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SPORTS
March 9, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Retired Oakland Raiders linebacker Bill Romanowski nearly came to tears on the witness stand yesterday as he explained the difficulty of being a family man and somebody who plays a "violent, violent game. " Romanowski, who played 16 years in the NFL, including two with the Eagles, is the defendant in a civil trial. He is accused of punching tight end Marcus Williams during practice, ending the 27-year-old's short-lived NFL career and causing brain damage when his eye socket was crushed.
SPORTS
August 20, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
After two false starts in the personal-injury lawsuit against Dallas Cowboys star Deion Sanders, the civil trial opened yesterday with jury selection and opening statements in a Cincinnati courtroom. Sanders is being sued for $1 million by Riverfront Stadium security guard Herbert Kohus over a dispute after a Cincinnati Reds game two years ago. Judge Robert Kraft of Hamilton County Common Pleas Court delayed the trial twice last week after Sanders didn't show and then "had urgent family matters" that prevented him from coming.
NEWS
May 21, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
After months and months - 32 to be exact - of filing endless motions, of sanctions, of wild accusations and testy depositions, the celebrity TV-anchor case of Alycia Lane v. Larry Mendte got raptured up yesterday. Well, something like that. Actually, the case of Lane v. Mendte and CBS Broadcasting was merely put on hold again, thanks to a last-minute stay moments before jury selection was to proceed in the much-anticipated civil trial involving the former CBS 3 co-anchors. "We were ready to go," said Lane's attorney, Paul Rosen.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | By Jon Stenzler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was a holiday tradition turned tragic. For more than a decade, members of the Chesilhurst Volunteer Fire Company would ride through the borough in a fire truck and hand out candy canes to children. On the evening of Dec. 23, 1997, that tradition came to an end when an 11-year-old boy was struck and killed by a sport-utility vehicle while crossing a street to join two friends after receiving his treat. Now, almost 2 1/2 years after Noreen and Charles Robinson lost their only child, Charles Jr., they hope their lawsuit accusing the borough and its officials of negligence will help ease their pain and clarify the facts of the accident.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Common Pleas Court judge ruled yesterday that a Philadelphia woman received a fair civil trial two years ago even though the trial judge presiding over her case talked on the phone, walked around the courtroom, and climbed on a table in front of the jury. Judge Alfred J. DiBona Jr., who had the unusual task of sitting in judgment of a colleague, said in a 17-page opinion that retired Judge Marvin R. Halbert's behavior did not interfere with proceedings during the 1998 trial. DiBona noted that Halbert's conduct "may be deemed unconventional.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge has denied a motion by lawyers for real estate speculator Richard Basciano to move the Sept. 6 civil trial in the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse out of Southeastern Pennsylvania because of pretrial publicity. The one-page order, without explanation, was filed Tuesday by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina. She is the newly appointed trial judge for the consolidated lawsuits resulting from the June 13, 2013, collapse of an unsupported and partly demolished wall.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who presided over the landmark 2012 Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial has been assigned to handle what is expected to be the biggest civil trial in years - the Sept. 6 trial of lawsuits from the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse. Court records show Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina was assigned Thursday to preside over what is expected to be a four-week jury trial of suits against real estate speculator Richard Basciano, several of his companies, the Salvation Army, and others on behalf of six people killed and 13 injured June 5, 2013.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy , Daily News Staff Writer
They'll probably never lay eyes on Ira Einhorn, but during the next several days, these six Philadelphians will decide his financial future. Five men and one woman were selected yesterday to serve as jurors in the civil trial against Einhorn. They must decide how much the famous fugitive should pay to compensate for killing his girlfriend, Holly Maddux. "Your function here is not to find him guilty or not guilty, but to assess damages," lawyer James Beasley told the jury pool yesterday.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
After a 10-month criminal trial, a predominantly black jury finds O.J. Simpson innocent of two murders. After a two-month civil trial, a predominantly white jury finds him guilty. America shudders, and the enormous racial gulf the larger-than-life case has exposed grows even wider. Simpson's lawyers are to go on the offensive today as they begin to present their case to a jury of nine whites, one black and two other people in a Santa Monica courtroom. But after six weeks of damaging testimony against the former football great, the disingenuous answers he provided on the witness stand, and the lower standard the civil jury will use in reaching a verdict, it appears that an acquittal - which in this case means being found not financially liable for the murders - is less likely.
NEWS
July 15, 2003 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new, high-tech courtroom on the sixth floor of City Hall is being inaugurated this week with a civil-negligence trial involving a former West Point cadet injured at the 1998 Army-Navy game. Kevin Galligan, who suffered a fractured vertebra and a sprained wrist when a railing collapsed at Veterans Stadium, is suing the city, which owns the stadium; the handrail manufacturer; and a stadium security company for monetary damages. The trial, which is in the jury-selection phase, will be in the most modern chamber in the Philadelphia court system.
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NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge has denied a motion by lawyers for real estate speculator Richard Basciano to move the Sept. 6 civil trial in the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse out of Southeastern Pennsylvania because of pretrial publicity. The one-page order, without explanation, was filed Tuesday by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina. She is the newly appointed trial judge for the consolidated lawsuits resulting from the June 13, 2013, collapse of an unsupported and partly demolished wall.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who presided over the landmark 2012 Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial has been assigned to handle what is expected to be the biggest civil trial in years - the Sept. 6 trial of lawsuits from the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse. Court records show Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina was assigned Thursday to preside over what is expected to be a four-week jury trial of suits against real estate speculator Richard Basciano, several of his companies, the Salvation Army, and others on behalf of six people killed and 13 injured June 5, 2013.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
In 2014, Kareem Alleyne was acquitted of killing an off-duty Philadelphia police officer by hitting him with his car. On Monday, Alleyne's lawyers told a jury that he never should have been charged with vehicular homicide in the first place. They said police investigators overlooked or downplayed damning evidence against their deceased colleague, including that the officer, Marc Brady, had been stalking and harassing Alleyne for dating his ex-girlfriend. "They had made up their minds," said lawyer Lori Mach.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Salma's canine rage Salma Hayek is deeply distressed and angry that police in the Washington state hamlet where she keeps a ranch have closed their investigation into the shooting death of Mozart Hayek without making an arrest, TMZ says. Mozart, a 9-year-old pet dog, was shot and killed by a neighbor for allegedly trespassing on the adjoining property. The actor was so determined to investigate the death, she had a necropsy performed. Death was caused by a pellet gun. Hayek insists Mozart never crossed onto the other property, but the caretaker of her ranch told cops that's not strictly true.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
When Mark Calzaretta watches a jury hearing evidence in a high-stakes lawsuit, it isn't necessarily an impartial panel of citizen peers he sees. Rather, Calzaretta sees 10 human beings with emotional biases that, if studied diligently, can help lawyers predict with startling accuracy the outcome of a case, often before it is tried. Calzaretta is a founding member of Magna Legal Services, a Center City firm that specializes in modeling juror behavior for lawyers who want to squeeze every advantage out of their arguments.
NEWS
February 6, 2016
Rafael Robb, the former University of Pennsylvania professor sentenced to five to 10 years in prison for killing his wife in their Upper Merion home in 2006, is again coming up for parole - and stirring a new round of opposition. Ellen Gregory Robb's family members, who have successfully argued in the past to reverse a parole board decision to release Robb, plan to renew their concerns in a meeting with the board next Tuesday. "We will collectively show that Robb remains controlling, manipulative, and unremorseful for his horrific actions," her brother Gary Gregory said in a statement Thursday.
NEWS
February 5, 2016
BILL COSBY'S LUCK ran out on a dark and rainy Wednesday in a Norristown courthouse. He lost the legal battle, but I suspect, unhappily, that he will win the war. Common Pleas Judge Steven O'Neill nixed Cosby's motion to dismiss the sexual-assault charges brought against him in December. The 78-year-old entertainer argued that he was shielded by a promise to not prosecute made a decade ago by then-Montgomery County D.A. Bruce Castor. My colleague Jenice Armstrong fumed Wednesday that Castor didn't prosecute Cos and seemed to be blaming the victim.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection began Tuesday in the civil trial of a lawsuit brought by a woman in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court against Johnson & Johnson, claiming that a vaginal mesh device made by the company failed after she had it surgically implanted, causing extreme pain and requiring multiple corrective surgeries. Thousands of lawsuits have been filed against J&J - one of the world's biggest makers of health-care products - and other pelvic mesh manufacturers contending that the devices were poorly tested and that the companies failed to disclose information showing the risks.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge has ordered that North Philadelphia demolition contractor Griffin Campbell be questioned under oath by lawyers preparing for next September's civil trial on behalf of those killed and injured in the 2013 Center City building collapse. Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein ruled Monday that a deposition would not infringe on Campbell's Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Campbell, 51, was found guilty in October of six counts of involuntary manslaughter in the June 5, 2013, collapse of a Salvation Army thrift store at 22d and Market Streets.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer for demolition contractor Griffin Campbell said Thursday that he would oppose a move to question Campbell under oath ahead of next year's trial in a suit filed on behalf of the victims in the deadly 2013 collapse of a Salvation Army building in Center City. Lawyers seeking damages for the six killed and 13 injured in the June 5, 2013, disaster at 22d and Market Streets want to depose Campbell under oath for five days in January. Campbell testified in his defense in the criminal trial last month, in which he was found guilty of six counts of involuntary manslaughter and other charges.
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