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NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the way to his execution, William Johnson was paraded through camp to a large open field where 10,000 Union soldiers waited. This was a warning to them. Desert, as Johnson did, and suffer the same fate. "Saw man ride by in a wagon," Capt. Charles Hall of the Fourth New Jersey Volunteers wrote on Dec. 13, 1861. "Preceeded by his coffin & the 12 men that were detailed to shoot him. " Eight men fired, and when Johnson still showed signs of life, four more opened up. "Heard the Report & then marched round & saw the dead man lying on ground," Hall, of Palmyra, wrote.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Craft, 77, of Devon, a former museum director and educator, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of lung disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. A Civil War history buff, Mr. Craft was drawn to the Civil War Library and Museum in Philadelphia, where he was executive director from 1995 to 1999. He started with the museum in 1983, organizing exhibits and doing research. Later, he helped establish a volunteer board of governors, on which he served. Mr. Craft's first career was in public education.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
On NBC's radically reprogrammed fairy tale, Grimm , the character of Monroe is a walking contradiction: a civilized monster, a predator pursuing a vegan diet. He's the enlightened descendant of a long line of Blutbaden (what used to be called Big Bad Wolves), creatures that for centuries stalked the dark Germanic forests. "I am a new generation," says Silas Weir Mitchell, the actor who plays him, "trying to live a healthy life in the human realm and disavow my rapacious ancestry.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
People need to look past the men's missing limbs, Marine Corps artist Michael Fay said, to see the resilience in their faces. Even if those faces are scarred and misshapen. One portrait shows Sgt. David Adams, a young Marine from Wisconsin, using his remaining arm to hold an X-ray of his broken back. Cpl. Zachary Stinson has lost both legs. The face of Lance Cpl. Kyle Carpenter, who was wounded by a hand grenade, looks like cracked porcelain. Those and dozens more paintings and sketches make up the Joe Bonham Project, created by Fay and showing at Drexel University as part of a new course on how war is portrayed in the media.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
Having survived the Civil War, this country should know better than to treat the latest government shutdown as the political equivalent of the Bible's depiction of Earth's last days. The American political system may be stalled, but it isn't time for a mercy shot to put it out of its misery. Rather, the mess in Washington should motivate people to use the best means they have to push their government out of its funk: going to the polls and voting. There's a caveat to that prescription, however.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
By Oliver St. Clair Franklin Despite the oft-repeated references to the intentions of the founders in today's political rhetoric, knowledge of U.S. history is at an all-time low in our country. There are many reasons for this, but there is little question that it is a significant threat to our democracy if we don't know what those founders thought and why, what forces have shaped us since, and the meaning of the critically important events that have occurred during our more than 200 years of history.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - The commemoration of this year's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and subsequent events includes amenities that soldiers would have relished 150 years ago. A groomed path to the top of Little Round Top. Expanded cellphone coverage. Dozens of portable toilets. The National Park Service and a cadre of community organizers were well-prepared for the commemoration of the pivotal battle of the American Civil War that cemented this small Pennsylvania town's place in U.S history.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Day coincides this week with remembrances of the pivotal Civil War battle 150 years ago at Gettysburg. So, here are smartphone applications for studying that battlefield - in person or virtually - and for grilling up a revolutionary red, white, and blue barbecue. Gettysburg Battle App is one of several Neotreks apps for Android and Apple devices that commemorate Civil War conflicts. Others cover the Battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg, for example. The Gettysburg app holds a series of maps and narratives for taking walking tours that explain each day of the battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013
A Civil War Odyssey By Peter Carlson Public Affairs. 299 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Christopher Sullivan Among the tens of thousands of books written about the American Civil War, there are dense histories of campaigns, profiles of leaders, compilations of battlefield photos or soldiers' letters home. Then, once in a while, you run across just a really good yarn. That's what Peter Carlson has written in his nonfiction account of two New York Tribune reporters' unique experiences of the war. They witnessed fighting or its aftermath at Shiloh, Antietam, and other slaughters.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG - Sweat soaking their wool uniforms, the Union and Confederate soldiers met near the stone wall to exchange handshakes, pleasantries, even a few jokes. On this warm, sticky Sunday afternoon, North and South both went home happy after the Battle of Gettysburg. Thousands of Civil War buffs re-created the Confederate army's ill-fated Pickett's Charge to end the first of two massive reenactments held to mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's pivotal conflict. But the events to remember the battle that took place July 1-3, 1863, are far from over.
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