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Civilians

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NEWS
July 19, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Nearly a dozen civilian supervisors in the Police Department's radio room will remain in their jobs while the city appeals a state ruling that uniformed supervisors were unfairly replaced by the civilians last October. The creation of supervisory positions for civilians in the radio room was done at the behest of the blue-collar municipal union, but the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board ruled July 1 that the city should have bargained with the police union even before making the transfers.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rebel soldiers who staged this month's coup attempt against the government of President Corazon C. Aquino received extensive financial and logistical support from civilians, Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos said yesterday. Ramos did not name any of those civilians, but he added that military authorities were investigating the possibility that those loyal to former President Ferdinand E. Marcos, who died in September, had helped underwrite the unsuccessful rebellion, the most dangerous of the six that Aquino has faced.
NEWS
September 11, 2006
I'VE READ the Daily News over the last few months and noticed an abundance of people wanting harsher penalties for anyone who assaults or shoots a cop. I have no problem with that. A police officer is in a position of authority and should be respected. But I must ask: Is a cop's life more important than that of any other citizen of Philadelphia? Where is the outrage when everyday citizens are shot or assaulted? No one asks how the police get the information needed when one of their own is attacked, it's just assumed to be good police work, no matter how they get it. Here's an idea: If a person can get a lengthy amount of jail time for assaulting a cop, why don't cops get a harsher penalty for abusing their power?
NEWS
March 18, 2004 | By Carol Rosenberg INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
As military analysts see it, yesterday's car bombing of a downtown Baghdad hotel is the latest in a surge of attacks on "soft targets" - poorly protected civilians - in the shadowy war to disrupt Iraq's march toward pro-U.S. democracy. Iraqi officials and officials of the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority are bracing for even more carnage around the first anniversary - tomorrow in the United States, Saturday in Iraq - of the start of the war to topple Saddam Hussein. The idea, as some U.S. and Iraqi officials see it, is to wreak enough havoc to scare off the foreigners whose capital and engagement are key to Iraq's opening up to the West after decades of isolation.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Karin Laub, Associated Press
GAZAHIYA, Libya - A 22-year-old student balanced an unloaded grenade launcher on his shoulder, grunted loudly in place of an explosion as he pulled the trigger, then handed the weapon to the next man. The military drill on the lawn of a clinic in a remote village in government-controlled western Libya was part of what Moammar Gadhafi's regime has tried to portray as a large-scale arming and training of the home front. Reporters on a government tour were also taken to a school where two teenage boys fired Kalashnikov rifles in the air. The scenes appeared to have been hastily arranged.
NEWS
November 2, 2008 | By Reuben E. Brigety
In his recent endorsement of Sen. Barack Obama for president, retired Gen. Colin Powell, a former secretary of state and chairman of the military's Joint Chiefs of Staff, offered a view of American foreign policy that has received little notice. "We have to do a lot more with respect to poverty alleviation and helping the needy people of the world," Powell said, "because when you help the poorest in the world, you start to move them up an economic and social ladder, and they're not going to be moving toward violence or terrorism of the kind that we worry about.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | By James A. Michener
It's a bright, sunny day here in Texas. Not a cloud in the sky. I step outside to relish the perfect weather. "They'll be having an exciting time in Cape Canaveral," I tell myself. My phone rings. I hurry inside. My secretary, calling from my office, says with obvious excitement: "Have you been watching television?" "I've been working. " "The space shuttle just blew up in Florida. " Long pause. "On the launch pad?" "Offshore. One minute into flight. " Gasp.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - The U.S.-led coalition on Sunday disputed reports that eight civilians, including children, were killed in a NATO air strike in a remote part of eastern Afghanistan. Afghan officials said an air strike Saturday night killed eight members of a family, but a senior NATO official said that so far, there is no evidence of any civilian casualties. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to disclose the information. Both Afghan President Hamid Karzai and NATO commanders ordered an investigation into the reports, according to the New York Times.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Graciela Galiana stared in horror as a Salvadoran soldier pressed his knife to the throat of a young man whose hands were tied behind his back. The soldier yanked the blade, and the young man crumpled to the ground. "We saw him do this," she said nervously, drawing a finger across her throat. "Then his body fell to the ground. . . . I saw that. I saw it. " The young man was one of nine people who died in Santa Ana's La Union barrio on Nov. 12. Graciela, 26, said leftist guerrillas had escaped the area and the soldiers took revenge on the civilians.
NEWS
March 13, 2006 | By Jeffrey B. Miller
In his March 7 commentary, "Keep state cops policing in labs," former FBI agent Gerald Richards criticized the Rendell administration's plan to put civilians into 68 positions now held by enlisted members of the Pennsylvania State Police. Perhaps Richards doesn't know that the idea of "civilianizing" those jobs did not originate with this administration or the state police. In 1996, the General Assembly's Legislative Budget and Finance Committee reported that nearly 500 state troopers were assigned to jobs that could be performed by civilians.
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NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Bashar al-Assad's forces gassed the Damascus suburb of Moadamiyeh in August, the fumes penetrated Qusai Zakaria's apartment within minutes. A female neighbor knocked on his door with two unconscious children, but he couldn't breathe or talk. The 29-year-old struggled to the street, where women and children were running about wildly and dropping dead; he saw a young teenager with pale blue eyes on the ground "staring at nothing. " Then his heart stopped, and his body was thrown on a pile of corpses with white foam dripping from their mouths.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the 3,350 furloughed federal civilian employees at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst and 947 others at New Jersey National Guard facilities have returned to work as the government shutdown continues, officials said. The Guard workers came back Tuesday, Joint Base employees Monday. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel rescinded furloughs imposed Oct. 1, saying the employees contributed to military readiness. Nationally, nearly all of the 350,000 who were sent home without pay last week were recalled by the Defense Department.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
HATED DOING it, but it had to be done, and in full view of thousands of my FFFs (Fake Facebook Friends). Late Tuesday night, I posted a remembrance of 9/11 - the thousands of civilian lives lost, plus a thank you to our military, the first responders and the nameless heroes in our intelligence services. You know how they say there's one in every crowd? On Facebook, among the thousands of normal people (more or less) there are the likes of Steve Forman, who posted: "Why did Bush take so long to react to a horrible disaster planned by himself, his brothers, and anyone with him?"
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judge Jack M. Marden, 80, of Souderton, a retired U.S. Army Appellate Court judge who was active in the Souderton community for the last two decades, died Thursday, July 18, at his home of renal failure. He died on his 57th wedding anniversary. Judge Marden, a retired Army colonel, served in the Army Judge Advocate General's Corps for more than 31 years, and for 26 years as a civilian judge. In retirement, he made his mark as chairman of the Souderton zoning board and board member of the Indian Valley Senior Adult Activity Center.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
JERUSALEM - Israeli and Palestinian officials voiced skepticism yesterday that they can move toward a peace deal, as the sides inched toward what may be the first round of significant negotiations in five years. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced late last week that an agreement has been reached that establishes the basis for resuming peace talks. He cautioned that such an agreement still needs to be formalized, suggesting that gaps remain. In his first on-camera comment yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared to lower expectations by saying the talks will be tough and any agreement would have to be ratified by Israelis in a national referendum.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Mirwais Khan and David Rising, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - A roadside bomb struck a motorcycle-drawn cart carrying women and children between two villages Tuesday in western Afghanistan, killing all 17 people on board. The tragedy was a grim reminder of the dangers facing Afghan civilians ahead of the 2014 withdrawal of foreign combat troops. International troops already have pulled back into a largely advisory and training role as they try to prepare Afghan soldiers and police to take over their own security. That effort has been marred by a series of attacks by Afghan troops or insurgents disguised in their uniforms.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
THERE IS AN ICONIC scene from one of my favorite movies, "A Few Good Men," in which an enraged Col. Jack Nicholson cuts down Lt. Tom Cruise with five words: "You can't handle the truth. " On celluloid, that moment was designed to convince us that the military was filled with unforgiving, brutal automatons who demanded absolute obedience from their inferiors. In other words, cheers for Jack were not what the director hoped to elicit. And yet, that moment was about as authentic as they come, a raw and unvarnished glimpse of something that makes many civilians, especially women, cringe: the culture of military command.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Jay Price and Rezwan Natiq, McCLATCHY FOREIGN STAFF
KABUL, Afghanistan - A suicide bomber detonated an explosives-packed car outside a gate at the Afghan Supreme Court during the afternoon rush hour Tuesday, killing 17 people and wounding 38, all of them civilians, Afghan officials said. It was the second consecutive day that insurgents staged a significant suicide attack in the capital, and it raised again the question of whether the Afghan government can ensure security from Taliban attackers. On Monday, a failed Taliban attack on the military side of the Kabul airport killed seven attackers and did little damage.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Ernesto Londoño, Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - An Afghan soldier opened fire on U.S. troops in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday after arguing with one of the Americans, killing two service members and a U.S. civilian, U.S. and Afghan officials said. The confrontation marked the deadliest insider attack in the country this year and added to the death toll from an intense fighting season, which U.S. and Afghan officials are watching closely for indicators of the Taliban's resilience as American troops accelerate their withdrawal.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
A FERN ROCK MAN was arrested early yesterday after he allegedly shot at a group of people on South Street and then fired at police. The shootings happened about 1:45 a.m. near 6th Street, police said. Police gave this account: A man approached three people and began flirting with a woman in the group. When the woman rejected his advances, an argument ensued, at which point the man grabbed the woman, flashed a gun tucked inside his waistband and threatened the group. He walked away, crossed South Street, pulled out the gun and fired once at the group, striking a parked car. As the group ran for cover, officers in the area saw the commotion and ran toward the scene.
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