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Civil War Museum

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NEWS
April 18, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The financially strapped Civil War Library and Museum on Pine Street, which is seeking to lend an undetermined portion of its vast collection of Union-related artifacts to a proposed Virginia museum, has agreed not to move anything without court approval while a legal challenge to its plans is under way. In a consent agreement signed yesterday by Orphans' Court Judge Anne E. Lazarus, the museum also agreed to allow the State Attorney General's Office...
NEWS
June 25, 2004 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The vast holdings of the newly constituted Civil War and Underground Railroad Museum of Philadelphia will be completely inventoried over the next two years, thanks to a $341,000 grant from the William Penn Foundation. The comprehensive inventory and assessment of the collection's condition, possibly the first time the whole collection has been toted up and analyzed, will provide the basis for decisions regarding maintenance and housing for the museum's 3,000 artifacts, 7,000 photographs, 13,000-volume library, and huge cache of manuscripts, documents and letters.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new Civil War and Underground Railroad museum will be established in Philadelphia, thanks to the resolution of legal action involving the troubled Civil War Library and Museum on Pine Street. At a City Hall news conference yesterday, state Attorney General Mike Fisher and State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) announced that a settlement had been reached in wide-ranging litigation brought by the state to prevent the museum from moving away from the city of its birth. The settlement creates a new, 17-member board of directors and broadens the scope of the museum to include materials related to the Underground Railroad.
NEWS
March 8, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was a hero to the rank-and-file soldiers. He rode to the sound of the guns and was repeatedly wounded in some of the Civil War's most horrific battles. One hundred and forty-five years later, the horse that carried Union Gen. George Gordon Meade through fighting at Gettysburg again found himself in the middle of the fray. That time it was between two Philadelphia Civil War museums, each wanting his head. In the end, both sides won. The preserved head of Old Baldy had been a prized possession of the Grand Army of the Republic Museum and Library in the city's Frankford section, and it was lent more than 30 years ago to the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia on Pine Street.
NEWS
January 2, 2004 | By E. Harris Baum
Tucked away on a tree-lined street in Center City Philadelphia is a museum that, since 1888, has been the repository of historical significance. The Civil War Library and Museum, located at 1805 Pine St., has accumulated over the years 3,000 artifacts, 7,000 photographs, a 13,000-volume library, and a trove of manuscripts, letters and documents. Our region came close to losing some of these treasured and historic items. Recently, an amicable settlement was reached following a lawsuit filed by the State Attorney Gen. Michael Fisher, State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Brendan Kelley had been looking for a house big enough to accommodate the six children he and his wife were planning to have. Kelley, who works full time in finance at Aramark Corp., has been buying and rehabbing houses since 1996, "somewhat as a hobby. " So a Jan. 2, 2004, Inquirer article about plans to relocate the Civil War Library and Museum at 1805 Pine St. caught his eye. He walked there from his Smedley Street rowhouse, paid the $5 admission, and entered the first room.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The homeless Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, steward of what scholars regard as one of the finest collections of Civil War materials anywhere but possessing no place to display them, reached an agreement Monday to transfer ownership of its roughly 3,000 artifacts to the Gettysburg Foundation, the private, nonprofit partner of the National Park Service. At the same time, the National Constitution Center on Independence Mall has agreed to mount a permanent exhibition exploring the constitutional impact of the Civil War, using artifacts drawn from what is now the foundation's Gettysburg collection.
NEWS
September 26, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're stored in crates, bubble wrap, and archival boxes, locked away and awaiting their fate at an undisclosed Philadelphia storage facility. Under the packaging are wool uniforms and glistening swords worn by great generals of the Civil War, men who helped preserve the Union. Next to them are muskets, sidearms, and flags carried into desperate battles that determined the nation's fate. Since the closing of the Civil War Museum on Pine Street more than a year ago, at least 3,000 artifacts have been unseen by the public.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The financially strapped Civil War Library and Museum - known nationally for its exhaustive collection of artifacts, books, manuscripts, documents and photographs - will remain permanently bivouacked in Philadelphia, where it was established well over a century ago. A state capital appropriation of $15 million - backed by Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) and Rep. James Roebuck (D., Phila.), passed by the legislature, and expected to be approved by Gov. Schweiker - will provide funding for a new Civil War facility, care for the museum's collection, and operating money for the immediate future.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with tough economic prospects, exhibition opportunities, receptive funders, and the rise of so-called "heritage tourism," Philadelphia institutions are merging, combining, collaborating and cooperating in ways unheard-of for a city widely perceived as deeply conservative, if not backward, in its organizational thinking. Consider: When the financially troubled Civil War Library and Museum announced last year that it was planning to move some of its collection to Richmond, Va., Pennsylvania's attorney general challenged the move in court.
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NEWS
May 20, 2016
By Page Talbott The recent news about Philadelphia's Civil War Museum transferring its artifacts is one piece of a much larger story. It is important to understand the enormous challenges and strains experienced by many historical and cultural institutions throughout the region. The reality is that many of these organizations are rethinking their futures, others are exploring significant changes in programs, and some are considering mergers or other changes of status. The board of the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia chose to examine its long-held intention to build a new museum in light of this difficult environment and decided on a different path.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The homeless Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, steward of what scholars regard as one of the finest collections of Civil War materials anywhere but possessing no place to display them, reached an agreement Monday to transfer ownership of its roughly 3,000 artifacts to the Gettysburg Foundation, the private, nonprofit partner of the National Park Service. At the same time, the National Constitution Center on Independence Mall has agreed to mount a permanent exhibition exploring the constitutional impact of the Civil War, using artifacts drawn from what is now the foundation's Gettysburg collection.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Robert A. Klinger, 70, of Broomall, a chemist and amateur historian, died Monday, Jan. 18, of respiratory failure at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Born to Blanche and Robert Klinger in Norristown, he graduated from Springfield High School in Delaware County in 1963, and later enrolled in Delaware Valley College in Doylestown. He served in the Navy aboard the Du Pont, a destroyer, during the Vietnam War. After his military service, he enrolled at Widener University. He graduated with honors in chemistry and biology.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Craft, 77, of Devon, a former museum director and educator, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of lung disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. A Civil War history buff, Mr. Craft was drawn to the Civil War Library and Museum in Philadelphia, where he was executive director from 1995 to 1999. He started with the museum in 1983, organizing exhibits and doing research. Later, he helped establish a volunteer board of governors, on which he served. Mr. Craft's first career was in public education.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
By Oliver St. Clair Franklin Despite the oft-repeated references to the intentions of the founders in today's political rhetoric, knowledge of U.S. history is at an all-time low in our country. There are many reasons for this, but there is little question that it is a significant threat to our democracy if we don't know what those founders thought and why, what forces have shaped us since, and the meaning of the critically important events that have occurred during our more than 200 years of history.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he wore that slouch hat and blue frock coat 150 years ago, Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade faced a crucial choice that could affect the outcome of the Civil War: Fight or flee? Across an open field at Gettysburg, the Confederate Army under its legendary commander, Robert E. Lee, was preparing a final all-out attack that would become known as Pickett's Charge. Meade stayed put and won the battle on July 3, 1863 - and now, his wool felt hat, with two bullet holes from earlier fighting at Fredericksburg, Va., and the coat with the major general's shoulder straps are part of an exhibit, "Treasures of the Civil War," at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center.
TRAVEL
July 31, 2011
Where: 1925 Vermont Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Sun. On the Web: www.afroamcivilwar.org . Phone: 202-667-2667.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glen Alan Ruzicka, 61, director of conservation at the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts in Philadelphia, died Sunday, Nov. 21, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital from head injuries sustained in a fall at his home in Kimberton. Over 22 years, first as chief conservator, then as director of conservation at CCAHA, Mr. Ruzicka consulted with hundreds of organizations on conservation treatments and preservation planning. He worked with the Free Library of Philadelphia; the University of Pennsylvania; the libraries at Harvard University; the Academy of Natural Sciences; and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 31, 2010
The Inquirer acted hastily in endorsing the proposal for the existing Family Court Building, on Logan Square ("Court disorder," Saturday). Gov. Rendell stated that the city and state had reached agreement that the building would be used for a hotel and museum. This statement raises many questions: 1) What role does the state have in determining the future use of this city-owned property? 2) How did the city and state determine that this was the most appropriate and most feasible use?
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