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Civil Service Commission

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NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Hatboro police officer Robert A. Ottey Jr. will appear before the Civil Service Commission next week to appeal his dismissal from the police force for improper conduct. Ottey was arrested in January and charged with drunken driving after he struck two parked cars with his pickup truck. He subsequently was suspended from the police force and would have been eligible to resume his job if he had completed a court-ordered rehabilitation program and had, after one year of faultless behavior, received the approval of the Borough Council and the police chief, Frank L. Campbell.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Marie Green, Special to The Inquirer
The outspoken solicitor for Bristol Township's outspoken Civil Service Commission has been fired after statements he made became part of a civil rights suit a black police officer recently filed against the township. Township council, following a 45-minute closed session Tuesday night, voted to replace solicitor Martin King and hire Newtown attorney Marc Rickles to represent the three-member civil service commission. In a related action, the council also voted to fire police officer George Davish, who has been under suspension for allegedly shooting himself last month and fabricating a story about being attacked by a burglar.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Over the repeated objections of Bristol Township attorneys, fired Police Officer Jerry Rogowyi took the stand in Bucks County Court yesterday to describe for Judge John J. Rufe why he believed police officials held a grudge against him before he was dismissed from the force. Rufe is considering Rogowyi's appeal of a township Civil Service Commission ruling, which determined in August that the Police Department was correct in firing Rogowyi for stealing a two-ounce chunk of crack cocaine from a crime scene and for having oral sex with a prostitute in his patrol car. Before he was accused of the crimes, which Rogowyi denied, he testified yesterday that he had been subjected to discriminatory treatment by his supervisors.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the moment John F. Timoney landed in Philadelphia to shake the cobwebs out of the Philadelphia Police Department, he has asked for the ability to look outside the city for the best possible hires. Now it looks as if he's going to get it - at least partly. In a surprising turn of events at a City Council hearing yesterday, City Personnel Director Linda Seyda said she would work with Timoney to craft a proposal that the city's Civil Service Commission modify the pre-employment residency requirement as it applies to military personnel.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF @NEW HOPE
Defying Borough Council orders, two ousted members of the New Hope Civil Service Commission met last night and, with a third member, voted unanimously to reinstate Robert Brobson as New Hope police chief. Elaine Seeb and Chris Bollenbacher, who were removed by the Borough Council in July, joined commission member Frank Schmauk in moving to reinstate the fired Brobson, whose case they were considering before they were themselves fired. The 30 or so residents who gathered at the renegade meeting at the Eagle Fire Company hall stood up to applaud Brobson, who attended with his lawyer, Dean Ibrahim.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In early December, the Borough Council forwarded Detective James Dougherty's name to the Civil Service Commission as its choice for police chief and asked the newly formed body to act quickly on the appointment. But nearly a month has passed, and it doesn't look as if the commission will be able to get to Dougherty anytime soon. That's because the commission has to put its own house in order first. "The past Civil Service Commission never kept records, and never kept a listing of their rules and regulations current," said Commission Vice Chairman Terrence Tinneny.
NEWS
October 17, 1995 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Politicians here have never been known to lick their wounds and slink away after a loss. And in that tradition, a majority of the Borough Council has asked Montgomery County Court Judge Bernard A. Moore to reconsider his Oct. 2 ruling giving Mayor Jack Salamone - not the council - the power to appoint local Civil Service Commission members. At first, Moore's decision was touted as the resolution of a six-month-long power struggle that embittered the local government and paralyzed police hiring.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's a humble office, and those who serve meet infrequently and receive no pay. Yet in New Hope, the battle over who makes up the borough Civil Service Commission has reached the point where there are two such groups, and which is the real one depends on whom you ask. Elaine Seeb and Chris Bollenbacher, two commissioners dismissed last month by the Borough Council, say they plan to continue their duties, even though the council voted in...
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Montgomery County Court ruling has effectively invalidated the five- member borough Civil Service Commission, much to the glee of local police officers, who have mounted legal challenges to the commission in several lawsuits filed by the local Fraternal Order of Police. But outgoing Mayor William DeAngelis says he will not only appeal the court's decision, but also will name Public Safety Director Thomas Stone police chief - a move that may give the lame-duck Democrat the last laugh.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The skirmishing has been going on for months, but this week New Hope finally declared war on itself. Interested residents who trooped up to Doylestown yesterday were treated to the spectacle of two borough-paid lawyers squaring off against each other in Bucks County Court over the fate of the former borough police chief. As they sat around the lobby of the courthouse during a midafternoon break, sipping weak vending-machine coffee and idly discussing the case, the most common adjectives tossed about were "ludicrous," "insane" and "bizarre.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Borine, 92, a Cheltenham Township commissioner and a fund-raiser for Jewish causes, died of heart failure Monday, Feb. 23, at his home in Cheltenham. Mr. Borine was the owner of Capital Brokerage Co., a food brokerage in Philadelphia. He retired in 1988, leaving the business to his son. He was most widely known, however, for the volunteer work he did over the years on behalf of Jewish agencies and causes at the local and national levels. Mr. Borine served as a campaign chairman for the Philadelphia Allied Jewish Appeal and as an officer of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey Democrats are seeking to invalidate new rules adopted by the Christie administration that they say threaten to upend the foundation of the state's civil service system. The state Civil Service Commission, composed of Christie appointees, last month adopted rules that changed the process by which employees in the executive branch are promoted. After taking initial exams to enter civil service, government employees are organized into so-called job bands, groupings of titles for those with similar duties and responsibilities.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey public employees are bracing for what their union leaders say is the latest anti-worker onslaught by the Christie administration. The New Jersey Civil Service Commission, all of whose members are Gov. Christie's appointees, has proposed sweeping changes it says would streamline the promotion process, making it easier to advance top-notch people. That's not how the unions see it. They say the changes would invite cronyism and political favoritism, discouraging state, county, and municipal workers who don't want to play politics.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IN BETWEEN compiling a sizable rap sheet and murdering the mother of his 6-year-old daughter last weekend, Anthony Serody got appointed this year to the commission that oversees the testing of new police officers in Folcroft Borough after working for the Delaware County Democrats. Police say Serody, 38, forced his way into his ex-girlfriend's apartment in Prospect Park on Sunday and shot her in the face and chest. Jennifer Corrado, 31, was pronounced dead at the scene. Serody later shot himself in the head on Mario Lanza Boulevard in Southwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's plan to lay off all of its uniformed police officers has been approved by the New Jersey Civil Service Commission, setting the stage for replacing the Police Department with a new county-run force. Mayor Dana L. Redd also announced Wednesday that the layoffs of about 270 officers are now tentatively set for April 30. "We cannot sit back and allow our children and families to experience another 2012. We have an opportunity to improve public safety by bringing back community policing and adding more law enforcement officers to patrol our neighborhoods and business corridors," Redd said in a statement.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
The president of a municipal union filed a request Tuesday in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court for a temporary restraining order to stop Mayor Nutter from imposing salary and benefit conditions on 856 employees until the public can file objections. Michael J. Walsh, president of AFSCME Local 2186, representing supervisors in departments including Health, Human Services, the Free Library, and Parks and Recreation, argued that the pay and benefit changes should have been available for public comment for 30 days and then heard by the Civil Service Commission.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's Civil Service Commission on Wednesday approved a raft of changes to overtime, furlough, and other work regulations, giving Mayor Nutter a small victory in his effort to wring savings from the workforce. The changes, which still face hurdles before implementation, would affect about 900 "first level supervisors" represented by AFSCME Local 2186. The local is part of District Council 47, the white-collar municipal workers union, but does not have the same collective bargaining rights as the rest of the union.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
TRENTON - Efforts to dismantle Camden's police department and replace it with a new county-run force got a critical boost Wednesday when the state Civil Service Commission granted the planned new force a temporary waiver from strict rules on hiring officers. The decision allows Camden County to opt out of civil-service rules for 12 months so it can more quickly hire an estimated 400 officers. Commission Chairman Robert M. Czech said the waiver facilitated "alternative personnel approaches" needed for elected officials to carry out their plan to try to lower Camden's high crime rate.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsauken Township officials have notified the state of their intention to lay off 12 police officers in December, the New Jersey Civil Service Commission said Friday. Mayor Jack Killion, who is facing reelection next month, said, however, that the township was in negotiations with the police union and hoped to avoid the layoffs through salary and benefits cuts. "I don't want to see anyone lose their job," he said. "We've been down this road before, and the union has been willing to work with us. Hopefully, that will be the case this time.
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