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Civil War

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LIVING
September 23, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was sometime in the spring - she's not certain of the date - when Helen Steinbacher swung open a long-locked safe in her Chester County home. Widowed since 1966, Steinbacher had lost the key to the safe years before and "had no idea what was in it. " But her son Michael "had been bugging me for years" to find out what was inside, she recalled last week. And so she had called a locksmith. Inside she found a confusing hodgepodge of papers and artwork that had belonged to her husband, Charles, who for 30 years was art director at the George Moll advertising agency in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the 111th Infantry Regiment of the Pennsylvania National Guard had been, along with many other units, on federal service for almost 11 months. It would be four years before the guardsmen would return home. During World War II, this Norristown-based regiment would add to an already-honorable tradition. According to retired Col. William J. Huber, historian of the 111th Infantry Regiment, the unit can trace its lineage to colonial Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 7, 2002 | By Thom Guarnieri INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In June 1917, corn grew on the land that would soon sprout Camp Dix. Three months later, nearly 50,000 young men were there training and living in barracks built so quickly that they had no indoor plumbing. Large stoves were used for heat, and the electricity was carried by two lone wires running down the center of each building. "They were training in the clothes they arrived in," historian Daniel W. Zimmerman, curator of the Fort Dix Museum, told a crowd Tuesday at Barnes & Noble Bookseller at the East Gate Square shopping center.
LIVING
June 7, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnny Reb battles on. At least he does in the South, where reenacting the Civil War is a growing hobby. Tony Horwitz depicts the reenactors - and others who seek to keep the memory of the war alive - humorously, sympathetically and critically in his new book, Confederates in the Attic (Pantheon, $27.50). Horwitz relates how in 1965 he became aware of his 101-year-old great-grandfather's fascination with the Civil War. He muses over why Poppa Isaac, who arrived in the United States from czarist Russia 17 years afer the war ended, made as one of his first purchases in America a book of Civil War sketches.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It is six score and four years since the end of the Civil War, and a strong case can be made that movies have never really done justice to the conflict that proved to be perhaps the most dominant and far-reaching in this country's history. There are, to be sure, such masterworks as D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation (1915) and John Huston's The Red Badge of Courage (1951), and hardy perennials such as Gone With the Wind (1939) and Friendly Persuasion (1956). But the truth is that directors have not taken to the infinite complexities and many subtexts presented by the Civil War. They have left that, for the most part, to the novelists and the historians.
LIVING
December 12, 1999 | By Sally Downey, FOR THE INQUIRER
The detachment from the Stonewall Brigade found their approach north blocked. The Yanks from the 71st Pennsylvania Infantry had already established a stronghold at Somerton United Methodist Church in Northeast Philadelphia. Because of traffic on I-95, the rebels arrived too late for the wedding ceremony of their comrade-in-arms, Mallen Cunningham, to Beth Schneider. Instead, the Confederates got to blow bubbles at men in Union blue, at women in hoop skirts, and at the newlyweds as they left the church.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plaintive, opening notes of the fiddle seemed to entwine themselves around the words of the soldier's last letter to his wife: . . . My very dear Sarah . . . . The moving melody and the reading of Maj. Sullivan Ballou's poignant letter were highlights of last week's Public Broadcasting Service documentary series The Civil War. Almost as soon as The Civil War opened last Sunday night, Florentine Films, which created the series, was deluged...
NEWS
March 1, 1988
No one died this time. The rubber bullets produced no fatalities. No skulls were bashed by billy clubs. There were no horrors of torture during imprisonment. But Monday's skirmish was probably as significant as anything that has happened in South Africa since the Soweto massacre. It even may have been the day the war finally began. Scores of clergymen, wearing their robes and carrying Bibles, linked arms for a march from St. George's Cathedral to deliver a petition to the South African Parliament.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Civil War Reunion, with battle reenactments, period music and children's activities, is scheduled for this weekend at Pennypacker Mills in Schwenksville. The annual event, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow and Sunday, also will include guest speakers, a fashion show and the sale of reproduced Civil War goods. Hundreds of reenactors are expected. Admission is free. Donations will be accepted. All parking for the event is at Central Perkiomen Valley Park on Plank Road, off Route 73 and Route 29. Free parking and shuttle bus service will be provided.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Edward Engel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It was enough to test the mettle of any new foot soldier, but Pvt. Pete Duong was up to the task. Burdened with a 30-pound knapsack, nine-pound Enfield musket and haversack and canteen, Duong patiently waited for Cpl. Mark Hintzen's orders. "Right shoulder arms!" barked Hintzen. Duong stood at attention. "Right shoulder shift!" The private laid the gun flat on his shoulder, the four-foot barrel pointing nearly straight up. "Support arms!" came the final command, and Duong deftly shifted the gun once more, now to the crook of his left arm, with the hammer resting on his forearm.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 7, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Most books in the State Library of Pennsylvania sit available on the shelves when they have not been borrowed by a reader. But other volumes - a book from 1493, prints from the shop of Benjamin Franklin, the debut of Spider-Man - are locked in vaults, where they are kept in the dark at around 45 degrees Fahrenheit, accessible to only a few people who have a fingerprint programmed to open the doors. They are part of the rare collections library, a set of about 20,000 items that merit special protection.
NEWS
September 5, 2016
As Philadelphians honor the contributions and achievements of the American worker on Labor Day, consider the story of the International Typographical Union, one of the oldest such organizations in the country. Many early settlers counted the new world's lack of the printed word as a benefit. "I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing. . . . God keep us from both," professed William Berkeley, a colonial governor, in 1671. For these logophobes, Philadelphia was no respite.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A Chester County school district's controversial plan to tear down a Civil War-era barn on land it recently acquired has been put on hold, as administrators consider possible uses for the two-story structure. The Phoenixville Area School District had applied for a demolition permit because the barn needs repairs to its foundation, among other fixes, and officials were concerned it could be a liability. This week, however, the district's insurance provider confirmed that the building is covered by liability insurance.
NEWS
August 22, 2016
'Today has been a memorable day and I thank God I have been spared to see it. The day was religiously observed, all the churches were open. We had quite a jubilee in the evening. " And so began the 1863 diary of Emilie Davis, a young free black woman living in Philadelphia, as she recounted the Emancipation Proclamation. Davis' three pocket diaries - each no larger than a smartphone - span the years 1863, 1864, and 1865. Purchased by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in 1999, the diaries provide a remarkable glimpse of Philadelphia's free black community during the Civil War. "Few diaries by young women of this period survive, even fewer from African American women," said Tamara Gaskell, public historian in residence at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities.
NEWS
May 31, 2016
By Ron Grossman Just as we have on previous Memorial Days, my wife and I will play "Taps" Monday in a small-town cemetery. Our habit began after we read an editorial about Americans losing sight of the holiday's meaning, thinking of it as the seasonal start of trips to picnic grounds and summer cottages. That idea wasn't new, but it was accompanied by a story about the dwindling ranks of buglers. Now, there was a problem with which we could help out. We play the harmonica, which can mimic a bugle's mournful sound.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Edward Colimore, For The Inquirer
The tree was a living link to more than 160 years of Philadelphia history, and a favorite spot for tourists and history buffs. Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison, and Rutherford B. Hayes - all Civil War generals and U.S. presidents - once sheltered beneath its branches at Laurel Hill Cemetery in the city's East Falls section. Legendary Union Gens. Philip Sheridan, William Tecumseh Sherman, Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, and Dan Sickles were there, too, on the same gentle slope overlooking the Schuylkill.
NEWS
May 11, 2016
It typically takes less than three hours to travel the 140 miles between Philadelphia and Gettysburg. But it took years to reach the conclusion that artifacts in the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia's collection should be moved to the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center. The collection hasn't had a permanent home since 2008, when a mansion at 18th and Pine Streets that served as the museum closed. The plan then was to build a more fitting facility to serve as a museum, but it never happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
At the press event a few weeks ago heralding Civil War , Marvel Studios exec Kevin Feige talked Black Panther. "(Directors) Joe and Anthony Russo and our screenwriters thought it would be very valuable to have somebody that was (new) and wasn't quite as invested (in the conflict)," Feige said. "We wanted somebody who, perhaps, was invested, but didn't have allegiance to any one side-who was essentially in it for very personal reasons, himself. "We knew we wanted to make a 'Black Panther' movie at some point, but at that time we weren't exactly sure when it would be," Feige continued.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
Allen C. Guelzo is a professor of history at Gettysburg College They had just glued the world back together, and within a year it was threatening to come apart again. That might sound like a description of the Arab Spring, or even the fall of the Soviet Union. In fact, it's what happened 150 years ago in the United States. The Civil War had been brought to a close, slavery abolished, and the American Union restored. Sort of. The problem was that the postwar Reconstruction that followed the collapse of the Confederacy and the death of Abraham Lincoln turned out to be a good deal harder to manage, or even imagine, than anyone had dreamt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
LOS ANGELES - Paul Bettany has had an impressive career, with Academy Award-worthy fare like A Beautiful Mind on his resumé - yet he says he might be most impressed by the achievement of his latest film, Captain America: Civil War . "You watch these and you see that they're incredibly difficult films to make," said Bettany, who plays The Vision. "I have directed a movie and I wouldn't have the first clue how to go about making a movie with this many moving parts. The Russo brothers did a great job. " Bettany's character has grown from the voice of Jarvis in 2008's Iron Man to a full, evolving character in last year's Avengers: Age of Ultron , and that was always part of the famous long-range vision of Marvel Studios.
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