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NEWS
July 19, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Nearly a dozen civilian supervisors in the Police Department's radio room will remain in their jobs while the city appeals a state ruling that uniformed supervisors were unfairly replaced by the civilians last October. The creation of supervisory positions for civilians in the radio room was done at the behest of the blue-collar municipal union, but the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board ruled July 1 that the city should have bargained with the police union even before making the transfers.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rebel soldiers who staged this month's coup attempt against the government of President Corazon C. Aquino received extensive financial and logistical support from civilians, Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos said yesterday. Ramos did not name any of those civilians, but he added that military authorities were investigating the possibility that those loyal to former President Ferdinand E. Marcos, who died in September, had helped underwrite the unsuccessful rebellion, the most dangerous of the six that Aquino has faced.
NEWS
September 11, 2006
I'VE READ the Daily News over the last few months and noticed an abundance of people wanting harsher penalties for anyone who assaults or shoots a cop. I have no problem with that. A police officer is in a position of authority and should be respected. But I must ask: Is a cop's life more important than that of any other citizen of Philadelphia? Where is the outrage when everyday citizens are shot or assaulted? No one asks how the police get the information needed when one of their own is attacked, it's just assumed to be good police work, no matter how they get it. Here's an idea: If a person can get a lengthy amount of jail time for assaulting a cop, why don't cops get a harsher penalty for abusing their power?
NEWS
March 18, 2004 | By Carol Rosenberg INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
As military analysts see it, yesterday's car bombing of a downtown Baghdad hotel is the latest in a surge of attacks on "soft targets" - poorly protected civilians - in the shadowy war to disrupt Iraq's march toward pro-U.S. democracy. Iraqi officials and officials of the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority are bracing for even more carnage around the first anniversary - tomorrow in the United States, Saturday in Iraq - of the start of the war to topple Saddam Hussein. The idea, as some U.S. and Iraqi officials see it, is to wreak enough havoc to scare off the foreigners whose capital and engagement are key to Iraq's opening up to the West after decades of isolation.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Karin Laub, Associated Press
GAZAHIYA, Libya - A 22-year-old student balanced an unloaded grenade launcher on his shoulder, grunted loudly in place of an explosion as he pulled the trigger, then handed the weapon to the next man. The military drill on the lawn of a clinic in a remote village in government-controlled western Libya was part of what Moammar Gadhafi's regime has tried to portray as a large-scale arming and training of the home front. Reporters on a government tour were also taken to a school where two teenage boys fired Kalashnikov rifles in the air. The scenes appeared to have been hastily arranged.
NEWS
November 2, 2008 | By Reuben E. Brigety
In his recent endorsement of Sen. Barack Obama for president, retired Gen. Colin Powell, a former secretary of state and chairman of the military's Joint Chiefs of Staff, offered a view of American foreign policy that has received little notice. "We have to do a lot more with respect to poverty alleviation and helping the needy people of the world," Powell said, "because when you help the poorest in the world, you start to move them up an economic and social ladder, and they're not going to be moving toward violence or terrorism of the kind that we worry about.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | By James A. Michener
It's a bright, sunny day here in Texas. Not a cloud in the sky. I step outside to relish the perfect weather. "They'll be having an exciting time in Cape Canaveral," I tell myself. My phone rings. I hurry inside. My secretary, calling from my office, says with obvious excitement: "Have you been watching television?" "I've been working. " "The space shuttle just blew up in Florida. " Long pause. "On the launch pad?" "Offshore. One minute into flight. " Gasp.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - The U.S.-led coalition on Sunday disputed reports that eight civilians, including children, were killed in a NATO air strike in a remote part of eastern Afghanistan. Afghan officials said an air strike Saturday night killed eight members of a family, but a senior NATO official said that so far, there is no evidence of any civilian casualties. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to disclose the information. Both Afghan President Hamid Karzai and NATO commanders ordered an investigation into the reports, according to the New York Times.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Graciela Galiana stared in horror as a Salvadoran soldier pressed his knife to the throat of a young man whose hands were tied behind his back. The soldier yanked the blade, and the young man crumpled to the ground. "We saw him do this," she said nervously, drawing a finger across her throat. "Then his body fell to the ground. . . . I saw that. I saw it. " The young man was one of nine people who died in Santa Ana's La Union barrio on Nov. 12. Graciela, 26, said leftist guerrillas had escaped the area and the soldiers took revenge on the civilians.
NEWS
March 13, 2006 | By Jeffrey B. Miller
In his March 7 commentary, "Keep state cops policing in labs," former FBI agent Gerald Richards criticized the Rendell administration's plan to put civilians into 68 positions now held by enlisted members of the Pennsylvania State Police. Perhaps Richards doesn't know that the idea of "civilianizing" those jobs did not originate with this administration or the state police. In 1996, the General Assembly's Legislative Budget and Finance Committee reported that nearly 500 state troopers were assigned to jobs that could be performed by civilians.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Jason Nark, and Erin Serpico, STAFF WRITERS
ECHOING SIMILAR Black Lives Matter demonstrations in Atlanta, Washington, and New York, activists in Philadelphia marched Friday night to protest police violence despite Thursday night's deadly sniper attack at a similar protest in Dallas. The first of several demonstrations in the Philadelphia area started small, with a couple dozen people heading south on Broad Street from Erie Avenue toward Center City. They expressed outrage over the deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, La., and Philando Castile near St. Paul., Minn.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
Shira Goodman is executive director of CeasefirePA ( www.ceasefirepa.org ) Phil Goldsmith is a former president and current board member of CeasefirePA Aurora, Sandy Hook, San Bernardino, Orlando. The list is mind-boggling. Different locations, different shooters, different victims. But they share a common feature - a very specific type of gun, a semiautomatic rifle - a lethal weapon that can quickly unleash 75 to 100 rounds of ammunition. Talk about efficiency. These are efficient killing machines.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia police detective charged with kicking a man and breaking his right leg will stand trial on aggravated assault and other charges, a municipal judge ordered Friday. Adam O'Donnell, 43, a nine-year member of the force, sat silently during a preliminary hearing as Judge Teresa Carr Deni ruled. Several fellow detectives were in the courtroom in apparent support of O'Donnell. Theodore Life III, 45, testified during the hearing that O'Donnell kicked him in the right knee, fracturing his femur, on Feb. 3, 2015, outside the Special Victims Unit at 300 E. Hunting Park Ave. In addition to aggravated assault, O'Donnell was charged with kidnapping, unlawful restraint, and official oppression.
NEWS
March 1, 2016
ISSUE | MIDDLE EAST U.S. must help allies Much of the U.S. success in Afghanistan and Iraq has been due in part to the native civilians who served as translators for U.S. military and civilian officials and provided intelligence, knowing they were putting a bull's-eye on their heads. ("U.S. abandons wartime allies," Thursday). If the United States wants to continue to use these allies, we must keep our promises of expeditious visa processing or risk going it alone. The Obama administration, unfortunately, cannot figure out the bigger details of carrying out a plan, such as whether Syrian President Bashar al-Assad should stay or go. How can it be expected to consider smaller details such as refuge for its allies?
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Former U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy took his oath Wednesday as one of the Army's top civilian officials, assuming oversight of the branch's vast business affairs. Murphy, a Democrat who represented Bucks County, was sworn in as undersecretary of the Army, the branch's second-ranking civilian post. He has also taken on the duties of the top job, secretary of the Army, because that job is vacant. He has served as acting secretary since Jan. 7. "We are asking so much of our soldiers and our civilians and their families, and it's so great to be back on the Army team to fight for them," said Murphy, who served as a military lawyer with the 82nd Airborne Division.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia police officers and two civilians were all in stable condition Sunday afternoon in area hospitals after a three-car accident in West Philadelphia. A police vehicle and two civilian vehicles crashed at 55th Street and Haverford Avenue at 12:01 p.m., police said. The police officers, one man and one woman, were transported to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. The civilians were both taken to Lankenau Medical Center, police said.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THERE'S NO chance a story finds a happy ending when a man lies dead on the ground with a bullet in his head. That's the cold, unavoidable truth at the heart of every homicide investigation that unfolds in this city, whether a trigger was pulled by someone settling a drug dispute or by a cop struggling with a suspect. What families of victims strive for instead is justice and truth , words and concepts that have become controversial - and harder to define - whenever someone dies as a result of a police-involved shooting.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia Police Department clerk and her husband were charged Tuesday with stealing department-owned ATVs and falsifying documents to cover up the thefts, the District Attorney's Office has announced. Sharon Hammitt, a clerk in the department's Auto Pound Unit for 26 years, and her husband, John Hammitt, have been charged with theft, forgery and related crimes, prosecutors said on Tuesday. District Attorney Seth Williams said in a statement that Sharon Hammitt - whose job involved keeping records of impounded vehicles - and her husband stole three ATVs from the unit between 2005 and 2010.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Notre Dame University law professor says the legal and moral issues related to the U.S. government's use of unmanned drones to kill individuals in war zones could be more difficult than similar issues on torture. "There is a seductive quality of killing with drones" because they are high-tech and sleek, said Mary Ellen O'Connell. She referred to targeted deaths by drones as "extrajudicial" killings. "International law does not support what the United States and other countries are doing with drones," she said.
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