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Civil Rights Movement

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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The year 1989 - bicentennial of the French Revolution and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the codification of the American Revolution - may be commemorated in 2089. That year may be the centennial of a regime-toppling echo of Occidental revolutions in the Orient. Chinese protesters speak Jefferson's, Lincoln's and Thoreau's words, and have built a small copy of the Statue of Liberty, underscoring the relative sterility of the French Revolution as a source of vocabulary and symbols.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | BY J. ANTHONY LUKAS, From the New York Times
As Anita Hill's tale seemed about to wreak havoc with Clarence Thomas' nomination, the Republican attack squad on the Judiciary Committee was quick to blame the civil rights movement. According to Sen. Orrin Hatch, "slick lawyers - the worst kind," working for black and liberal "interest groups," had concocted the story of sexual harassment and maneuvered it onto TV. But in the wake of Thomas' confirmation these same senators and their White House allies did an abrupt reversal, arguing instead that the movement was impotent, suggesting it may never again regain its clout on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
August 29, 2010
A few words about who "we" is. "This is a moment," said Glenn Beck three months ago on his radio program, "... that I think we 'reclaim' the civil rights movement. It has been so distorted and so turned upside down. ... We are on the right side of history. We are on the side of individual freedoms and liberties and damn it, we will reclaim the civil rights moment. We will take that movement, because we were the people that did it in the first place!" Beck was promoting his "Restoring Honor" rally, held this weekend at the Lincoln Memorial, 47 years to the day after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously spoke there.
NEWS
February 1, 2006 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For 37 years after the death of her husband, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King faithfully followed the dream. She was a widow, but she remained wedded to nonviolence, which was the bedrock of the civil rights movement. Throughout the 13 years of King's public life, Coretta King was more than a wife, more than a mother; she was a full partner in the King civil rights firm that became the core of their existence.
NEWS
February 25, 2002 | By Lillian Swanson
Forty years have passed since Etta Mason gave birth in a tent on a winter night that was so cold the family dog froze to death. It took that many years for her story to be told, as well as the stories of other black sharecroppers who were pushed off white-owned farmland because they dared to register to vote. Most of the sharecroppers' misery; months of lunch counter sit-ins; a bus boycott, and dozens of arrests never made the local paper when they happened in 1960. That's because the Jackson Sun - like some other small Southern papers - failed to cover the civil-rights movement in its own backyard.
SPORTS
August 8, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
"I wasn't raised to run. " In May, Jim Schwartz made a PowerPoint presentation to the Eagles defense on civil rights activist Fred Shuttlesworth. "He told us the day before and I was like, 'OK, this is a joke.' I thought he was just joking," cornerback Eric Rowe said. "But the next day he came with it and he was giving facts, details and pictures. " Most, if not all, of the players had never heard of Shuttlesworth, which was sort of Schwartz's point. Martin Luther King Jr.?
NEWS
August 29, 2016
Emily Hess is a visiting assistant professor of history and an academic adviser for the Ashbrook Center's master of arts in American history and government program at Ashland University in Ohio Fifty-three years ago, on Aug. 28, 1963, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave one of the most iconic speeches in American history at the March on Washington. King's masterly speech drew on America's founding documents - the Constitution and Declaration of Independence - which, according to King, promised "the riches of freedom and the security of justice" to all Americans.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Momma may have said, "Never ask a lady about her age. " That goes double for Judith "Judee" von Seldeneck, chair and founder of Diversified Search L.L.C., one of the nation's largest executive search firms. In Philadelphia, some of the region's top executives - Vikram Dewan at the Philadelphia Zoo and former Tasty Baking CEO Charles Pizzi - got their jobs through Diversified, which von Seldeneck began in 1974. "I'm not going to tell you" my age, she said. "I've got a thing about that.
NEWS
August 27, 2013
A FEW DAYS before its 50th anniversary, we think of the March on Washington, and the civil-rights movement that it embodied, as a triumph of democracy. In the grand sense, this is true. Protest is by no means exclusive to democracies, but it's more at home in a democratic system than any other. The civil-rights movement extended the promise of democracy to many who had been denied it. But there were also aspects of the movement's victories that could be spun as undemocratic. Many Southern whites decried the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as an imposition of external values on the majorities of residents in their states (the internal value they were protecting, of course, was the right to discriminate)
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
The controversy that engulfed the Rev. Ralph David Abernathy in his final years may overshadow the strong role he played in leading the nation into a new era of racial tolerance, colleagues in the civil rights movement said yesterday. Abernathy, who died at 64 in Atlanta yesterday, was the man who picked the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to lead the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott that turned into a national civil rights movement. And it was Abernathy, say those who knew him, who stood at King's side as confidant and adviser throughout the movement until King's tragic assassination in 1968.
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NEWS
September 13, 2016
By Kevin C. Peterson While Donald Trump's support is seemingly surging among Republican and disaffected white voters, Hillary Clinton is gradually realizing she has a problem among the black electorate, particularly post-Civil Rights movement African Americans. That could spell disaster for Clinton in November, because to win she needs a robust turnout from black Americans in all generational demographics - from John Lewis' to John Legend's, from Marian Wright Edelman's to Mary Mary's.
NEWS
August 29, 2016
Emily Hess is a visiting assistant professor of history and an academic adviser for the Ashbrook Center's master of arts in American history and government program at Ashland University in Ohio Fifty-three years ago, on Aug. 28, 1963, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave one of the most iconic speeches in American history at the March on Washington. King's masterly speech drew on America's founding documents - the Constitution and Declaration of Independence - which, according to King, promised "the riches of freedom and the security of justice" to all Americans.
SPORTS
August 8, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
"I wasn't raised to run. " In May, Jim Schwartz made a PowerPoint presentation to the Eagles defense on civil rights activist Fred Shuttlesworth. "He told us the day before and I was like, 'OK, this is a joke.' I thought he was just joking," cornerback Eric Rowe said. "But the next day he came with it and he was giving facts, details and pictures. " Most, if not all, of the players had never heard of Shuttlesworth, which was sort of Schwartz's point. Martin Luther King Jr.?
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Robert Regan, 86, of Philadelphia, a retired University of Pennsylvania English professor whose affinity for literature about the struggles of American life was rooted in his own challenging childhood, died of heart failure Tuesday, July 5, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Regan, an expert in the works of such consequential authors as Mark Twain and Flannery O'Connor, found solace in his school studies as a boy growing up in poverty in Shreveport, La. The son of a single parent, he helped his mother operate a country store sandwiched between poor black and white neighborhoods.
NEWS
June 8, 2016
By Chris Coons Last week, I led a group of my colleagues on a trip to South Africa. Along with Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.), a hero of America's civil rights movement, and Kerry Kennedy, president of RFK Human Rights and daughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, we traveled to South Africa to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the senator's historic "Ripples of Hope" speech at the University of Cape Town. On June 6, 1966, speaking to a nation struggling through the cruel injustices of apartheid, Kennedy began his speech by describing "a land in which the native inhabitants were at first subdued, but relations with whom remain a problem to this day; a land which defined itself on a hostile frontier; . . . a land which was once the importer of slaves, and now must struggle to wipe out the last traces of that former bondage.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
JOHN N. SMALLWOOD SR., my father, enlisted in the United States Army in August 1956 - just two months after he graduated from Carver High School in Baltimore. He loves America and proudly served for 22 years. Muhammad Ali was his man. He made sure Ali was my guy, too. Until Ali died at the age of 74 on Friday, I never thought to ask my father how someone who voluntarily signed up to protect this country could be so supportive of a man who had effectively dodged the military draft.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin and Stephan Salisbury, STAFF WRITERS
It has been a little more than four years since the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., and the resulting bubbling-over of U.S. racial and political tensions for all the world to see. "It was the shot heard around the world," playwright Thomas Soto says. At the time, he and Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj - who was recently appointed guest artistic director for the 49th season of New Freedom Theatre in Philadelphia - were in New York. "We were trying to find ways to [channel]
NEWS
April 20, 2016
When I spoke with Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton in an exclusive interview that aired on my radio show Monday morning, I expected to speak with someone who was guarded, defensive and restrained. In many ways, she is exactly that, but I can't blame her. Clinton endured scandal and embarrassment while forgiving her husband's imperfections. She has shouldered blame for decisions she did not make, and in between, she has made deadly mistakes of her own. Benghazi comes to mind.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Momma may have said, "Never ask a lady about her age. " That goes double for Judith "Judee" von Seldeneck, chair and founder of Diversified Search L.L.C., one of the nation's largest executive search firms. In Philadelphia, some of the region's top executives - Vikram Dewan at the Philadelphia Zoo and former Tasty Baking CEO Charles Pizzi - got their jobs through Diversified, which von Seldeneck began in 1974. "I'm not going to tell you" my age, she said. "I've got a thing about that.
TRAVEL
February 14, 2016
Bevy of brews Maryland. Local breweries bring love-inspired craft beers to this festival. Try chocolate-infused creations, a pilsner made with rose petals, Romantic Chemistry IPA and, appropriate to the location, Boardwalk Blonde. Live music. Minimum age 21. Shore Craft Beer Fest , Ocean City, Feb. 20. Under the sea Connecticut. Two exhibits explore the ocean's beauty through paintings of remarkable underwater environments and photographs of deep-sea creatures taken by robots.
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