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Civil War

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LIVING
September 23, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was sometime in the spring - she's not certain of the date - when Helen Steinbacher swung open a long-locked safe in her Chester County home. Widowed since 1966, Steinbacher had lost the key to the safe years before and "had no idea what was in it. " But her son Michael "had been bugging me for years" to find out what was inside, she recalled last week. And so she had called a locksmith. Inside she found a confusing hodgepodge of papers and artwork that had belonged to her husband, Charles, who for 30 years was art director at the George Moll advertising agency in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the 111th Infantry Regiment of the Pennsylvania National Guard had been, along with many other units, on federal service for almost 11 months. It would be four years before the guardsmen would return home. During World War II, this Norristown-based regiment would add to an already-honorable tradition. According to retired Col. William J. Huber, historian of the 111th Infantry Regiment, the unit can trace its lineage to colonial Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 7, 2002 | By Thom Guarnieri INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In June 1917, corn grew on the land that would soon sprout Camp Dix. Three months later, nearly 50,000 young men were there training and living in barracks built so quickly that they had no indoor plumbing. Large stoves were used for heat, and the electricity was carried by two lone wires running down the center of each building. "They were training in the clothes they arrived in," historian Daniel W. Zimmerman, curator of the Fort Dix Museum, told a crowd Tuesday at Barnes & Noble Bookseller at the East Gate Square shopping center.
LIVING
June 7, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnny Reb battles on. At least he does in the South, where reenacting the Civil War is a growing hobby. Tony Horwitz depicts the reenactors - and others who seek to keep the memory of the war alive - humorously, sympathetically and critically in his new book, Confederates in the Attic (Pantheon, $27.50). Horwitz relates how in 1965 he became aware of his 101-year-old great-grandfather's fascination with the Civil War. He muses over why Poppa Isaac, who arrived in the United States from czarist Russia 17 years afer the war ended, made as one of his first purchases in America a book of Civil War sketches.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It is six score and four years since the end of the Civil War, and a strong case can be made that movies have never really done justice to the conflict that proved to be perhaps the most dominant and far-reaching in this country's history. There are, to be sure, such masterworks as D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation (1915) and John Huston's The Red Badge of Courage (1951), and hardy perennials such as Gone With the Wind (1939) and Friendly Persuasion (1956). But the truth is that directors have not taken to the infinite complexities and many subtexts presented by the Civil War. They have left that, for the most part, to the novelists and the historians.
LIVING
December 12, 1999 | By Sally Downey, FOR THE INQUIRER
The detachment from the Stonewall Brigade found their approach north blocked. The Yanks from the 71st Pennsylvania Infantry had already established a stronghold at Somerton United Methodist Church in Northeast Philadelphia. Because of traffic on I-95, the rebels arrived too late for the wedding ceremony of their comrade-in-arms, Mallen Cunningham, to Beth Schneider. Instead, the Confederates got to blow bubbles at men in Union blue, at women in hoop skirts, and at the newlyweds as they left the church.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plaintive, opening notes of the fiddle seemed to entwine themselves around the words of the soldier's last letter to his wife: . . . My very dear Sarah . . . . The moving melody and the reading of Maj. Sullivan Ballou's poignant letter were highlights of last week's Public Broadcasting Service documentary series The Civil War. Almost as soon as The Civil War opened last Sunday night, Florentine Films, which created the series, was deluged...
NEWS
March 1, 1988
No one died this time. The rubber bullets produced no fatalities. No skulls were bashed by billy clubs. There were no horrors of torture during imprisonment. But Monday's skirmish was probably as significant as anything that has happened in South Africa since the Soweto massacre. It even may have been the day the war finally began. Scores of clergymen, wearing their robes and carrying Bibles, linked arms for a march from St. George's Cathedral to deliver a petition to the South African Parliament.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Civil War Reunion, with battle reenactments, period music and children's activities, is scheduled for this weekend at Pennypacker Mills in Schwenksville. The annual event, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow and Sunday, also will include guest speakers, a fashion show and the sale of reproduced Civil War goods. Hundreds of reenactors are expected. Admission is free. Donations will be accepted. All parking for the event is at Central Perkiomen Valley Park on Plank Road, off Route 73 and Route 29. Free parking and shuttle bus service will be provided.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Edward Engel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It was enough to test the mettle of any new foot soldier, but Pvt. Pete Duong was up to the task. Burdened with a 30-pound knapsack, nine-pound Enfield musket and haversack and canteen, Duong patiently waited for Cpl. Mark Hintzen's orders. "Right shoulder arms!" barked Hintzen. Duong stood at attention. "Right shoulder shift!" The private laid the gun flat on his shoulder, the four-foot barrel pointing nearly straight up. "Support arms!" came the final command, and Duong deftly shifted the gun once more, now to the crook of his left arm, with the hammer resting on his forearm.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
With "Avengers: Age of Ultron" projected to do at least $200 million domestically - after opening to over $200 million overseas last weekend - it is clear that Marvel Studios remains hotter than ever, years after some movie pundits declared the comic-book movie craze over. "We are under incredibly crushing expectations," Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige said in an exclusive interview. Indeed, it says something that if "Avengers: Age of Ultron" does "only" $500 million domestically and $1.3 billion worldwide, it would be considered something of a disappointment.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
In the late fall of 1863, Pvt. Franklin Hill of Northern Liberties was fighting his way through the Tennessee Valley with the Union Army. Tattered and tested at the age of 20, Franklin had already been through hell and back. He was wearing a dead man's pants. He was eating a pig he bought with a Confederate $20 bill he found in the same dead Rebel's pocket. And he was worried sick over his white star. The white star was the emblem of Franklin's famed regiment - the 29th Pennsylvania Volunteers.
NEWS
February 13, 2015
ISSUE | STATE STORES End booze monopoly The politically motivated, specious support among Harrisburg Democrats for the dinosaur that is the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board should anger and incite everyone ("The great bottleneck," Feb. 9). Indeed, the agency is a "Rube Goldberg bureaucracy" - one that was ripe for corruption, wastefulness, and nepotism almost from its inception. That Gov. Wolf stands by this monster shows that he, too, can be influenced by the dirty politics of Harrisburg.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tillman Valentine didn't know the hard times he'd face when he enlisted in the Army that morning of June 30, 1863. He was a black man in a country at war with itself over slavery and state's rights. Emotions were running high as Confederate forces invaded Pennsylvania, where a great battle - the bloodiest of the Civil War - was about to be fought at Gettysburg. Valentine bade an affectionate goodbye to his pregnant wife, Annie, and their three children in West Chester and headed to Camp William Penn, the first and largest federal training ground for black soldiers, just north of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Civil War ended, the constitutional amendments abolishing slavery and establishing civil and legal humanity of African Americans passed - a new day dawned in 19th-century America. Meet the new day, same as the old day. Reconstruction ended in 1877, blacks were disenfranchised, the Supreme Court gave its imprimatur to segregation in 1896; a half-century passed before civil rights dominated the national stage again. Mostly this story is told as it unfolded in the South. But what of the North?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Here's the quick review of People's Light and Theatre Company's local premiere of Row After Row : Jessica Dickey's imaginative play uses a unique subculture to probe fascinating ideas in what is ultimately a flawed and incomplete attempt. And given the play's 70-minute length, even that sentence probably is too much. Dickey's play hops between two events: Pickett's Charge, the foolhardy Confederate gambit during the Battle of Gettysburg, and that same stratagem staged by Civil War reenactors in the present.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
IT TOOK documentarian Ken Burns more than 11 hours to document the devastation of the Civil War. It took the creators of "The Civil War - The Musical" about a fifth of that time to convey with equal power and intensity, the story of the defining episode in our nation's history. There is much to praise about the production at Hammonton's Eagle Theatre, which runs through Oct. 5, beginning with the surprisingly solid and affecting score, which defies major expectations. Going in, the idea of recounting such a brutal and universally destructive event via contemporary musical formats, including rock and country, seemed frivolous and lightweight at best, trivializing and disrespectful at worst.
SPORTS
September 25, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
THERE ARE some questions that seniors in high school should never have to ask. Questions that are deep, philosophical and largely unanswerable. Queries that can, if you let them, stunt your growth, stifle your ambition or paralyze your progression. However, for Haverford School senior running back and linebacker Phil Poquie, a single question and all its permutations, weigh heavily on his mind, but also spur him toward success. When civil war erupted in his native Liberia, Poquie was just 2 years old. His family fled to the United States, sent for by a grandfather who lived in Staten Island, N.Y., to begin life anew, rich with possibilities.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The worn, leather-bound diaries, each about the size of a smartphone, reveal a voice rarely found in print. In them, Emilie Davis, a young housekeeper and seamstress, chronicles her life as a free black woman in Philadelphia during the Civil War. "To day has bin a memorable day and i thank god i have bin sperd to see it," Davis wrote in an entry dated Jan. 1, 1863, the day the Emancipation Proclamation became official. It is the first sentence in a series that fills three pocket diaries, recounting Davis' life from 1863 to 1865.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Almost a century ago, a pair of clever British writers published a send-up of history-as-memory titled 1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England, Comprising All the Parts You Can Remember , Including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings, and 2 Genuine Dates . Since then, I'm sorry to report, things have gone precipitously downhill. We remember nothing. History is only what we know, or sort of know, perhaps imparted to us in movies, legal tender, and Fat Albert cartoons.
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