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Civil War

NEWS
May 31, 2013
OKLAHOMA CITY - At least two tornadoes touched down in Oklahoma and another hit Arkansas yesterday as a powerful storm system moved through the middle of the country. At least one injury was reported when a home was hit in rural western Arkansas. The National Weather Service reported two tornadoes on the ground near Perkins and Ripley in north central Oklahoma and another west of Oden, Ark. Arkansas Emergency Management spokesman Tommy Jackson said first responders were having trouble reaching the destroyed home because a number of trees were blocking the road.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Loveday Morris, Washington Post
BEIRUT - The leader of the Lebanese Shiite militant group Hezbollah said Saturday that Syria cannot be allowed to fall into the hands of enemies as he defiantly justified sending his fighters to support President Bashar al-Assad's government. In a televised address, Hassan Nasrallah gave the clearest public acknowledgment to date that his men were fighting alongside Assad's troops and would continue to do so. As Nasrallah spoke, Hezbollah and government forces were escalating an assault on the strategically important Syrian town of Qusair.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Like Mother Nature - where would we all be without DNA? - Gertrude Stein was fond of repetition. As she wrote in her novel The Making of Americans , "Repeating is the whole of living and by repeating comes understanding. " Well, I wonder. Or I did until I watched a good portion of a nearly hour-long film called Fase at the Institute of Contemporary Art. The film, by Belgian Thierry De Mey, focuses on two female dancers as they execute a series of synchronized spins and movements that suggest vigorous calisthenics.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
IT IS AN inconvenient truth that Monday is Memorial Day, a day of picnics, trips to the zoo, the Shore, the mountains - and mattress sales. OK, other kinds of sales, too, not just mattresses. In America, Memorial Day unspools like Mercantile Day. Only a small percentage of Americans attend parades. Even fewer make trips to the cemetery to decorate the graves of those who gave their lives to protect this great and imperfect nation. After the Civil War, Decoration Day was created as a day to lay flowers on the graves of soldiers, Americans all, who died wearing either the Blue or the Gray.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly a century, the Silent Sentinel watched over the graves of Civil War veterans at Mount Moriah Cemetery in Yeadon and Southwest Philadelphia. The bronze figure of a Union soldier clasping the end of a musket stood at rest amid long, neat rows of white marble headstones. Then, as though deserting its post in fall 1970, the statue disappeared. Thieves pulled it from its granite base and tried to sell it to a Camden scrap dealer, who alerted police. Silent Sentinel was recovered, repaired at a Chester foundry, and stored out of public view for more than 40 years, until a secure location could be found and money raised for a granite base.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Sinan Salaheddin, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq's wave of bloodshed sharply escalated Monday with more than a dozen car bombings across the country, part of attacks that killed at least 95 people and brought echoes of past sectarian carnage and fears of a dangerous spillover from Syria's civil war next door. The latest spiral of violence - which has claimed more than 240 lives in the last week - carries the hallmarks of the two sides that brought nearly nonstop chaos to Iraq for years: Sunni insurgents, including al-Qaeda's branch in Iraq, and Shiite militias defending their newfound power after Saddam Hussein's fall.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Zeina Karam and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Hezbollah was pulled more deeply into Syria's civil war as 28 guerrillas from the Lebanese Shiite militant group were killed and dozens wounded while fighting rebels, Syria activists said Monday. The intense battle drove rebels from large parts of the town of Qusair, part of a withering government offensive aimed at securing a strategic land corridor from Damascus to the Mediterranean coast. Hezbollah-affiliated hospitals in Lebanon urged blood donations through mosque loudspeakers and ambulances raced along the Damascus road in a stark indication of the group's increasingly prominent role in Syria.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
Reserving a larger defense role The current guidance from the Defense Department is that the United States will no longer conduct long-term stability operations, despite 50 years of doing so in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Vietnam, and Korea. Presently, we are said to be "pivoting" to the Pacific Rim, needing to maintain a large military presence to defend that area. Given our precarious economy and exploding debt, the nation must find a way to provide an adequate land force at a sustainable cost.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he wore that slouch hat and blue frock coat 150 years ago, Union Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade faced a crucial choice that could affect the outcome of the Civil War: Fight or flee? Across an open field at Gettysburg, the Confederate Army under its legendary commander, Robert E. Lee, was preparing a final all-out attack that would become known as Pickett's Charge. Meade stayed put and won the battle on July 3, 1863 - and now, his wool felt hat, with two bullet holes from earlier fighting at Fredericksburg, Va., and the coat with the major general's shoulder straps are part of an exhibit, "Treasures of the Civil War," at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center.
NEWS
May 15, 2013
Daoma Winston Strasberg, 90, a Washington author who produced almost 70 mystery and romance novels during a writing career that spanned more than four decades, died April 1 at her home in Washington. She had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, said family friend Michael Mosettig. Mrs. Strasberg, who worked under her maiden name, Daoma Winston, wrote some science fiction, but concentrated primarily on historical novels, many of which were set in her native Washington. Her stories were mostly about the lives of ordinary people in historic settings, stories that tended to revolve around households and families, often focusing on a strong woman as the protagonist.
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