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Civility

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NEWS
May 8, 2007 | By ANTHONY H. WILLIAMS
RECENTLY, A friend engaged in a rather lively debate concerning Don Imus and the consequences of his stereotyping remarks. My friend wasn't trying to defend Imus' tasteless commentary, but he has constantly been exclaiming, "Foul - there is a double standard. " He claims that African-Americans are allowed to make statements that non-African-Americans are not allowed to, and he then continues to bellow on about rap music. Of course, I responded. "There is no double standard here, and what does rap music have to do with anything?"
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stephen Carter, author of Civility: Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy and a professor of law at Yale University, will be the speaker at a community forum 7 p.m. Sunday at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 625 Montgomery Ave. Carter will speak on "Civility and Morals. " Beth David Reform Congregation, 1130 Vaughans Lane, Gladwyne, will host a scholar-in-residence program the weekend of April 23. Ellen Umansky, professor of Judaica studies at Fairfield University, will speak at evening services April 23 on "Reform Judaism in the 21st Century: Where Are We Heading?"
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
Good evening. I'm Peter Lemmings. Tonight we bring you an exclusive report from the closed-door congressional retreat held last weekend in Hershey, Pa. The retreat was billed as a private chance for bipartisan fellowship, not open to the press or public. But our crackerjack reporter, Barbara Blah-Blah, posed as a Food Lion catering employee to penetrate the secret world of congressional collegiality. What happens when political adversaries spend a weekend playing golf and eating chocolate?
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Chuck Newman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first-time visitor to this pear-shaped paradise in the southeast corner of the Caribbean, the process of getting to Barbados may appear to be a you-can't-get-there-from-here exercise. But once you set foot on this island, after what can amount to nearly a full day of flights, it becomes clear that the arduous journey was worth the effort. It is not for nothing that they call Barbados "the pearl of the Caribbean. " It would, in fact, be difficult to hype the island's assets: endless white-sand beaches, rolling hills and jagged highlands, waving cane fields, quaint fishing villages, all set amid azure waters in a climate that varies little from perfection the year round.
NEWS
November 14, 2006 | By Rep. Nancy Pelosi
The morning after the election, I received a powerful reminder of why so many of us choose public service as our life's work. While walking into my office, I ran into a group of schoolchildren who had come to visit the Capitol. Talking with them reminded me of the solemn responsibility each generation has to the ones that follow. Their enthusiasm and energy spoke more powerfully than any words could that they are inheritors of the future we choose to build today. This year, voters elected Democratic candidates from every region of our country, giving Democrats the majority in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, and entrusting us with a great deal of responsibility for building that future.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
IPRETTY MUCH disagree with almost all of Christine Flowers' beliefs. That said, I found her July 1 column disheartening, not because of the ideas she expressed but because of the emails she says she regularly gets from readers calling her, in her words, a "rhymes-with-witch," "rhymes-with-punt" or "rhymes-with-trucker. " I've had numerous email exchanges with Ms. Flowers. She has always been polite in responding. In one of our first, she thanked me for expressing my views without resorting to name-calling.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
This is an edited excerpt from Michael Smerconish's new book, "Morning Drive: Things I Wish I Knew Before I Started Talking," published on Monday by Globe Pequot Press. It's a political manifesto and an inside look at today's split-screen cable TV and talk-radio world. On Saturday, Michael will be at the Jenkintown Barnes & Noble (10 a.m.) and the Exton Barnes & Noble (2 p.m.) for book signings. Visit www.smerconish.com for more on the book and upcoming signings. THE Pennsylvania Society dates from a time when Philadelphia was the center of the universe.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps it could happen only at a time when the public seems to have had its fill of scandal. While music blared from parties at a dormitory next door, students packed into Olin Auditorium at Ursinus College in Collegeville on Friday night to hear local congressional representatives discuss a program titled "Civility and Comity in National Legislative Affairs. " Transmitted live to a cable audience from Harrisburg to Atlantic City, the program sponsored by Suburban Cable drew more than 250 students and local residents.
NEWS
November 8, 2005 | By Larry Kane
The land of the free. The home of the angry. I've just returned from an eight-city tour promoting a book - and let me tell you: A trip like that really can open your eyes to the mood of people across the country. I didn't like what I saw. People are angry. They walk the big cities and the airport terminals tense and unfriendly, eyes unwilling to make contact. Everywhere I went, it was 1968 all over again. That year, for those of you who don't remember, was one of the most hateful in our history, with people taking sides for or against the Vietnam War and the civil rights struggle.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Leonard Pitts
Can we be candid here? The public is a bunch of rude, obnoxious jerks. OK, so I overstate. A little. Yes, there are exceptions. I'm not such a bad guy, and you, of course, are a paragon of civility. But the rest of them? A cavalcade of boors, boobs, bums, bozos, and troglodytes. So it is small wonder the tale of Steven Slater has hit a nerve. Reports say Slater, a flight attendant for JetBlue, got into it with a woman who cursed him when he asked her not to stand up to retrieve her bags while the plane was still taxiing.
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NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITER
James C. Kennedy Sr., 98, a longtime mayor of South Coatesville, who fought discrimination by becoming active in Chester County's civic life, died Thursday, Aug. 11, of an infection at Phoenixville Hospital Hospice. As a young man in 1938, Mr. Kennedy said, he and others stood outside the Coatesville jail one night to prevent the rumored lynching of a black man by a group of whites, allegedly because the man had kissed a white girl. No violence occurred, but the spark of activism kindled that night led Mr. Kennedy, then 21, and his friends to found the NAACP of Coatesville.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Ask any comic-reading child to name his or her favorite superhero, and the answer may range from Spider-Man to Wonder Woman. Someday, such a child might also name civil rights activist and now comic-book protagonist U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D., Ga.). The 76-year-old congressman recently released March: Book Three , the final installment of a graphic novel trilogy about his life working for civil rights. The saga takes us through Lewis' life, from growing up in the 1940s on 110 acres of farmland in Pike County, Ala., to his speech at the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
The Rev. Willie R. James Sr., 95, of Willingboro, a civil rights pioneer who successfully sued a private developer to racially integrate a neighborhood in that town, died Tuesday, Aug. 2, at the Marcella Center nursing home in Burlington Township. Born Sept. 13, 1920, in Vidalia, La., Rev. James attended all-black schools as a child and went on to attend the historically black Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge. In 1941, he was drafted into the Army, where he became an officer in the Criminal Investigation Unit.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Men, women, and children stand outside the downtown Vineland Woolworth's in 1960 to protest the segregated lunch-counter policies of the retail chain's Southern stores. Setting a national precedent, Lawnside establishes an official holiday in memory of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. just five days after the civil rights leader's assassination April 4, 1968. And that August, four Boardwalk blocks away from the home of the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City, Saundra Williams is crowned the first Miss Black America.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Frederick T. Reel, 88, of Gibbstown, who retired in 1988 as a civil engineer at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died Thursday, July 28, at Power Back Rehabilitation in Moorestown from complications from a fall on his property. Born in Woodbury, Mr. Reel was a 1946 graduate of Paulsboro High School and earned a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from what is now Widener University in 1950, a daughter, Sharon, said. He was an officer with an Army engineering combat battalion in Korea in 1950 and 1951 and retired as an Army Reserve colonel.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
The 2017 XT5 isn't exactly a carefree new kid in Mr. Cadillac's Neighborhood. Insouciance is something this brand-new midsize crossover SUV can't afford. It was handed a hefty responsibility: replacing the luxury car maker's best-selling model, the SRX. Fortunately for this all-new automobile (and its manufacturer), this is a civil, sophisticated, and able vehicle that's up to the challenge. That's because it's simply a markedly better car than the SRX. The XT5, which competes with the likes of the Lexus RX, starts at $38,995 in base, front-drive form and goes up to $62,500 for the top-of-the-line, all-wheel-drive Platinum model that I tested.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge has denied a motion by lawyers for real estate speculator Richard Basciano to move the Sept. 6 civil trial in the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse out of Southeastern Pennsylvania because of pretrial publicity. The one-page order, without explanation, was filed Tuesday by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina. She is the newly appointed trial judge for the consolidated lawsuits resulting from the June 13, 2013, collapse of an unsupported and partly demolished wall.
NEWS
July 26, 2016
Civil rights icon John Lewis , who's been representing Georgia's 5th congressional district for nearly 30 years, will take part in a pre-release signing of March: Book Three , the latest edition in the award-winning autobiographical graphic novel series by Lewis and his co-writer Andrew Aydin . The event will take place at Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse (2578 Frankford Ave.), on Wednesday, July 27 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm. "We're excited to have Congressman Lewis coming to visit," Amalgam founder Ariell Johnson told Tattle Comics Guy Jerome Maida . "We were contacted by the March publishers at Top Shelf Productions after we were getting press in the fall as an independently focused comic book shop owned by an African-American woman.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Bruce Caswell
AS THE NATION watches the Democratic National Convention this week, we should recall the history made the last time the Democrats met in Philadelphia. In July 1948, a group of liberal activists engineered the adoption of the Democrats' first strong civil-rights plank. This was an important milestone in the long and ongoing struggle for civil rights and, in many respects, the beginning of the modern Democratic Party. After World War II, civil rights emerged as an important national issue.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who presided over the landmark 2012 Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial has been assigned to handle what is expected to be the biggest civil trial in years - the Sept. 6 trial of lawsuits from the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse. Court records show Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina was assigned Thursday to preside over what is expected to be a four-week jury trial of suits against real estate speculator Richard Basciano, several of his companies, the Salvation Army, and others on behalf of six people killed and 13 injured June 5, 2013.
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