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Civility

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NEWS
May 8, 2007 | By ANTHONY H. WILLIAMS
RECENTLY, A friend engaged in a rather lively debate concerning Don Imus and the consequences of his stereotyping remarks. My friend wasn't trying to defend Imus' tasteless commentary, but he has constantly been exclaiming, "Foul - there is a double standard. " He claims that African-Americans are allowed to make statements that non-African-Americans are not allowed to, and he then continues to bellow on about rap music. Of course, I responded. "There is no double standard here, and what does rap music have to do with anything?"
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stephen Carter, author of Civility: Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy and a professor of law at Yale University, will be the speaker at a community forum 7 p.m. Sunday at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 625 Montgomery Ave. Carter will speak on "Civility and Morals. " Beth David Reform Congregation, 1130 Vaughans Lane, Gladwyne, will host a scholar-in-residence program the weekend of April 23. Ellen Umansky, professor of Judaica studies at Fairfield University, will speak at evening services April 23 on "Reform Judaism in the 21st Century: Where Are We Heading?"
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
Good evening. I'm Peter Lemmings. Tonight we bring you an exclusive report from the closed-door congressional retreat held last weekend in Hershey, Pa. The retreat was billed as a private chance for bipartisan fellowship, not open to the press or public. But our crackerjack reporter, Barbara Blah-Blah, posed as a Food Lion catering employee to penetrate the secret world of congressional collegiality. What happens when political adversaries spend a weekend playing golf and eating chocolate?
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Chuck Newman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first-time visitor to this pear-shaped paradise in the southeast corner of the Caribbean, the process of getting to Barbados may appear to be a you-can't-get-there-from-here exercise. But once you set foot on this island, after what can amount to nearly a full day of flights, it becomes clear that the arduous journey was worth the effort. It is not for nothing that they call Barbados "the pearl of the Caribbean. " It would, in fact, be difficult to hype the island's assets: endless white-sand beaches, rolling hills and jagged highlands, waving cane fields, quaint fishing villages, all set amid azure waters in a climate that varies little from perfection the year round.
NEWS
November 14, 2006 | By Rep. Nancy Pelosi
The morning after the election, I received a powerful reminder of why so many of us choose public service as our life's work. While walking into my office, I ran into a group of schoolchildren who had come to visit the Capitol. Talking with them reminded me of the solemn responsibility each generation has to the ones that follow. Their enthusiasm and energy spoke more powerfully than any words could that they are inheritors of the future we choose to build today. This year, voters elected Democratic candidates from every region of our country, giving Democrats the majority in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, and entrusting us with a great deal of responsibility for building that future.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
IPRETTY MUCH disagree with almost all of Christine Flowers' beliefs. That said, I found her July 1 column disheartening, not because of the ideas she expressed but because of the emails she says she regularly gets from readers calling her, in her words, a "rhymes-with-witch," "rhymes-with-punt" or "rhymes-with-trucker. " I've had numerous email exchanges with Ms. Flowers. She has always been polite in responding. In one of our first, she thanked me for expressing my views without resorting to name-calling.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
This is an edited excerpt from Michael Smerconish's new book, "Morning Drive: Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Talking," published on Monday by Globe Pequot Press. It's a political manifesto and an inside look at today's split-screen cable TV and talk-radio world. On Saturday, Michael will be at the Jenkintown Barnes & Noble (10 a.m.) and the Exton Barnes & Noble (2 p.m.) for book signings. Visit www.smerconish.com for more on the book and upcoming signings. THE Pennsylvania Society dates from a time when Philadelphia was the center of the universe.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps it could happen only at a time when the public seems to have had its fill of scandal. While music blared from parties at a dormitory next door, students packed into Olin Auditorium at Ursinus College in Collegeville on Friday night to hear local congressional representatives discuss a program titled "Civility and Comity in National Legislative Affairs. " Transmitted live to a cable audience from Harrisburg to Atlantic City, the program sponsored by Suburban Cable drew more than 250 students and local residents.
NEWS
November 8, 2005 | By Larry Kane
The land of the free. The home of the angry. I've just returned from an eight-city tour promoting a book - and let me tell you: A trip like that really can open your eyes to the mood of people across the country. I didn't like what I saw. People are angry. They walk the big cities and the airport terminals tense and unfriendly, eyes unwilling to make contact. Everywhere I went, it was 1968 all over again. That year, for those of you who don't remember, was one of the most hateful in our history, with people taking sides for or against the Vietnam War and the civil rights struggle.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Leonard Pitts
Can we be candid here? The public is a bunch of rude, obnoxious jerks. OK, so I overstate. A little. Yes, there are exceptions. I'm not such a bad guy, and you, of course, are a paragon of civility. But the rest of them? A cavalcade of boors, boobs, bums, bozos, and troglodytes. So it is small wonder the tale of Steven Slater has hit a nerve. Reports say Slater, a flight attendant for JetBlue, got into it with a woman who cursed him when he asked her not to stand up to retrieve her bags while the plane was still taxiing.
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NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former officer filed a civil rights suit Monday in federal court against the Radnor Township Police Department, its chief, and five officers, alleging racial discrimination. Nick Lai of Philadelphia alleges that the discrimination began May 1, 2013, the day he was hired. He has been terminated, according to the court filings. Lai is the brother of Tina Lurie, wife of Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie. Efforts to reach Lai were unsuccessful. He filed the lawsuit himself. Radnor Police Chief William Colarulo said he had no comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
This is what most of us know about Genghis Khan and his Mongolian horsemen: "They killed women, men, children, ripped open the bodies of the pregnant and slaughtered the unborn," in the words of 13th-century Arab chronicler Ali ibn al-Athir. That's about it when comes to "Mongol hordes. " But for Don Lessem of Media, an exhibitor and self-described "dino guy," there's a lot more than infanticide and slaughter to Genghis Khan (ca. 1162-1227), founder of what became the largest land-based empire in history, stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Black Sea. "He built this incredible empire - his character was magnetic," Lessem said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts opened its season Saturday afternoon not in sylvan Fairmount Park but amid the golden glow of Mother Bethel AME Church's stained glass, its audience in the fervent communion of common purpose. Baltimore and social justice were on everyone's lips, even if nothing so specific could have been foreseen when plans for the concert were first laid. It was the kickoff of the Mann's Liberty Unplugged! festival, the music center's months-long focus on Frederick Douglass, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, and so it was. But social justice being the unfinished business it is, by the time these musical performances and poetry readings reached the stage, they had gathered a new, grievous urgency.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
With "Avengers: Age of Ultron" projected to do at least $200 million domestically - after opening to over $200 million overseas last weekend - it is clear that Marvel Studios remains hotter than ever, years after some movie pundits declared the comic-book movie craze over. "We are under incredibly crushing expectations," Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige said in an exclusive interview. Indeed, it says something that if "Avengers: Age of Ultron" does "only" $500 million domestically and $1.3 billion worldwide, it would be considered something of a disappointment.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IN WHAT THEIR attorney called a "significant step" in the healing process of two survivors of child sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has settled the first civil suits filed in 2011 after a damning grand-jury report on sex abuse by area priests. The settlements with survivors - identified in court documents as John Doe 10 and John Doe 187 - were made earlier this year, the second coming in February the day before jury selection was to begin for the trials in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, said attorney Dan Monahan, who represented both men. Monahan and attorney Jeff Anderson announced the settlements yesterday.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most important figures in the civil-rights movement was stopped from speaking at the historic March on Washington and has spent the last half-century in virtual obscurity. But a month before that 1963 march, it was Gloria Richardson, a full-time mother who kept guns in her house, seated next to U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy during the signing of the historic "Treaty of Cambridge. " As the leader of a group that became a national model for the likes of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the burgeoning black power movement, she was instrumental in brokering that agreement, which lay the groundwork for desegregation in an Eastern Shore town in Maryland.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
In the late fall of 1863, Pvt. Franklin Hill of Northern Liberties was fighting his way through the Tennessee Valley with the Union Army. Tattered and tested at the age of 20, Franklin had already been through hell and back. He was wearing a dead man's pants. He was eating a pig he bought with a Confederate $20 bill he found in the same dead Rebel's pocket. And he was worried sick over his white star. The white star was the emblem of Franklin's famed regiment - the 29th Pennsylvania Volunteers.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HATTIE MIMS found an unusual way to disarm a cop. She was demonstrating with Cecil B. Moore to force the integration of Girard College in 1966, and the police were taking some of the more rowdy protesters away. But when an officer came up to Hattie, apparently with every intent of putting her in handcuffs, she said, "I'll pray for you. " The cop went away - his blessing intact. Hattie Mims, a community and political activist and veteran of the civil-rights struggle of the 1960s, died March 11. She was 98 and lived for many years in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years after agreeing to submit to federal court monitoring of its controversial stop-and-frisk program, the Philadelphia Police Department has made little progress toward curbing unwarranted stops that disproportionately target minorities, according to an analysis filed Tuesday by a group of civil rights lawyers. The report found that 37 percent of the more than 200,000 pedestrian stops made by police in 2014 were done without reasonable suspicion of criminal activity - down from 47 percent from in 2012.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER NEARLY a year of legal wrangling, a civil-rights case against two police officers and the city's top cop has been settled for $85,000. A federal judge dismissed the case, filed in March 2014 by Rodney Handy Jr. against Officers Shane Darden and Timothy Taylor and Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey over Handy's arrest in 2012, court records show. The dismissal came after the parties were able to settle their dispute out of court, according to an order filed yesterday. The city settles out of court most civil-rights claims made against police, according to a Daily News review last year of settled police lawsuits . The Daily News found that Philly paid out $14 million to settle civil-rights claims alone in 2013 — nearly four times as much as the $4.2 million just five years earlier.
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