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Clam Chowder

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NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whatever its other attributes, Doc's Place in Cherry Hill is one of the most unpretentious restaurants you are likely to find. This newest branch of a shore-based chain opened in March at the back of Kress' Liquor Store, replacing the short-lived Kress' Cafe Two. This new venture has branches in Somers Point, Ocean City, Ventnor and Atlantic City, so you have plenty of opportunities to see for yourself. The Cherry Hill outlet personifies the term "modest. " Indeed, everything about the place - from its dark, somewhat claustrophobic setting to its limited menu of ordinary Southern Italian cuisine and commercially made appetizers - exults in modesty.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
50 littleneck clams, picked over, discard any with broken shells 2 cups water Bottled clam juice (optional) 1 ounce meaty salt pork, rind removed and cut into ?-inch dice 1 tablespoon butter (optional) 1 clove garlic 1 medium yellow onion, diced small 1 stalk of celery, diced small 1 sprig fresh thyme 1 dried bay leaf 4 or 5 potatoes, peeled and cut into ?-inch dice Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 cup cup heavy cream 1. Scrub clams and rinse well.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " A few years working in New England gave me a taste of some of the best "chowda" I had ever eaten, both at little corner restaurants, seafood shacks on the Cape, and of course, at the famed Legal Sea Foods in Boston. Everyone had their own version, but the best were smooth and rich soups, stocked with clams, potatoes, a little onion, and a healthy splash of cream. Back in the Philadelphia area, I found it hard to find the same soup, as most restaurant renditions were dense and gloppy, thickened with flour and resonating with a strong flavor of bacon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Harpo, a large blue macaw that plays the colorful winged doorman at the Islander Restaurant in Longport, N.J., doesn't speak much, but the bird's presence sets the pace for the tropical theme. The Islander, in its second season, is at the Seaview Harbor marina on the causeway connecting Longport with Somers Point in Atlantic County. A deck with tables wraps around the indoor dining room, and just about every table has an ocean view. The restaurant is washed in soothing greens punctuated with sun-bleached white.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Florence landmark, Bung's Bar & Grill, that was forced to relocate to make way for a highway interchange has won an extra $44,000 from a jury this week to help pay for the tavern's replacement. The owners, John Hiros and his two sons, had sought $410,000 for the property on Route 130, including interest and other costs, but a panel appointed by the court offered $200,000. After a four-day civil trial before Superior Court Judge John A. Sweeney, a jury determined that the property was worth $244,000.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2005 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two banks whose business is about evenly divided between Philadelphia and Boston are making intramural bets over tomorrow's Super Bowl. "We can't lose," Sovereign Bancorp managing director Dick Ehst said. At Sovereign, the rematch is personal. In September 2003, when the Patriots beat the Eagles, Jim Lynch, head of Sovereign's Philadelphia-based Mid-Atlantic division, had to wash the SUV of John Hamill, then the head of Sovereign's New England arm. "I don't think Mr. Lynch put his best effort into it," bank spokesman Carl Brown said yesterday.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | By Lisa Suhay, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jane Kunze thought she had found the silver lining to the weekend's storm as she strolled down the beach yesterday, ankle deep in her favorite food. "I've never seen so many clams in all my life," said Kunze of Englewood, N.J., with visions of hot clam chowder dancing in her head. "There are enough clams here to feed the whole island. " But little did Kunze know that in gathering some of the hundreds of thousands of clams that the storm had coughed up on Long Beach Island, she was risking her health and breaking the law. It's illegal to clam without a license in New Jersey, and local clam experts warned yesterday that the washed-up clams might be tainted with bacteria.
FOOD
April 22, 2016
Philadelphia Montessori / Fernhill After a day of taking standardized tests, the kids were spent, and there was a lot of dicing to be done. The kids learned another French cooking term - roux - as we slowly whisked flour into melted butter. "It's getting thick," said Aniyiah Winchester. "It's like gravy," Sahad Horton added. They appreciated the results. "Delicious!" "Chewy!" "Rich!" "Can I have seconds?" And then there was calm. - Fran Melamed, Rachel Josloff Russell Byers, Gen. George A. McCall Before making the corn bread, we compared fresh, local cornmeal and a supermarket brand.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Food-wise, it's easy to go overboard at the Starboard Inn, for this pleasant Surf City restaurant has one of the largest buffet tables of any place at the Jersey Shore. Now in its 20th year, the Starboard has grown from a tiny, hard-to-find spot to one of Long Beach Island's premier restaurants. The menu is heavy with seafood and pasta dishes, but the best buy is the dinner buffet, which fairly groans with at least two dozen main courses, most of fairly high quality. The $16.95 price also includes what owner Jim Malloy calls "the largest salad barge on Long Beach Island" as well as a huge bucket, literally, of the best New England clam chowder south of Boston.
NEWS
September 5, 2002 | By Dean P. Johnson
My 10-year-old son has received an invitation to a birthday party at a popular pizza restaurant for the evening of Sept. 11, and I'm not sure whether this is evidence of poor judgment or sheer brilliance. As Sept. 11 nears, many of us grow just a little more unsettled, not so much from any concern of a reoccurrence of terroristic activities but from trepidation that we may not do the right thing in observance of the occasion. It's so important to do the right thing, too. Even though no one may ever notice you doing the right thing, rest assured you will be caught doing the wrong thing every time.
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FOOD
April 22, 2016
Philadelphia Montessori / Fernhill After a day of taking standardized tests, the kids were spent, and there was a lot of dicing to be done. The kids learned another French cooking term - roux - as we slowly whisked flour into melted butter. "It's getting thick," said Aniyiah Winchester. "It's like gravy," Sahad Horton added. They appreciated the results. "Delicious!" "Chewy!" "Rich!" "Can I have seconds?" And then there was calm. - Fran Melamed, Rachel Josloff Russell Byers, Gen. George A. McCall Before making the corn bread, we compared fresh, local cornmeal and a supermarket brand.
FOOD
April 22, 2016
Makes 6-8 servings 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 4 stalks of celery, medium dice 6 carrots, medium dice 4 medium potatoes, medium dice 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper 4 6 ounce cans minced clams in their juice 1 8-ounce bottle clam juice 1/4 cup flour 3 tablespoons butter 2 cups whole milk 1. Heat olive oil in...
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " A few years working in New England gave me a taste of some of the best "chowda" I had ever eaten, both at little corner restaurants, seafood shacks on the Cape, and of course, at the famed Legal Sea Foods in Boston. Everyone had their own version, but the best were smooth and rich soups, stocked with clams, potatoes, a little onion, and a healthy splash of cream. Back in the Philadelphia area, I found it hard to find the same soup, as most restaurant renditions were dense and gloppy, thickened with flour and resonating with a strong flavor of bacon.
NEWS
August 26, 2007
On quiet Howard Street, just off the intersection of Broad and Main in Riverton, sits Tony's Seafood Cafe. We visited the place at the recommendation of a reader, Amber Bibelheimer of Merchantville, who wrote: "Wow! describes the food. " Bibelheimer said the place wasn't fancy. It has wood tables and chairs, whirring ceiling fans, and framed photographs of what look like local sites on the walls. With paper placemats and napkins, it has a mariner's feel in an old Victorian setting.
REAL_ESTATE
November 20, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Dean Johnson, host of the renovation TV program Hometime, crouched in the corner of a kitchen, showing John Channon how to install 12-by-12-inch ceramic tiles along blue chalk guidelines he carefully snapped along the fiber-cement underlayment known as Hardiboard. Before applying the adhesive, Johnson and Channon placed several tiles side by side on the floor along the chalk line, both to see how they would fit and to determine the spacing between them, so that the grout lines would be even.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2005 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two banks whose business is about evenly divided between Philadelphia and Boston are making intramural bets over tomorrow's Super Bowl. "We can't lose," Sovereign Bancorp managing director Dick Ehst said. At Sovereign, the rematch is personal. In September 2003, when the Patriots beat the Eagles, Jim Lynch, head of Sovereign's Philadelphia-based Mid-Atlantic division, had to wash the SUV of John Hamill, then the head of Sovereign's New England arm. "I don't think Mr. Lynch put his best effort into it," bank spokesman Carl Brown said yesterday.
NEWS
September 5, 2002 | By Dean P. Johnson
My 10-year-old son has received an invitation to a birthday party at a popular pizza restaurant for the evening of Sept. 11, and I'm not sure whether this is evidence of poor judgment or sheer brilliance. As Sept. 11 nears, many of us grow just a little more unsettled, not so much from any concern of a reoccurrence of terroristic activities but from trepidation that we may not do the right thing in observance of the occasion. It's so important to do the right thing, too. Even though no one may ever notice you doing the right thing, rest assured you will be caught doing the wrong thing every time.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Florence landmark, Bung's Bar & Grill, that was forced to relocate to make way for a highway interchange has won an extra $44,000 from a jury this week to help pay for the tavern's replacement. The owners, John Hiros and his two sons, had sought $410,000 for the property on Route 130, including interest and other costs, but a panel appointed by the court offered $200,000. After a four-day civil trial before Superior Court Judge John A. Sweeney, a jury determined that the property was worth $244,000.
FOOD
November 22, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
In the fickle and ever-changing world of restaurants, 23 years is a long time to remain up and running, a lifespan that some restaurateurs might find impossible to attain with any vibrance. But at Judy's Cafe in Queen Village, there is a warmth to the ambience that has cured over the years like a well-seasoned cast-iron pan. Its moody lights and hardwood floors cast a comfy patina over a bar-lined dining room that is appealingly down-to-earth and durable, like the fabulous meat loaf and mashed potatoes that anchor the restaurant's eclectic menu.
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