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NEWS
May 28, 2014 | BY DOYLE McMANUS
SEN. MITCH McConnell's easy victory over his tea-party opponent in Kentucky's Republican primary presents a tidy story line: The establishment strikes back. In the primary season so far, McConnell and fellow GOP incumbents have successfully out-organized and outspent such challengers from their right. And yet, even as they rack up wins, they are revealing how the tea party already won the battle for influence in the Republican Party. The GOP's civil war now looks more like a merger: The establishment has moved right, and many of the tea party's voters are rejoining/reconciling with that new mainstream - even if some of their self-appointed leaders are not. Things looked vastly different when these Senate campaigns began and tea-party groups, such as FreedomWorks and the Senate Conservatives Fund, audaciously announced their plan to unseat McConnell, the Senate Republican leader.
TRAVEL
May 25, 2014 | By Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
ANDERSONVILLE, Ga. - While doing honor to nearly 13,000 fellow soldiers, a Connecticut man became one of the biggest whistle-blowers of his era. For his efforts he was hounded by the Army, court-martialed, and sentenced to hard labor for allegedly stealing a government document. His crime sounds as if it could be ripped from today's headlines, but it actually occurred at the close of the Civil War in 1865. The whistle-blower was Dorence Atwater, a Union soldier who had been captured at age 19 and sent to the infamous prisoner-of-war camp near Andersonville.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Silent Sentry has returned to duty, just in time for Memorial Day. After a strange 121-year odyssey that took it from a Yeadon/Southwest Philadelphia cemetery to a Camden scrapyard and Chester foundry, the 700-pound bronze statue of a Union soldier is again standing tall over the graves of Civil War veterans. It will be rededicated at noon on Sunday at Laurel Hill Cemetery in East Falls. The unveiling will be part of ceremonies marking Memorial Day, an observance with Civil War origins that was first officially held in Philadelphia at Laurel Hill on May 30, 1868.
NEWS
May 15, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
JUCONTEE THOMAS Woewiyu, a Liberian native and Delaware County man, is an alleged war criminal who played a key role in a military organization that tortured perceived enemies, killed peacekeepers and raped girls in his home country, according to the U.S. government. And he was a former member of ex-Liberian President Charles Taylor's government. The U.S. Attorney's Office yesterday announced the unsealing of an indictment against Woewiyu, 68, of Collingdale. It alleges that he lied on his 2006 application to become a naturalized U.S. citizen and in a 2009 interview with an immigration officer.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOORESTOWN For weeks, the students of Moorestown High School had read about the American Civil War in books. They completed homework assignments and took quizzes. But on Friday, the war came to them in a more personal way - through the uniforms, swords, letters, images, and diaries of Moorestown residents who actually fought it. The Historical Society of Moorestown brought its entire exhibit on "Moorestown During the Civil War" from its headquarters at the Smith-Cadbury Mansion to the school.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
You wouldn't think there's much love or sex in a graveyard, but it turns out that Laurel Hill Cemetery has plenty of both. Like the Philadelphia banker's son who married one of America's most beautiful actresses. She dumped him. And the devoted wife who had her heart - her real heart, not a paper cutout - buried next to her first husband. And the Union general who sent the Civil War equivalent of nude selfies to a lover who, after being spurned, published his private yearnings in a book.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY NOELLE CARTER, McClatchy News Service
    LOS ANGELES - "There's a rhythm to it, the way she works the masa," Cynthia Gonzalez said quietly. Her mother, Dora, carefully stirred a large pot of masa for tamales over the stove. It was as smooth as custard and lightly fragrant as it began to bubble. Salvadoran tamales are Dora's specialty. They are also tradition. Along with other family specialties, the tamales have been passed down from mother to daughter for generations until now. Cynthia, Dora's only daughter, never had any interest in cooking.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the way to his execution, William Johnson was paraded through camp to a large open field where 10,000 Union soldiers waited. This was a warning to them. Desert, as Johnson did, and suffer the same fate. "Saw man ride by in a wagon," Capt. Charles Hall of the Fourth New Jersey Volunteers wrote on Dec. 13, 1861. "Preceeded by his coffin & the 12 men that were detailed to shoot him. " Eight men fired, and when Johnson still showed signs of life, four more opened up. "Heard the Report & then marched round & saw the dead man lying on ground," Hall, of Palmyra, wrote.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Craft, 77, of Devon, a former museum director and educator, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of lung disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. A Civil War history buff, Mr. Craft was drawn to the Civil War Library and Museum in Philadelphia, where he was executive director from 1995 to 1999. He started with the museum in 1983, organizing exhibits and doing research. Later, he helped establish a volunteer board of governors, on which he served. Mr. Craft's first career was in public education.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
On NBC's radically reprogrammed fairy tale, Grimm , the character of Monroe is a walking contradiction: a civilized monster, a predator pursuing a vegan diet. He's the enlightened descendant of a long line of Blutbaden (what used to be called Big Bad Wolves), creatures that for centuries stalked the dark Germanic forests. "I am a new generation," says Silas Weir Mitchell, the actor who plays him, "trying to live a healthy life in the human realm and disavow my rapacious ancestry.
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