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NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG - Sweat soaking their wool uniforms, the Union and Confederate soldiers met near the stone wall to exchange handshakes, pleasantries, even a few jokes. On this warm, sticky Sunday afternoon, North and South both went home happy after the Battle of Gettysburg. Thousands of Civil War buffs re-created the Confederate army's ill-fated Pickett's Charge to end the first of two massive reenactments held to mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's pivotal conflict. But the events to remember the battle that took place July 1-3, 1863, are far from over.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By William C. Kashatus
On this 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, our nation celebrates the courage, valor, and personal honor of the soldiers who fought and died there from July 1 to 3, 1863. An estimated 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War, either in battle or from disease. Union losses totaled 360,222; Confederates, 258,000. And Gettysburg was the costliest battle of all, with a three-day total of 51,112 casualties on both sides. Of all the fallen heroes of the epic battle, Union soldier Amos Humiston was unique.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does it take to be a Civil War reenactor? Here's a view from Don Ernsberger, a Lansdale author of several Civil War books and one of about 8,000 reenactors at a re-creation of the Battle of Gettysburg on Sunday. A larger reenactment by up to 15,000 reenactors will be from Thursday to next Sunday on Table Rock Road. How does someone become a reenactor? Most people who become reenactors have had an interest in Civil War history, and generally, they will attend a reenactment, meet a group of reenactors, become acquainted with them, and come to a meeting.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Bruce E. Mowday
Working men from Philadelphia mustered behind a low stone wall and a copse of trees at Gettysburg 150 years ago to meet their Southern foes in the decisive engagement of the decisive battle of the American Civil War. In civilian life the men were firefighters, clerks, printers, painters, employees of the Federal Mint, and members of many other professions. As soldiers, they joined four Pennsylvania regiments designated as the Philadelphia Brigade to fight for their country. As fate dictated during that hot, humid afternoon of July 3, 1863, the Philadelphia men held the key Union defensive position during the engagement known as Pickett's Charge.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixth in an occasional series on the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1 to 3. A thick, misty fog embraced the blue columns of African American soldiers "like a mantle of death" as they marched through pre-dawn darkness toward the enemy earthworks outside Richmond, Va. Spotted by Confederate pickets, members of the Sixth U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) quickly ran into a torrent of musket and artillery fire that cut through their ranks and shredded the national and regimental colors, snapping the flagpoles in two. That chaotic moment - when Sgt. Maj. Thomas R. Hawkins, First Sgt. Alexander Kelly, and Lt. Nathan Edgerton rushed in to rescue the colors - has been captured for the Union League of Philadelphia in a newly commissioned oil painting by the renowned Civil War artist Don Troiani.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Ayman Suleiman did not come from a medical family. His father was a truck driver, his mother a housewife. But as a young man in Syria, he was influenced by a close friend's physician brother who told him, "You are a better person if you are helping sick people and your family and your neighborhood. " Suleiman took the words to heart and became an ophthalmologist. Little did he dream that decades later, he would be practicing in the United States, driven here by a fellow eye specialist, British-trained Syrian president Bashar al-Assad.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Nicole Mulvaney, THE TIMES OF TRENTON
From swords and muskets to skinning knives and dream catchers, Hamilton's Civil War and Native American Museum combines centuries-old war memorabilia and indigenous artifacts under one small roof, representing a wide range of history. "If these articles could talk, if you could see the person that used them and hunted with them and brought food back for their families, this room would be full of stories," said Clyde Quin, who manages the museum's Native American collection. The museum, which opened in 1996, is housed in the John Abbott House, a two-story, seven-room tenant house on Kuser Road in Veterans Park built in 1730.
TRAVEL
June 2, 2013 | By Roberta Sandler, For The Inquirer
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. - This year, Fredericksburg celebrates its 285th birthday. If this milestone isn't enough reason to soak up the city's well-preserved colonial charm and to stroll along 18th-century streets where brass plaques identify homes' original owners, consider this: You can follow George Washington's footsteps all over Fredericksburg. The future U.S. president grew up in Fredericksburg, but even after he moved to Mount Vernon, he often returned here. His mother Mary, brother Charles, and sister Betty lived here, as did future Continental Army Gen. Hugh Mercer, George's trusted friend, who was Mary's physician and druggist.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
OKLAHOMA CITY - At least two tornadoes touched down in Oklahoma and another hit Arkansas yesterday as a powerful storm system moved through the middle of the country. At least one injury was reported when a home was hit in rural western Arkansas. The National Weather Service reported two tornadoes on the ground near Perkins and Ripley in north central Oklahoma and another west of Oden, Ark. Arkansas Emergency Management spokesman Tommy Jackson said first responders were having trouble reaching the destroyed home because a number of trees were blocking the road.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Loveday Morris, Washington Post
BEIRUT - The leader of the Lebanese Shiite militant group Hezbollah said Saturday that Syria cannot be allowed to fall into the hands of enemies as he defiantly justified sending his fighters to support President Bashar al-Assad's government. In a televised address, Hassan Nasrallah gave the clearest public acknowledgment to date that his men were fighting alongside Assad's troops and would continue to do so. As Nasrallah spoke, Hezbollah and government forces were escalating an assault on the strategically important Syrian town of Qusair.
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