth of July - and the fact that marriage equality is at last the law of the land.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now-aging firebrands who endured fear and pain to desegregate Girard College 50 years ago walked smiling past its imposing stone walls Friday. They were greeted on the steps of Founder's Hall by red-blazered students - mostly minorities - who applauded, then sang for the 10 so-called freedom fighters, whose efforts opened the school for the very kids who were honoring them. "We are your legacy," senior Brandon Dixon, a national scholarship winner bound for Harvard, told the one-time demonstrators, one of whom cried openly.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most important figures in the civil-rights movement was stopped from speaking at the historic March on Washington and has spent the last half-century in virtual obscurity. But a month before that 1963 march, it was Gloria Richardson, a full-time mother who kept guns in her house, seated next to U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy during the signing of the historic "Treaty of Cambridge. " As the leader of a group that became a national model for the likes of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the burgeoning black power movement, she was instrumental in brokering that agreement, which lay the groundwork for desegregation in an Eastern Shore town in Maryland.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Many events will mark this year's 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. One of the most poignant occurred last month, when Holocaust survivors returned to Poland to commemorate their release from the Auschwitz concentration camp. The horrors they suffered are recounted in a new HBO documentary, Night Will Fall , which, like Selma, the theatrical film depicting a seminal moment in the civil rights movement, should be seen by a much wider audience. Night Will Fall includes footage of Holocaust victims being freed and details the depravities of their Nazi captors.
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