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Civil War

ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2015 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* FRONTLINE: MY BROTHER'S BOMBER. 10 tonight, Oct. 6 and Oct. 13, WHYY12. KEN DORNSTEIN'S story reads like a feature film. A man who's spent his career behind the scenes of a TV news magazine decides to leave behind his wife and two young children and sneak into Libya, a country in turmoil, in search of the people who might be responsible for the murder of his older brother, and 269 others, in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103. Starting tonight,...
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | Ellen Gray
*  MASTERS OF SEX . 10 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. The story of sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson reaches one of its most controversial points with the initiation of their surrogacy program. *  THE CIVIL WAR . 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, WHYY12. With the Confederate flag so much in the news, the timing couldn't be better for the 25th anniversary rebroadcast of the Ken Burns classic - restored for high-def. *  EMPIRE: SEASON 1 MARATHON . Noon Monday, FX. Get ready for the Sept.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A retired plumber in Magnolia who is a Civil War buff, his musician/optician brother from Barrington, and a Voorhees video editor have teamed up to make a documentary. And it's a powerful piece of work. The South Jersey premiere of Civil War Prisons - An American Tragedy is set for Civic Hall on the Blackwood campus of Camden County College at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 26. Featuring professional voice actor Scott R. Pollak's polished narration, 300 evocative historical images, and a wistful soundtrack, the 77-minute movie is elegiac and unequivocal.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
With "Avengers: Age of Ultron" projected to do at least $200 million domestically - after opening to over $200 million overseas last weekend - it is clear that Marvel Studios remains hotter than ever, years after some movie pundits declared the comic-book movie craze over. "We are under incredibly crushing expectations," Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige said in an exclusive interview. Indeed, it says something that if "Avengers: Age of Ultron" does "only" $500 million domestically and $1.3 billion worldwide, it would be considered something of a disappointment.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
In the late fall of 1863, Pvt. Franklin Hill of Northern Liberties was fighting his way through the Tennessee Valley with the Union Army. Tattered and tested at the age of 20, Franklin had already been through hell and back. He was wearing a dead man's pants. He was eating a pig he bought with a Confederate $20 bill he found in the same dead Rebel's pocket. And he was worried sick over his white star. The white star was the emblem of Franklin's famed regiment - the 29th Pennsylvania Volunteers.
NEWS
February 13, 2015
ISSUE | STATE STORES End booze monopoly The politically motivated, specious support among Harrisburg Democrats for the dinosaur that is the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board should anger and incite everyone ("The great bottleneck," Feb. 9). Indeed, the agency is a "Rube Goldberg bureaucracy" - one that was ripe for corruption, wastefulness, and nepotism almost from its inception. That Gov. Wolf stands by this monster shows that he, too, can be influenced by the dirty politics of Harrisburg.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tillman Valentine didn't know the hard times he'd face when he enlisted in the Army that morning of June 30, 1863. He was a black man in a country at war with itself over slavery and state's rights. Emotions were running high as Confederate forces invaded Pennsylvania, where a great battle - the bloodiest of the Civil War - was about to be fought at Gettysburg. Valentine bade an affectionate goodbye to his pregnant wife, Annie, and their three children in West Chester and headed to Camp William Penn, the first and largest federal training ground for black soldiers, just north of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Civil War ended, the constitutional amendments abolishing slavery and establishing civil and legal humanity of African Americans passed - a new day dawned in 19th-century America. Meet the new day, same as the old day. Reconstruction ended in 1877, blacks were disenfranchised, the Supreme Court gave its imprimatur to segregation in 1896; a half-century passed before civil rights dominated the national stage again. Mostly this story is told as it unfolded in the South. But what of the North?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Here's the quick review of People's Light and Theatre Company's local premiere of Row After Row : Jessica Dickey's imaginative play uses a unique subculture to probe fascinating ideas in what is ultimately a flawed and incomplete attempt. And given the play's 70-minute length, even that sentence probably is too much. Dickey's play hops between two events: Pickett's Charge, the foolhardy Confederate gambit during the Battle of Gettysburg, and that same stratagem staged by Civil War reenactors in the present.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
IT TOOK documentarian Ken Burns more than 11 hours to document the devastation of the Civil War. It took the creators of "The Civil War - The Musical" about a fifth of that time to convey with equal power and intensity, the story of the defining episode in our nation's history. There is much to praise about the production at Hammonton's Eagle Theatre, which runs through Oct. 5, beginning with the surprisingly solid and affecting score, which defies major expectations. Going in, the idea of recounting such a brutal and universally destructive event via contemporary musical formats, including rock and country, seemed frivolous and lightweight at best, trivializing and disrespectful at worst.
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